Attention and the Gestalt.

Experimental Investigation of Gestalt Imagery Processing in ADHD using Brain Imaging

Tutkimustuotos: Artikkeli kirjassa/raportissa/konferenssijulkaisussaKonferenssiartikkeliTieteellinen

Kuvaus

We investigate the role of visual salience processing in attention performance using two novel Event-Related Potentials (ERP) paradigms, with attention deficit disorder (ADD) patients and healthy control group comparison. Saliency refers to an order of importance attached to features of a scene by the visual attention system, making certain features 'stand out'. Order of processing is ~25-50ms. Task-related or top-down visual attention can modulate attention but the order is much slower, ~200ms or more. ADD sufferers tend to be described as deficient in task-related attention: although their trial-to-trial response times may be normal, their response time variability is much larger than normal. However little is known about the nature or effects of differences in their information processing in the pre-conscious time range. The protocol uses primers to reinforce or interfere with illusory contour Kanizsa shapes or non-shapes in a choice-response task, and tests interference inhibition at the task-response level, and saliency-processing at the pre-attentive level. We thus address a number of open questions with regard to attention deficit disorder: 1. How is the performance (accuracy, response time) deficit of low-performing subjects affected by the difficulty of the task - i.e. do 'interference' trials incur a penalty compared to 'reinforcer' trials? Such a result would suggest that the long-term attention deficit is in part driven by deficient saliency processing. 2. Do ERP recordings validate the performance data? We look for early components to differ between ADHD and controls, namely, that ADHD N1 and N2 should be reduced in amplitude (and possibly delayed). Also, we predict the delayed P3a would be more strongly represented in the right hemisphere, presumably in response to the gestalt nature of the stimuli. Results are presented on ERP measures of source-localised neural activations derived from high-resolution electroencephalography.
Alkuperäiskielienglanti
OtsikkoXVII Biennial Meeting of the International Society for Comparative Psychology : ICCP 2014
JulkaisupaikkaBogotá, Colombia
KustantajaInternational Society of Comparative Psychology
Julkaisupäivä12 syyskuuta 2014
TilaJulkaistu - 12 syyskuuta 2014
OKM-julkaisutyyppiB3 Vertaisarvioimaton artikkeli konferenssijulkaisussa
TapahtumaBiennial Meeting of the International Society for Comparative Psychology - Bogotá, Colombia, Kolumbia
Kesto: 10 syyskuuta 201412 syyskuuta 2014
Konferenssinumero: 17

Lisätietoja


Volume:
Proceeding volume:

Lainaa tätä

Cowley, B. U. (2014). Attention and the Gestalt. Experimental Investigation of Gestalt Imagery Processing in ADHD using Brain Imaging. teoksessa XVII Biennial Meeting of the International Society for Comparative Psychology: ICCP 2014 Bogotá, Colombia: International Society of Comparative Psychology.
Cowley, Benjamin Ultan. / Attention and the Gestalt. Experimental Investigation of Gestalt Imagery Processing in ADHD using Brain Imaging. XVII Biennial Meeting of the International Society for Comparative Psychology: ICCP 2014. Bogotá, Colombia : International Society of Comparative Psychology, 2014.
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title = "Attention and the Gestalt.: Experimental Investigation of Gestalt Imagery Processing in ADHD using Brain Imaging",
abstract = "We investigate the role of visual salience processing in attention performance using two novel Event-Related Potentials (ERP) paradigms, with attention deficit disorder (ADD) patients and healthy control group comparison. Saliency refers to an order of importance attached to features of a scene by the visual attention system, making certain features 'stand out'. Order of processing is ~25-50ms. Task-related or top-down visual attention can modulate attention but the order is much slower, ~200ms or more. ADD sufferers tend to be described as deficient in task-related attention: although their trial-to-trial response times may be normal, their response time variability is much larger than normal. However little is known about the nature or effects of differences in their information processing in the pre-conscious time range. The protocol uses primers to reinforce or interfere with illusory contour Kanizsa shapes or non-shapes in a choice-response task, and tests interference inhibition at the task-response level, and saliency-processing at the pre-attentive level. We thus address a number of open questions with regard to attention deficit disorder: 1. How is the performance (accuracy, response time) deficit of low-performing subjects affected by the difficulty of the task - i.e. do 'interference' trials incur a penalty compared to 'reinforcer' trials? Such a result would suggest that the long-term attention deficit is in part driven by deficient saliency processing. 2. Do ERP recordings validate the performance data? We look for early components to differ between ADHD and controls, namely, that ADHD N1 and N2 should be reduced in amplitude (and possibly delayed). Also, we predict the delayed P3a would be more strongly represented in the right hemisphere, presumably in response to the gestalt nature of the stimuli. Results are presented on ERP measures of source-localised neural activations derived from high-resolution electroencephalography.",
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Cowley, BU 2014, Attention and the Gestalt. Experimental Investigation of Gestalt Imagery Processing in ADHD using Brain Imaging. julkaisussa XVII Biennial Meeting of the International Society for Comparative Psychology: ICCP 2014. International Society of Comparative Psychology, Bogotá, Colombia, Biennial Meeting of the International Society for Comparative Psychology, Bogotá, Colombia, Kolumbia, 10/09/2014.

Attention and the Gestalt. Experimental Investigation of Gestalt Imagery Processing in ADHD using Brain Imaging. / Cowley, Benjamin Ultan.

XVII Biennial Meeting of the International Society for Comparative Psychology: ICCP 2014. Bogotá, Colombia : International Society of Comparative Psychology, 2014.

Tutkimustuotos: Artikkeli kirjassa/raportissa/konferenssijulkaisussaKonferenssiartikkeliTieteellinen

TY - GEN

T1 - Attention and the Gestalt.

T2 - Experimental Investigation of Gestalt Imagery Processing in ADHD using Brain Imaging

AU - Cowley, Benjamin Ultan

N1 - Volume: Proceeding volume:

PY - 2014/9/12

Y1 - 2014/9/12

N2 - We investigate the role of visual salience processing in attention performance using two novel Event-Related Potentials (ERP) paradigms, with attention deficit disorder (ADD) patients and healthy control group comparison. Saliency refers to an order of importance attached to features of a scene by the visual attention system, making certain features 'stand out'. Order of processing is ~25-50ms. Task-related or top-down visual attention can modulate attention but the order is much slower, ~200ms or more. ADD sufferers tend to be described as deficient in task-related attention: although their trial-to-trial response times may be normal, their response time variability is much larger than normal. However little is known about the nature or effects of differences in their information processing in the pre-conscious time range. The protocol uses primers to reinforce or interfere with illusory contour Kanizsa shapes or non-shapes in a choice-response task, and tests interference inhibition at the task-response level, and saliency-processing at the pre-attentive level. We thus address a number of open questions with regard to attention deficit disorder: 1. How is the performance (accuracy, response time) deficit of low-performing subjects affected by the difficulty of the task - i.e. do 'interference' trials incur a penalty compared to 'reinforcer' trials? Such a result would suggest that the long-term attention deficit is in part driven by deficient saliency processing. 2. Do ERP recordings validate the performance data? We look for early components to differ between ADHD and controls, namely, that ADHD N1 and N2 should be reduced in amplitude (and possibly delayed). Also, we predict the delayed P3a would be more strongly represented in the right hemisphere, presumably in response to the gestalt nature of the stimuli. Results are presented on ERP measures of source-localised neural activations derived from high-resolution electroencephalography.

AB - We investigate the role of visual salience processing in attention performance using two novel Event-Related Potentials (ERP) paradigms, with attention deficit disorder (ADD) patients and healthy control group comparison. Saliency refers to an order of importance attached to features of a scene by the visual attention system, making certain features 'stand out'. Order of processing is ~25-50ms. Task-related or top-down visual attention can modulate attention but the order is much slower, ~200ms or more. ADD sufferers tend to be described as deficient in task-related attention: although their trial-to-trial response times may be normal, their response time variability is much larger than normal. However little is known about the nature or effects of differences in their information processing in the pre-conscious time range. The protocol uses primers to reinforce or interfere with illusory contour Kanizsa shapes or non-shapes in a choice-response task, and tests interference inhibition at the task-response level, and saliency-processing at the pre-attentive level. We thus address a number of open questions with regard to attention deficit disorder: 1. How is the performance (accuracy, response time) deficit of low-performing subjects affected by the difficulty of the task - i.e. do 'interference' trials incur a penalty compared to 'reinforcer' trials? Such a result would suggest that the long-term attention deficit is in part driven by deficient saliency processing. 2. Do ERP recordings validate the performance data? We look for early components to differ between ADHD and controls, namely, that ADHD N1 and N2 should be reduced in amplitude (and possibly delayed). Also, we predict the delayed P3a would be more strongly represented in the right hemisphere, presumably in response to the gestalt nature of the stimuli. Results are presented on ERP measures of source-localised neural activations derived from high-resolution electroencephalography.

M3 - Conference contribution

BT - XVII Biennial Meeting of the International Society for Comparative Psychology

PB - International Society of Comparative Psychology

CY - Bogotá, Colombia

ER -

Cowley BU. Attention and the Gestalt. Experimental Investigation of Gestalt Imagery Processing in ADHD using Brain Imaging. julkaisussa XVII Biennial Meeting of the International Society for Comparative Psychology: ICCP 2014. Bogotá, Colombia: International Society of Comparative Psychology. 2014