Disc degeneration in low back pain

a 17-year follow-up study using magnetic resonance imaging

Eero Waris, Marja Eskelin, Heikki Hermunen, Olli Kiviluoto, Hannu Paajanen

    Tutkimustuotos: ArtikkelijulkaisuArtikkeliTieteellinenvertaisarvioitu

    Kuvaus

    Twin studies suggest that both disc degeneration and back pain have a genetic component. We were interested in estimating the heritability of low back pain in men and examining whether genetic influences on back pain are mediated through genetic influences on disc degeneration. Thus, we conducted a classic twin study with multivariate quantitative genetic models to estimate the degree to which genetic (or environmental) effects on back pain were correlated with genetic (or environmental) effects on disc degeneration. Subjects included 147 monozygotic and 153 dizygotic male twin pairs (N = 600 subjects) from the population-based Finnish Twin Cohort. All subjects underwent lumbar magnetic resonance imaging and completed an extensive interview, including back pain history and exposure to suspected risk factors. Disc height narrowing was the degenerative finding most associated with pain history, and was used to index disc degeneration in the models. Statistically significant genetic correlations were found for disc height narrowing and different definitions of back pain, such as duration of the worst back pain episode (r(g) = 0.46) and hospitalization for back problems (r(g) = 0.49), as well as disability in the previous year from back pain (r(g) = 0.33). The heritability estimates for these back pain variables ranged from 30% to 46%. There also were statistically significant, but weaker, environmental correlations for disc height narrowing with back symptoms over the prior year. A substantial minority of the genetic influences on pain was due to the same genetic influences affecting disc degeneration. This suggests that disc degeneration is one pathway through which genes influence back pain. (C) 2007 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
    Alkuperäiskielienglanti
    LehtiSpine
    Vuosikerta32
    Numero6
    Sivut681-684
    Sivumäärä4
    ISSN0362-2436
    DOI - pysyväislinkit
    TilaJulkaistu - 2007
    OKM-julkaisutyyppiA1 Alkuperäisartikkeli tieteellisessä aikakauslehdessä, vertaisarvioitu

    Tieteenalat

    • 3126 Kirurgia, anestesiologia, tehohoito, radiologia
    • 3112 Neurotieteet
    • 3124 Neurologia ja psykiatria

    Lainaa tätä

    Waris, Eero ; Eskelin, Marja ; Hermunen, Heikki ; Kiviluoto, Olli ; Paajanen, Hannu. / Disc degeneration in low back pain : a 17-year follow-up study using magnetic resonance imaging. Julkaisussa: Spine. 2007 ; Vuosikerta 32, Nro 6. Sivut 681-684.
    @article{7ee83f1c5cd2474fba0ec241b18c2724,
    title = "Disc degeneration in low back pain: a 17-year follow-up study using magnetic resonance imaging",
    abstract = "Twin studies suggest that both disc degeneration and back pain have a genetic component. We were interested in estimating the heritability of low back pain in men and examining whether genetic influences on back pain are mediated through genetic influences on disc degeneration. Thus, we conducted a classic twin study with multivariate quantitative genetic models to estimate the degree to which genetic (or environmental) effects on back pain were correlated with genetic (or environmental) effects on disc degeneration. Subjects included 147 monozygotic and 153 dizygotic male twin pairs (N = 600 subjects) from the population-based Finnish Twin Cohort. All subjects underwent lumbar magnetic resonance imaging and completed an extensive interview, including back pain history and exposure to suspected risk factors. Disc height narrowing was the degenerative finding most associated with pain history, and was used to index disc degeneration in the models. Statistically significant genetic correlations were found for disc height narrowing and different definitions of back pain, such as duration of the worst back pain episode (r(g) = 0.46) and hospitalization for back problems (r(g) = 0.49), as well as disability in the previous year from back pain (r(g) = 0.33). The heritability estimates for these back pain variables ranged from 30{\%} to 46{\%}. There also were statistically significant, but weaker, environmental correlations for disc height narrowing with back symptoms over the prior year. A substantial minority of the genetic influences on pain was due to the same genetic influences affecting disc degeneration. This suggests that disc degeneration is one pathway through which genes influence back pain. (C) 2007 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.",
    keywords = "3126 Surgery, anesthesiology, intensive care, radiology, 3112 Neurosciences, 3124 Neurology and psychiatry",
    author = "Eero Waris and Marja Eskelin and Heikki Hermunen and Olli Kiviluoto and Hannu Paajanen",
    year = "2007",
    doi = "10.1097/01.tp.0000259249.24268.34",
    language = "English",
    volume = "32",
    pages = "681--684",
    journal = "Spine",
    issn = "0362-2436",
    publisher = "LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINS",
    number = "6",

    }

    Disc degeneration in low back pain : a 17-year follow-up study using magnetic resonance imaging. / Waris, Eero; Eskelin, Marja; Hermunen, Heikki; Kiviluoto, Olli; Paajanen, Hannu.

    julkaisussa: Spine, Vuosikerta 32, Nro 6, 2007, s. 681-684.

    Tutkimustuotos: ArtikkelijulkaisuArtikkeliTieteellinenvertaisarvioitu

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Disc degeneration in low back pain

    T2 - a 17-year follow-up study using magnetic resonance imaging

    AU - Waris, Eero

    AU - Eskelin, Marja

    AU - Hermunen, Heikki

    AU - Kiviluoto, Olli

    AU - Paajanen, Hannu

    PY - 2007

    Y1 - 2007

    N2 - Twin studies suggest that both disc degeneration and back pain have a genetic component. We were interested in estimating the heritability of low back pain in men and examining whether genetic influences on back pain are mediated through genetic influences on disc degeneration. Thus, we conducted a classic twin study with multivariate quantitative genetic models to estimate the degree to which genetic (or environmental) effects on back pain were correlated with genetic (or environmental) effects on disc degeneration. Subjects included 147 monozygotic and 153 dizygotic male twin pairs (N = 600 subjects) from the population-based Finnish Twin Cohort. All subjects underwent lumbar magnetic resonance imaging and completed an extensive interview, including back pain history and exposure to suspected risk factors. Disc height narrowing was the degenerative finding most associated with pain history, and was used to index disc degeneration in the models. Statistically significant genetic correlations were found for disc height narrowing and different definitions of back pain, such as duration of the worst back pain episode (r(g) = 0.46) and hospitalization for back problems (r(g) = 0.49), as well as disability in the previous year from back pain (r(g) = 0.33). The heritability estimates for these back pain variables ranged from 30% to 46%. There also were statistically significant, but weaker, environmental correlations for disc height narrowing with back symptoms over the prior year. A substantial minority of the genetic influences on pain was due to the same genetic influences affecting disc degeneration. This suggests that disc degeneration is one pathway through which genes influence back pain. (C) 2007 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

    AB - Twin studies suggest that both disc degeneration and back pain have a genetic component. We were interested in estimating the heritability of low back pain in men and examining whether genetic influences on back pain are mediated through genetic influences on disc degeneration. Thus, we conducted a classic twin study with multivariate quantitative genetic models to estimate the degree to which genetic (or environmental) effects on back pain were correlated with genetic (or environmental) effects on disc degeneration. Subjects included 147 monozygotic and 153 dizygotic male twin pairs (N = 600 subjects) from the population-based Finnish Twin Cohort. All subjects underwent lumbar magnetic resonance imaging and completed an extensive interview, including back pain history and exposure to suspected risk factors. Disc height narrowing was the degenerative finding most associated with pain history, and was used to index disc degeneration in the models. Statistically significant genetic correlations were found for disc height narrowing and different definitions of back pain, such as duration of the worst back pain episode (r(g) = 0.46) and hospitalization for back problems (r(g) = 0.49), as well as disability in the previous year from back pain (r(g) = 0.33). The heritability estimates for these back pain variables ranged from 30% to 46%. There also were statistically significant, but weaker, environmental correlations for disc height narrowing with back symptoms over the prior year. A substantial minority of the genetic influences on pain was due to the same genetic influences affecting disc degeneration. This suggests that disc degeneration is one pathway through which genes influence back pain. (C) 2007 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

    KW - 3126 Surgery, anesthesiology, intensive care, radiology

    KW - 3112 Neurosciences

    KW - 3124 Neurology and psychiatry

    U2 - 10.1097/01.tp.0000259249.24268.34

    DO - 10.1097/01.tp.0000259249.24268.34

    M3 - Article

    VL - 32

    SP - 681

    EP - 684

    JO - Spine

    JF - Spine

    SN - 0362-2436

    IS - 6

    ER -