Associations Between Early Childcare Environment and Different Aspects of Adulthood Sociability: The 32-Year Prospective Young Finns Study

Tutkimustuotos: ArtikkelijulkaisuArtikkeliTieteellinenvertaisarvioitu

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Sociability is a widely studied trait that has been linked both with individual well-and ill-being. Although early childcare has been shown to affect social competence in children, its role in the development of different aspects of adulthood sociability is poorly understood. Using a longitudinal population-based sample (N = 464), this study investigated whether childcare arrangements at ages 3 or 6 are associated with self-reported adulthood sociability at ages 20 to 35 years. A total of five aspects of sociability were measured using three well-established personality inventories (EAS, NEO-FFI, and TCI). Multilevel modeling was applied to examine the association between early care and adulthood sociability, adjusting for several sources of random variation (between-individual variance, within-individual variance between measurement times, variance between used sociability indicators, and error variance that cannot be attributed to the previously mentioned) and potential confounders (disruptive behavior in childhood, parental socio-economic status, parent-child relationship quality, maternal age, and the number of children in the family). Based on our results, in comparison to home care, family daycare and center-based daycare at age 3 and center-based daycare at age 6 were associated with higher sociability later in life. The association was strongest for aspects of sociability that emphasize the willingness to be surrounded by other people and to be attached to them. In other words, characteristics of early care may contribute uniquely to the development of these aspects of sociability with effects that persist into adult life
Alkuperäiskielienglanti
Artikkeli2060
LehtiFrontiers in Psychology
Vuosikerta10
Sivumäärä13
ISSN1664-1078
DOI - pysyväislinkit
TilaJulkaistu - 10 syyskuuta 2019
OKM-julkaisutyyppiA1 Alkuperäisartikkeli tieteellisessä aikakauslehdessä, vertaisarvioitu

Tieteenalat

  • 515 Psykologia

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@article{92f6fc2f9c6545749e72f5dff7460cec,
title = "Associations Between Early Childcare Environment and Different Aspects of Adulthood Sociability: The 32-Year Prospective Young Finns Study",
abstract = "Sociability is a widely studied trait that has been linked both with individual well-and ill-being. Although early childcare has been shown to affect social competence in children, its role in the development of different aspects of adulthood sociability is poorly understood. Using a longitudinal population-based sample (N = 464), this study investigated whether childcare arrangements at ages 3 or 6 are associated with self-reported adulthood sociability at ages 20 to 35 years. A total of five aspects of sociability were measured using three well-established personality inventories (EAS, NEO-FFI, and TCI). Multilevel modeling was applied to examine the association between early care and adulthood sociability, adjusting for several sources of random variation (between-individual variance, within-individual variance between measurement times, variance between used sociability indicators, and error variance that cannot be attributed to the previously mentioned) and potential confounders (disruptive behavior in childhood, parental socio-economic status, parent-child relationship quality, maternal age, and the number of children in the family). Based on our results, in comparison to home care, family daycare and center-based daycare at age 3 and center-based daycare at age 6 were associated with higher sociability later in life. The association was strongest for aspects of sociability that emphasize the willingness to be surrounded by other people and to be attached to them. In other words, characteristics of early care may contribute uniquely to the development of these aspects of sociability with effects that persist into adult life",
keywords = "DIMENSIONS, GENDER-DIFFERENCES, METAANALYSIS, MODEL, NICHD, OXYTOCIN, PERSONALITY, SYMPTOMS, TEMPERAMENT, TRAITS, early childcare environment, longitudinal study, multilevel modeling, personality assessment, personality development, sociability, 515 Psychology",
author = "Elli Oksman and Tom Rosenstr{\"o}m and Kia Gluschkoff and Aino Saarinen and Mirka Hintsanen and Laura Pulkki-R{\aa}back and Jorma Viikari and Raitakari, {Olli Tuomas} and Liisa Keltikangas-J{\"a}rvinen",
year = "2019",
month = "9",
day = "10",
doi = "10.3389/fpsyg.2019.02060",
language = "English",
volume = "10",
journal = "Frontiers in Psychology",
issn = "1664-1078",
publisher = "Frontiers Media",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Associations Between Early Childcare Environment and Different Aspects of Adulthood Sociability

T2 - The 32-Year Prospective Young Finns Study

AU - Oksman, Elli

AU - Rosenström, Tom

AU - Gluschkoff, Kia

AU - Saarinen, Aino

AU - Hintsanen, Mirka

AU - Pulkki-Råback, Laura

AU - Viikari, Jorma

AU - Raitakari, Olli Tuomas

AU - Keltikangas-Järvinen, Liisa

PY - 2019/9/10

Y1 - 2019/9/10

N2 - Sociability is a widely studied trait that has been linked both with individual well-and ill-being. Although early childcare has been shown to affect social competence in children, its role in the development of different aspects of adulthood sociability is poorly understood. Using a longitudinal population-based sample (N = 464), this study investigated whether childcare arrangements at ages 3 or 6 are associated with self-reported adulthood sociability at ages 20 to 35 years. A total of five aspects of sociability were measured using three well-established personality inventories (EAS, NEO-FFI, and TCI). Multilevel modeling was applied to examine the association between early care and adulthood sociability, adjusting for several sources of random variation (between-individual variance, within-individual variance between measurement times, variance between used sociability indicators, and error variance that cannot be attributed to the previously mentioned) and potential confounders (disruptive behavior in childhood, parental socio-economic status, parent-child relationship quality, maternal age, and the number of children in the family). Based on our results, in comparison to home care, family daycare and center-based daycare at age 3 and center-based daycare at age 6 were associated with higher sociability later in life. The association was strongest for aspects of sociability that emphasize the willingness to be surrounded by other people and to be attached to them. In other words, characteristics of early care may contribute uniquely to the development of these aspects of sociability with effects that persist into adult life

AB - Sociability is a widely studied trait that has been linked both with individual well-and ill-being. Although early childcare has been shown to affect social competence in children, its role in the development of different aspects of adulthood sociability is poorly understood. Using a longitudinal population-based sample (N = 464), this study investigated whether childcare arrangements at ages 3 or 6 are associated with self-reported adulthood sociability at ages 20 to 35 years. A total of five aspects of sociability were measured using three well-established personality inventories (EAS, NEO-FFI, and TCI). Multilevel modeling was applied to examine the association between early care and adulthood sociability, adjusting for several sources of random variation (between-individual variance, within-individual variance between measurement times, variance between used sociability indicators, and error variance that cannot be attributed to the previously mentioned) and potential confounders (disruptive behavior in childhood, parental socio-economic status, parent-child relationship quality, maternal age, and the number of children in the family). Based on our results, in comparison to home care, family daycare and center-based daycare at age 3 and center-based daycare at age 6 were associated with higher sociability later in life. The association was strongest for aspects of sociability that emphasize the willingness to be surrounded by other people and to be attached to them. In other words, characteristics of early care may contribute uniquely to the development of these aspects of sociability with effects that persist into adult life

KW - DIMENSIONS

KW - GENDER-DIFFERENCES

KW - METAANALYSIS

KW - MODEL

KW - NICHD

KW - OXYTOCIN

KW - PERSONALITY

KW - SYMPTOMS

KW - TEMPERAMENT

KW - TRAITS

KW - early childcare environment

KW - longitudinal study

KW - multilevel modeling

KW - personality assessment

KW - personality development

KW - sociability

KW - 515 Psychology

U2 - 10.3389/fpsyg.2019.02060

DO - 10.3389/fpsyg.2019.02060

M3 - Article

VL - 10

JO - Frontiers in Psychology

JF - Frontiers in Psychology

SN - 1664-1078

M1 - 2060

ER -