Kuvaus

Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer worldwide, and its incidence is expected to increase to over 2.2 million new cases in 2030. Stage II CRC is classified as localized disease, while stage III CRC has spread to regional lymph nodes. The 5-year survival rate is over 80% for patients with stage II CRC, but less than 60% for patients with stage III CRC. Proteins, especially plasma proteins that are detectable in easily obtained blood samples, that differ between stage II and III CRC could be useful for predicting and monitoring disease progression. CRC displays differences depending on primary tumor location (right colon, left colon, or rectum), and how plasma protein expression changes during CRC progression from stage II to III depending on primary tumor location is not well-characterized.
Alkuperäiskielienglanti
LehtiTranslational Medicine Communications
Vuosikerta4
Numero1
ISSN2396-832X
DOI - pysyväislinkit
TilaJulkaistu - 5 elokuuta 2019
OKM-julkaisutyyppiA1 Alkuperäisartikkeli tieteellisessä aikakauslehdessä, vertaisarvioitu

Tieteenalat

  • 3111 Biolääketieteet

Lainaa tätä

@article{a65f58ee421643458bb5e69c9f6436d4,
title = "Differences and overlap in plasma protein expression during colorectal cancer progression",
abstract = "Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer worldwide, and its incidence is expected to increase to over 2.2 million new cases in 2030. Stage II CRC is classified as localized disease, while stage III CRC has spread to regional lymph nodes. The 5-year survival rate is over 80{\%} for patients with stage II CRC, but less than 60{\%} for patients with stage III CRC. Proteins, especially plasma proteins that are detectable in easily obtained blood samples, that differ between stage II and III CRC could be useful for predicting and monitoring disease progression. CRC displays differences depending on primary tumor location (right colon, left colon, or rectum), and how plasma protein expression changes during CRC progression from stage II to III depending on primary tumor location is not well-characterized.",
keywords = "3111 Biomedicine",
author = "Matilda Holm and Sakari Joenv{\"a}{\"a}r{\"a} and Mayank Saraswat and Tiialotta Tohmola and Ari Ristim{\"a}ki and Risto Renkonen and Caj Haglund",
year = "2019",
month = "8",
day = "5",
doi = "10.1186/s41231-019-0044-5",
language = "English",
volume = "4",
journal = "Translational Medicine Communications",
issn = "2396-832X",
publisher = "BioMed Central",
number = "1",

}

Differences and overlap in plasma protein expression during colorectal cancer progression. / Holm, Matilda; Joenväärä, Sakari; Saraswat, Mayank; Tohmola, Tiialotta; Ristimäki, Ari; Renkonen, Risto; Haglund, Caj.

julkaisussa: Translational Medicine Communications, Vuosikerta 4, Nro 1, 05.08.2019.

Tutkimustuotos: ArtikkelijulkaisuArtikkeliTieteellinenvertaisarvioitu

TY - JOUR

T1 - Differences and overlap in plasma protein expression during colorectal cancer progression

AU - Holm, Matilda

AU - Joenväärä, Sakari

AU - Saraswat, Mayank

AU - Tohmola, Tiialotta

AU - Ristimäki, Ari

AU - Renkonen, Risto

AU - Haglund, Caj

PY - 2019/8/5

Y1 - 2019/8/5

N2 - Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer worldwide, and its incidence is expected to increase to over 2.2 million new cases in 2030. Stage II CRC is classified as localized disease, while stage III CRC has spread to regional lymph nodes. The 5-year survival rate is over 80% for patients with stage II CRC, but less than 60% for patients with stage III CRC. Proteins, especially plasma proteins that are detectable in easily obtained blood samples, that differ between stage II and III CRC could be useful for predicting and monitoring disease progression. CRC displays differences depending on primary tumor location (right colon, left colon, or rectum), and how plasma protein expression changes during CRC progression from stage II to III depending on primary tumor location is not well-characterized.

AB - Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer worldwide, and its incidence is expected to increase to over 2.2 million new cases in 2030. Stage II CRC is classified as localized disease, while stage III CRC has spread to regional lymph nodes. The 5-year survival rate is over 80% for patients with stage II CRC, but less than 60% for patients with stage III CRC. Proteins, especially plasma proteins that are detectable in easily obtained blood samples, that differ between stage II and III CRC could be useful for predicting and monitoring disease progression. CRC displays differences depending on primary tumor location (right colon, left colon, or rectum), and how plasma protein expression changes during CRC progression from stage II to III depending on primary tumor location is not well-characterized.

KW - 3111 Biomedicine

U2 - 10.1186/s41231-019-0044-5

DO - 10.1186/s41231-019-0044-5

M3 - Article

VL - 4

JO - Translational Medicine Communications

JF - Translational Medicine Communications

SN - 2396-832X

IS - 1

ER -