Cytotoxic and apoptotic effects of selected phenolic compounds and extracts from edible plants

Tiina Anita Lantto

Tutkimustuotos: OpinnäyteVäitöskirjaArtikkelikokoelma

Kuvaus

Plant phenolics and extracts are able to affect cell signalling associated with regulated cell-death mechanisms. Such mechanisms play a crucial role in the normal homeostasis of an organism, but inadequately functioning cell-death machinery is a component of the development of complex diseases, such as cancer, where cells divide in an uncontrolled manner. Apoptosis is the most studied regulated cell-death mechanism associated with cancer. One of the key triggers of and contributors to apoptotic cell death is a tumour suppressor p53. This protein is constantly produced, though it is activated only by several cellular stress responses, such as endoplasmic reticulum stress. The purpose of this study is to investigate the cytotoxic and apoptotic properties of three plant phenolics – curcumin, resveratrol and quercetin – and seven plant extracts – basil, juniper, laurel, lemon balm, parsley, and Siberian pine – in cancerous neuroblastoma and melanoma, and non-cancerous fibroblast cell models. The emphasis of the work is on plant extracts due to their claimed additive or synergistic effects on cellular mechanisms. The effects of different treatments are determined by two cell-viability tests, followed by Western blot assays of the amounts of p53, anti-apoptotic Bcl-2, and inflammatory p65. Apoptotic events are defined by the activity of caspase 3 and DNA fragmentation. Further testing to reveal a broader spectrum of effects is defined by the cDNA RDA method in order to investigate genes expressed differently in treated and in untreated cells. The results of this study support existing knowledge of the effects of single-plant phenolics, and reveal new mechanisms for the activity of plant extracts. Possible synergistic or additive effects of juniper plant extract on apoptosis through endoplasmic reticulum stress are observed. Plant phenolics and extracts may provide a unique pool of drug candidates for the prevention or treatment of cancer. The use of plant extracts as drug candidates is especially interesting due to the possible synergistic or additive effects they achieve at low concentrations.
Alkuperäiskielienglanti
Myöntävä instituutio
  • Helsingin yliopisto
Valvoja/neuvonantaja
  • Raasmaja, Atso , Valvoja
  • Hiltunen, Raimo Vilho Kari, Valvoja
  • Koks, Sulev, Valvoja, Ulkoinen henkilö
Myöntöpäivämäärä10 marraskuuta 2017
JulkaisupaikkaHelsinki
Kustantaja
Painoksen ISBN978-951-51-3799-9
Sähköinen ISBN978-951-51-3800-2
TilaJulkaistu - 10 marraskuuta 2017
OKM-julkaisutyyppiG5 Tohtorinväitöskirja (artikkeli)

Tieteenalat

  • 1183 Kasvibiologia, mikrobiologia, virologia
  • 317 Farmasia

Lainaa tätä

Lantto, Tiina Anita. / Cytotoxic and apoptotic effects of selected phenolic compounds and extracts from edible plants. Helsinki : University of Helsinki, 2017. 93 Sivumäärä
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title = "Cytotoxic and apoptotic effects of selected phenolic compounds and extracts from edible plants",
abstract = "Plant phenolics and extracts are able to affect cell signalling associated with regulated cell-death mechanisms. Such mechanisms play a crucial role in the normal homeostasis of an organism, but inadequately functioning cell-death machinery is a component of the development of complex diseases, such as cancer, where cells divide in an uncontrolled manner. Apoptosis is the most studied regulated cell-death mechanism associated with cancer. One of the key triggers of and contributors to apoptotic cell death is a tumour suppressor p53. This protein is constantly produced, though it is activated only by several cellular stress responses, such as endoplasmic reticulum stress. The purpose of this study is to investigate the cytotoxic and apoptotic properties of three plant phenolics – curcumin, resveratrol and quercetin – and seven plant extracts – basil, juniper, laurel, lemon balm, parsley, and Siberian pine – in cancerous neuroblastoma and melanoma, and non-cancerous fibroblast cell models. The emphasis of the work is on plant extracts due to their claimed additive or synergistic effects on cellular mechanisms. The effects of different treatments are determined by two cell-viability tests, followed by Western blot assays of the amounts of p53, anti-apoptotic Bcl-2, and inflammatory p65. Apoptotic events are defined by the activity of caspase 3 and DNA fragmentation. Further testing to reveal a broader spectrum of effects is defined by the cDNA RDA method in order to investigate genes expressed differently in treated and in untreated cells. The results of this study support existing knowledge of the effects of single-plant phenolics, and reveal new mechanisms for the activity of plant extracts. Possible synergistic or additive effects of juniper plant extract on apoptosis through endoplasmic reticulum stress are observed. Plant phenolics and extracts may provide a unique pool of drug candidates for the prevention or treatment of cancer. The use of plant extracts as drug candidates is especially interesting due to the possible synergistic or additive effects they achieve at low concentrations.",
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Cytotoxic and apoptotic effects of selected phenolic compounds and extracts from edible plants. / Lantto, Tiina Anita.

Helsinki : University of Helsinki, 2017. 93 s.

Tutkimustuotos: OpinnäyteVäitöskirjaArtikkelikokoelma

TY - THES

T1 - Cytotoxic and apoptotic effects of selected phenolic compounds and extracts from edible plants

AU - Lantto, Tiina Anita

PY - 2017/11/10

Y1 - 2017/11/10

N2 - Plant phenolics and extracts are able to affect cell signalling associated with regulated cell-death mechanisms. Such mechanisms play a crucial role in the normal homeostasis of an organism, but inadequately functioning cell-death machinery is a component of the development of complex diseases, such as cancer, where cells divide in an uncontrolled manner. Apoptosis is the most studied regulated cell-death mechanism associated with cancer. One of the key triggers of and contributors to apoptotic cell death is a tumour suppressor p53. This protein is constantly produced, though it is activated only by several cellular stress responses, such as endoplasmic reticulum stress. The purpose of this study is to investigate the cytotoxic and apoptotic properties of three plant phenolics – curcumin, resveratrol and quercetin – and seven plant extracts – basil, juniper, laurel, lemon balm, parsley, and Siberian pine – in cancerous neuroblastoma and melanoma, and non-cancerous fibroblast cell models. The emphasis of the work is on plant extracts due to their claimed additive or synergistic effects on cellular mechanisms. The effects of different treatments are determined by two cell-viability tests, followed by Western blot assays of the amounts of p53, anti-apoptotic Bcl-2, and inflammatory p65. Apoptotic events are defined by the activity of caspase 3 and DNA fragmentation. Further testing to reveal a broader spectrum of effects is defined by the cDNA RDA method in order to investigate genes expressed differently in treated and in untreated cells. The results of this study support existing knowledge of the effects of single-plant phenolics, and reveal new mechanisms for the activity of plant extracts. Possible synergistic or additive effects of juniper plant extract on apoptosis through endoplasmic reticulum stress are observed. Plant phenolics and extracts may provide a unique pool of drug candidates for the prevention or treatment of cancer. The use of plant extracts as drug candidates is especially interesting due to the possible synergistic or additive effects they achieve at low concentrations.

AB - Plant phenolics and extracts are able to affect cell signalling associated with regulated cell-death mechanisms. Such mechanisms play a crucial role in the normal homeostasis of an organism, but inadequately functioning cell-death machinery is a component of the development of complex diseases, such as cancer, where cells divide in an uncontrolled manner. Apoptosis is the most studied regulated cell-death mechanism associated with cancer. One of the key triggers of and contributors to apoptotic cell death is a tumour suppressor p53. This protein is constantly produced, though it is activated only by several cellular stress responses, such as endoplasmic reticulum stress. The purpose of this study is to investigate the cytotoxic and apoptotic properties of three plant phenolics – curcumin, resveratrol and quercetin – and seven plant extracts – basil, juniper, laurel, lemon balm, parsley, and Siberian pine – in cancerous neuroblastoma and melanoma, and non-cancerous fibroblast cell models. The emphasis of the work is on plant extracts due to their claimed additive or synergistic effects on cellular mechanisms. The effects of different treatments are determined by two cell-viability tests, followed by Western blot assays of the amounts of p53, anti-apoptotic Bcl-2, and inflammatory p65. Apoptotic events are defined by the activity of caspase 3 and DNA fragmentation. Further testing to reveal a broader spectrum of effects is defined by the cDNA RDA method in order to investigate genes expressed differently in treated and in untreated cells. The results of this study support existing knowledge of the effects of single-plant phenolics, and reveal new mechanisms for the activity of plant extracts. Possible synergistic or additive effects of juniper plant extract on apoptosis through endoplasmic reticulum stress are observed. Plant phenolics and extracts may provide a unique pool of drug candidates for the prevention or treatment of cancer. The use of plant extracts as drug candidates is especially interesting due to the possible synergistic or additive effects they achieve at low concentrations.

KW - 1183 Plant biology, microbiology, virology

KW - 317 Pharmacy

M3 - Doctoral Thesis

SN - 978-951-51-3799-9

T3 - Dissertationes Scholae Doctoralis Ad Sanitatem Investigandam Universitatis Helsinkiensis

PB - University of Helsinki

CY - Helsinki

ER -

Lantto TA. Cytotoxic and apoptotic effects of selected phenolic compounds and extracts from edible plants. Helsinki: University of Helsinki, 2017. 93 s. (Dissertationes Scholae Doctoralis Ad Sanitatem Investigandam Universitatis Helsinkiensis; 62/2017).