Comparison of intestinal expression of the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter between dogs with and without chronic inflammatory enteropathy

Paula R Giaretta, Raquel R Rech, Blake C Guard, Amanda B Blake, Anna K Blick, Jörg M. Steiner, Jonathan A Lidbury, Audrey K Cook, Mohsen Hanifeh, Thomas Spillmann, Susanne Kilpinen, Pernilla Syrjä, Jan Suchodolski

Tutkimustuotos: ArtikkelijulkaisuArtikkeliTieteellinenvertaisarvioitu

Kuvaus

Background Objective Intestinal absorption of bile acids is mediated by the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (ASBT). Fecal bile acid dysmetabolism has been reported in dogs with chronic inflammatory enteropathy (CIE). Characterization of ASBT distribution along the intestinal tract of control dogs and comparison to dogs with CIE. Animals Methods Twenty-four dogs with CIE and 11 control dogs. The ASBT mRNA and protein expression were assessed using RNA in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry, respectively. The concentrations of fecal bile acids were measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The fecal microbiota dysbiosis index was assessed with a quantitative polymerase chain reaction panel. Results Conclusions and Clinical Importance In control dogs, ASBT mRNA expression was observed in enterocytes in all analyzed intestinal segments, with highest expression in the ileum. The ASBT protein expression was restricted to enterocytes in the ileum, cecum, and colon. Dogs with CIE had significantly decreased expression of ASBT protein in the ileum (P = .001), which was negatively correlated with histopathological score (rho = -0.40; P-corr = .049). Additionally, dogs with CIE had a significantly increased percentage of primary bile acids in feces compared to controls (P = .04). The fecal dysbiosis index was significantly higher in dogs with CIE than in control dogs (P = .01). These findings indicate that ileal protein expression of ASBT is downregulated in dogs with CIE. This change may be linked to the inflammatory process, intestinal dysbiosis, and fecal bile acid dysmetabolism observed in these patients.

Alkuperäiskielienglanti
LehtiJournal of Veterinary Internal Medicine
Vuosikerta32
Numero6
Sivut1918-1926
Sivumäärä9
ISSN1939-1676
DOI - pysyväislinkit
TilaJulkaistu - 2018
OKM-julkaisutyyppiA1 Alkuperäisartikkeli tieteellisessä aikakauslehdessä, vertaisarvioitu

Tieteenalat

  • 413 Eläinlääketiede

Lainaa tätä

Giaretta, Paula R ; Rech, Raquel R ; Guard, Blake C ; Blake, Amanda B ; Blick, Anna K ; Steiner, Jörg M. ; Lidbury, Jonathan A ; Cook, Audrey K ; Hanifeh, Mohsen ; Spillmann, Thomas ; Kilpinen, Susanne ; Syrjä, Pernilla ; Suchodolski, Jan. / Comparison of intestinal expression of the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter between dogs with and without chronic inflammatory enteropathy. Julkaisussa: Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine. 2018 ; Vuosikerta 32, Nro 6. Sivut 1918-1926.
@article{e9535ff3752b4d1ba50474abe021abb6,
title = "Comparison of intestinal expression of the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter between dogs with and without chronic inflammatory enteropathy",
abstract = "Background Objective Intestinal absorption of bile acids is mediated by the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (ASBT). Fecal bile acid dysmetabolism has been reported in dogs with chronic inflammatory enteropathy (CIE). Characterization of ASBT distribution along the intestinal tract of control dogs and comparison to dogs with CIE. Animals Methods Twenty-four dogs with CIE and 11 control dogs. The ASBT mRNA and protein expression were assessed using RNA in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry, respectively. The concentrations of fecal bile acids were measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The fecal microbiota dysbiosis index was assessed with a quantitative polymerase chain reaction panel. Results Conclusions and Clinical Importance In control dogs, ASBT mRNA expression was observed in enterocytes in all analyzed intestinal segments, with highest expression in the ileum. The ASBT protein expression was restricted to enterocytes in the ileum, cecum, and colon. Dogs with CIE had significantly decreased expression of ASBT protein in the ileum (P = .001), which was negatively correlated with histopathological score (rho = -0.40; P-corr = .049). Additionally, dogs with CIE had a significantly increased percentage of primary bile acids in feces compared to controls (P = .04). The fecal dysbiosis index was significantly higher in dogs with CIE than in control dogs (P = .01). These findings indicate that ileal protein expression of ASBT is downregulated in dogs with CIE. This change may be linked to the inflammatory process, intestinal dysbiosis, and fecal bile acid dysmetabolism observed in these patients.",
keywords = "dysbiosis, ileal bile acid transporter, inflammatory bowel disease, SLC10A2, MESSENGER-RNA EXPRESSION, BOWEL-DISEASE, ILEAL RESECTION, MALABSORPTION, DYSBIOSIS, CHOLESTYRAMINE, DIAGNOSIS, DIARRHEA, CLONING, ASBT, 413 Veterinary science",
author = "Giaretta, {Paula R} and Rech, {Raquel R} and Guard, {Blake C} and Blake, {Amanda B} and Blick, {Anna K} and Steiner, {J{\"o}rg M.} and Lidbury, {Jonathan A} and Cook, {Audrey K} and Mohsen Hanifeh and Thomas Spillmann and Susanne Kilpinen and Pernilla Syrj{\"a} and Jan Suchodolski",
year = "2018",
doi = "10.1111/jvim.15332",
language = "English",
volume = "32",
pages = "1918--1926",
journal = "Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine",
issn = "0891-6640",
publisher = "Wiley",
number = "6",

}

Comparison of intestinal expression of the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter between dogs with and without chronic inflammatory enteropathy. / Giaretta, Paula R; Rech, Raquel R; Guard, Blake C; Blake, Amanda B; Blick, Anna K; Steiner, Jörg M.; Lidbury, Jonathan A ; Cook, Audrey K; Hanifeh, Mohsen; Spillmann, Thomas; Kilpinen, Susanne; Syrjä, Pernilla ; Suchodolski, Jan.

julkaisussa: Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine, Vuosikerta 32, Nro 6, 2018, s. 1918-1926.

Tutkimustuotos: ArtikkelijulkaisuArtikkeliTieteellinenvertaisarvioitu

TY - JOUR

T1 - Comparison of intestinal expression of the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter between dogs with and without chronic inflammatory enteropathy

AU - Giaretta, Paula R

AU - Rech, Raquel R

AU - Guard, Blake C

AU - Blake, Amanda B

AU - Blick, Anna K

AU - Steiner, Jörg M.

AU - Lidbury, Jonathan A

AU - Cook, Audrey K

AU - Hanifeh, Mohsen

AU - Spillmann, Thomas

AU - Kilpinen, Susanne

AU - Syrjä, Pernilla

AU - Suchodolski, Jan

PY - 2018

Y1 - 2018

N2 - Background Objective Intestinal absorption of bile acids is mediated by the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (ASBT). Fecal bile acid dysmetabolism has been reported in dogs with chronic inflammatory enteropathy (CIE). Characterization of ASBT distribution along the intestinal tract of control dogs and comparison to dogs with CIE. Animals Methods Twenty-four dogs with CIE and 11 control dogs. The ASBT mRNA and protein expression were assessed using RNA in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry, respectively. The concentrations of fecal bile acids were measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The fecal microbiota dysbiosis index was assessed with a quantitative polymerase chain reaction panel. Results Conclusions and Clinical Importance In control dogs, ASBT mRNA expression was observed in enterocytes in all analyzed intestinal segments, with highest expression in the ileum. The ASBT protein expression was restricted to enterocytes in the ileum, cecum, and colon. Dogs with CIE had significantly decreased expression of ASBT protein in the ileum (P = .001), which was negatively correlated with histopathological score (rho = -0.40; P-corr = .049). Additionally, dogs with CIE had a significantly increased percentage of primary bile acids in feces compared to controls (P = .04). The fecal dysbiosis index was significantly higher in dogs with CIE than in control dogs (P = .01). These findings indicate that ileal protein expression of ASBT is downregulated in dogs with CIE. This change may be linked to the inflammatory process, intestinal dysbiosis, and fecal bile acid dysmetabolism observed in these patients.

AB - Background Objective Intestinal absorption of bile acids is mediated by the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (ASBT). Fecal bile acid dysmetabolism has been reported in dogs with chronic inflammatory enteropathy (CIE). Characterization of ASBT distribution along the intestinal tract of control dogs and comparison to dogs with CIE. Animals Methods Twenty-four dogs with CIE and 11 control dogs. The ASBT mRNA and protein expression were assessed using RNA in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry, respectively. The concentrations of fecal bile acids were measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The fecal microbiota dysbiosis index was assessed with a quantitative polymerase chain reaction panel. Results Conclusions and Clinical Importance In control dogs, ASBT mRNA expression was observed in enterocytes in all analyzed intestinal segments, with highest expression in the ileum. The ASBT protein expression was restricted to enterocytes in the ileum, cecum, and colon. Dogs with CIE had significantly decreased expression of ASBT protein in the ileum (P = .001), which was negatively correlated with histopathological score (rho = -0.40; P-corr = .049). Additionally, dogs with CIE had a significantly increased percentage of primary bile acids in feces compared to controls (P = .04). The fecal dysbiosis index was significantly higher in dogs with CIE than in control dogs (P = .01). These findings indicate that ileal protein expression of ASBT is downregulated in dogs with CIE. This change may be linked to the inflammatory process, intestinal dysbiosis, and fecal bile acid dysmetabolism observed in these patients.

KW - dysbiosis

KW - ileal bile acid transporter

KW - inflammatory bowel disease

KW - SLC10A2

KW - MESSENGER-RNA EXPRESSION

KW - BOWEL-DISEASE

KW - ILEAL RESECTION

KW - MALABSORPTION

KW - DYSBIOSIS

KW - CHOLESTYRAMINE

KW - DIAGNOSIS

KW - DIARRHEA

KW - CLONING

KW - ASBT

KW - 413 Veterinary science

U2 - 10.1111/jvim.15332

DO - 10.1111/jvim.15332

M3 - Article

VL - 32

SP - 1918

EP - 1926

JO - Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine

JF - Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine

SN - 0891-6640

IS - 6

ER -