Detection thresholds for quinine, PTC, and PROP measured using taste strips

Annachiara Cavazzana, Antti Knaapila, Florian Roßkopf, Pengfei Han, Thomas Hummel

Tutkimustuotos: ArtikkelijulkaisuArtikkeliTieteellinenvertaisarvioitu

Kuvaus

Purpose In clinical practice, when ability to perceive bitter taste is studied, quinine is preferred to phenylthiocarbamide
(PTC) and 6-n-propylthiouracil (PROP) as taste stimulus, because many subjects are genetically non-tasters for PTC/PROP.
However, it is poorly known how sensitive anterior (front) and posterior (back) parts of the tongue are to different bitter
tastants that are detected by different bitter taste receptors (TAS2Rs). In the present study, we aimed to characterize sensitivity
to bitter taste at front and back parts of tongue.
Methods We measured thresholds for quinine, PTC, and PROP using the “taste strips”, employing seven concentrations of
each stimulus both at front and back parts of tongue in 203 healthy participants (56% females, mean age 28 years).
Results Our data confirmed the hypothesis that the inability to perceive quinine was less frequent than the inability to perceive
PTC and PROP: People can still perceive the bitter taste of quinine even if they are “non-tasters” for PROP/PTC. As expected,
strong correlations between PTC and PROP thresholds were observed. Interestingly, correlations between thresholds for
quinine and PTC/PROP also emerged. Overall, the detection thresholds were lower when measured at front part of the tongue.
Conclusions Our data suggest that determining taster status for quinine using paper “taste strips”, applied to front part of
the tongue, represents a suitable method for the screening for ageusia for bitter taste.
Alkuperäiskielienglanti
LehtiEuropean Archives of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology
Vuosikerta276
Sivut753–759
ISSN0937-4477
TilaJulkaistu - 2019
OKM-julkaisutyyppiA1 Alkuperäisartikkeli tieteellisessä aikakauslehdessä, vertaisarvioitu

Tieteenalat

  • 416 Elintarviketieteet
  • Taste
  • Bitter
  • PROP
  • PTC
  • Quinine

Lainaa tätä

Cavazzana, Annachiara ; Knaapila, Antti ; Roßkopf, Florian ; Han, Pengfei ; Hummel, Thomas. / Detection thresholds for quinine, PTC, and PROP measured using taste strips. Julkaisussa: European Archives of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology. 2019 ; Vuosikerta 276. Sivut 753–759.
@article{432667fe8f48496cac55ea17b279a8ee,
title = "Detection thresholds for quinine, PTC, and PROP measured using taste strips",
abstract = "Purpose In clinical practice, when ability to perceive bitter taste is studied, quinine is preferred to phenylthiocarbamide(PTC) and 6-n-propylthiouracil (PROP) as taste stimulus, because many subjects are genetically non-tasters for PTC/PROP.However, it is poorly known how sensitive anterior (front) and posterior (back) parts of the tongue are to different bittertastants that are detected by different bitter taste receptors (TAS2Rs). In the present study, we aimed to characterize sensitivityto bitter taste at front and back parts of tongue.Methods We measured thresholds for quinine, PTC, and PROP using the “taste strips”, employing seven concentrations ofeach stimulus both at front and back parts of tongue in 203 healthy participants (56{\%} females, mean age 28 years).Results Our data confirmed the hypothesis that the inability to perceive quinine was less frequent than the inability to perceivePTC and PROP: People can still perceive the bitter taste of quinine even if they are “non-tasters” for PROP/PTC. As expected,strong correlations between PTC and PROP thresholds were observed. Interestingly, correlations between thresholds forquinine and PTC/PROP also emerged. Overall, the detection thresholds were lower when measured at front part of the tongue.Conclusions Our data suggest that determining taster status for quinine using paper “taste strips”, applied to front part ofthe tongue, represents a suitable method for the screening for ageusia for bitter taste.",
keywords = "416 Food Science, Taste, Bitter, PROP, PTC, Quinine",
author = "Annachiara Cavazzana and Antti Knaapila and Florian Ro{\ss}kopf and Pengfei Han and Thomas Hummel",
year = "2019",
language = "English",
volume = "276",
pages = "753–759",
journal = "European Archives of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology",
issn = "0937-4477",
publisher = "Springer",

}

Cavazzana, A, Knaapila, A, Roßkopf, F, Han, P & Hummel, T 2019, 'Detection thresholds for quinine, PTC, and PROP measured using taste strips', European Archives of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Vuosikerta 276, Sivut 753–759.

Detection thresholds for quinine, PTC, and PROP measured using taste strips. / Cavazzana, Annachiara; Knaapila, Antti; Roßkopf, Florian; Han, Pengfei; Hummel, Thomas.

julkaisussa: European Archives of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Vuosikerta 276, 2019, s. 753–759.

Tutkimustuotos: ArtikkelijulkaisuArtikkeliTieteellinenvertaisarvioitu

TY - JOUR

T1 - Detection thresholds for quinine, PTC, and PROP measured using taste strips

AU - Cavazzana, Annachiara

AU - Knaapila, Antti

AU - Roßkopf, Florian

AU - Han, Pengfei

AU - Hummel, Thomas

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - Purpose In clinical practice, when ability to perceive bitter taste is studied, quinine is preferred to phenylthiocarbamide(PTC) and 6-n-propylthiouracil (PROP) as taste stimulus, because many subjects are genetically non-tasters for PTC/PROP.However, it is poorly known how sensitive anterior (front) and posterior (back) parts of the tongue are to different bittertastants that are detected by different bitter taste receptors (TAS2Rs). In the present study, we aimed to characterize sensitivityto bitter taste at front and back parts of tongue.Methods We measured thresholds for quinine, PTC, and PROP using the “taste strips”, employing seven concentrations ofeach stimulus both at front and back parts of tongue in 203 healthy participants (56% females, mean age 28 years).Results Our data confirmed the hypothesis that the inability to perceive quinine was less frequent than the inability to perceivePTC and PROP: People can still perceive the bitter taste of quinine even if they are “non-tasters” for PROP/PTC. As expected,strong correlations between PTC and PROP thresholds were observed. Interestingly, correlations between thresholds forquinine and PTC/PROP also emerged. Overall, the detection thresholds were lower when measured at front part of the tongue.Conclusions Our data suggest that determining taster status for quinine using paper “taste strips”, applied to front part ofthe tongue, represents a suitable method for the screening for ageusia for bitter taste.

AB - Purpose In clinical practice, when ability to perceive bitter taste is studied, quinine is preferred to phenylthiocarbamide(PTC) and 6-n-propylthiouracil (PROP) as taste stimulus, because many subjects are genetically non-tasters for PTC/PROP.However, it is poorly known how sensitive anterior (front) and posterior (back) parts of the tongue are to different bittertastants that are detected by different bitter taste receptors (TAS2Rs). In the present study, we aimed to characterize sensitivityto bitter taste at front and back parts of tongue.Methods We measured thresholds for quinine, PTC, and PROP using the “taste strips”, employing seven concentrations ofeach stimulus both at front and back parts of tongue in 203 healthy participants (56% females, mean age 28 years).Results Our data confirmed the hypothesis that the inability to perceive quinine was less frequent than the inability to perceivePTC and PROP: People can still perceive the bitter taste of quinine even if they are “non-tasters” for PROP/PTC. As expected,strong correlations between PTC and PROP thresholds were observed. Interestingly, correlations between thresholds forquinine and PTC/PROP also emerged. Overall, the detection thresholds were lower when measured at front part of the tongue.Conclusions Our data suggest that determining taster status for quinine using paper “taste strips”, applied to front part ofthe tongue, represents a suitable method for the screening for ageusia for bitter taste.

KW - 416 Food Science

KW - Taste

KW - Bitter

KW - PROP

KW - PTC

KW - Quinine

M3 - Article

VL - 276

SP - 753

EP - 759

JO - European Archives of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology

JF - European Archives of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology

SN - 0937-4477

ER -