Doctoral students' writing profiles and their relations to well-being and perceptions of the academic environment

Kirsti Lonka, Elina Ketonen, Jenna Vekkaila, María Cerrato Lara, Kirsi Pyhältö

Tutkimustuotos: ArtikkelijulkaisuArtikkeliTieteellinenvertaisarvioitu

Kuvaus

We explored doctoral students’ writing profiles using a person-centred approach. We also studied differences between profiles in terms of experienced well-being and perceptions of the learning environment. The participants of our study (n = 664) were PhD students from three faculties at the University of Helsinki, Finland. The Writing Process Questionnaire (Lonka et al. Journal of Writing Research, 5(3), 245-269 2014) was used to measure writing conceptions and problematic writing. Well-being was measured by MED NORD, adapted to the doctoral context (Lonka et al. Medical Teacher, 30, 72-79 2008; Stubb et al. Studies in Continuing Education, 33(1), 33–50 2011), and Perceptions of the learning environment, using specific items from Dahlin et al. Medical Education, 39, 594–604 (2005). PhD students with similar patterns of writing variables were identified through latent profile analysis (LPA). We conducted one-way ANOVAs to examine group differences with respect to well-being and perceptions of learning environment. We identified three writing profiles: Growth-Transforming (51%), Ambivalent (40%), and Fixed-Blocking (9%) groups. The Fixed-Blocking group reported a lack of interest the most often and also reported receiving the least feedback. The Growth-Transforming group was the most and the Fixed-Blocking group the least satisfied with their studies. It appeared that epistemic beliefs related to research writing were most decisive in differentiation among PhD students. Blocks were related to beliefs in innate ability. We concluded that although problems in writing are quite common, epistemic beliefs may be even more decisive in terms of successful research writing.
Alkuperäiskielienglanti
LehtiHigher Education
Vuosikerta77
Numero4
Sivut587-602
Sivumäärä16
ISSN0018-1560
DOI - pysyväislinkit
TilaJulkaistu - huhtikuuta 2019
OKM-julkaisutyyppiA1 Alkuperäisartikkeli tieteellisessä aikakauslehdessä, vertaisarvioitu

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title = "Doctoral students' writing profiles and their relations to well-being and perceptions of the academic environment",
abstract = "We explored doctoral students’ writing profiles using a person-centred approach. We also studied differences between profiles in terms of experienced well-being and perceptions of the learning environment. The participants of our study (n = 664) were PhD students from three faculties at the University of Helsinki, Finland. The Writing Process Questionnaire (Lonka et al. Journal of Writing Research, 5(3), 245-269 2014) was used to measure writing conceptions and problematic writing. Well-being was measured by MED NORD, adapted to the doctoral context (Lonka et al. Medical Teacher, 30, 72-79 2008; Stubb et al. Studies in Continuing Education, 33(1), 33–50 2011), and Perceptions of the learning environment, using specific items from Dahlin et al. Medical Education, 39, 594–604 (2005). PhD students with similar patterns of writing variables were identified through latent profile analysis (LPA). We conducted one-way ANOVAs to examine group differences with respect to well-being and perceptions of learning environment. We identified three writing profiles: Growth-Transforming (51{\%}), Ambivalent (40{\%}), and Fixed-Blocking (9{\%}) groups. The Fixed-Blocking group reported a lack of interest the most often and also reported receiving the least feedback. The Growth-Transforming group was the most and the Fixed-Blocking group the least satisfied with their studies. It appeared that epistemic beliefs related to research writing were most decisive in differentiation among PhD students. Blocks were related to beliefs in innate ability. We concluded that although problems in writing are quite common, epistemic beliefs may be even more decisive in terms of successful research writing.",
keywords = "Epistemic, Beliefs, Research, Writing, Latent profile analysis, LPA, Doctoral students, PhD, MEDICAL-STUDENTS, PROCRASTINATION, COMMUNITIES, SUPERVISORS, TRANSITION, ENGAGEMENT, ATTRITION, EMOTIONS, STRESS, HEALTH, 516 Educational sciences",
author = "Kirsti Lonka and Elina Ketonen and Jenna Vekkaila and Lara, {Mar{\'i}a Cerrato} and Kirsi Pyh{\"a}lt{\"o}",
year = "2019",
month = "4",
doi = "10.1007/s10734-018-0290-x",
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volume = "77",
pages = "587--602",
journal = "Higher Education",
issn = "0018-1560",
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Doctoral students' writing profiles and their relations to well-being and perceptions of the academic environment. / Lonka, Kirsti; Ketonen, Elina; Vekkaila, Jenna; Lara, María Cerrato; Pyhältö, Kirsi.

julkaisussa: Higher Education, Vuosikerta 77, Nro 4, 04.2019, s. 587-602.

Tutkimustuotos: ArtikkelijulkaisuArtikkeliTieteellinenvertaisarvioitu

TY - JOUR

T1 - Doctoral students' writing profiles and their relations to well-being and perceptions of the academic environment

AU - Lonka, Kirsti

AU - Ketonen, Elina

AU - Vekkaila, Jenna

AU - Lara, María Cerrato

AU - Pyhältö, Kirsi

PY - 2019/4

Y1 - 2019/4

N2 - We explored doctoral students’ writing profiles using a person-centred approach. We also studied differences between profiles in terms of experienced well-being and perceptions of the learning environment. The participants of our study (n = 664) were PhD students from three faculties at the University of Helsinki, Finland. The Writing Process Questionnaire (Lonka et al. Journal of Writing Research, 5(3), 245-269 2014) was used to measure writing conceptions and problematic writing. Well-being was measured by MED NORD, adapted to the doctoral context (Lonka et al. Medical Teacher, 30, 72-79 2008; Stubb et al. Studies in Continuing Education, 33(1), 33–50 2011), and Perceptions of the learning environment, using specific items from Dahlin et al. Medical Education, 39, 594–604 (2005). PhD students with similar patterns of writing variables were identified through latent profile analysis (LPA). We conducted one-way ANOVAs to examine group differences with respect to well-being and perceptions of learning environment. We identified three writing profiles: Growth-Transforming (51%), Ambivalent (40%), and Fixed-Blocking (9%) groups. The Fixed-Blocking group reported a lack of interest the most often and also reported receiving the least feedback. The Growth-Transforming group was the most and the Fixed-Blocking group the least satisfied with their studies. It appeared that epistemic beliefs related to research writing were most decisive in differentiation among PhD students. Blocks were related to beliefs in innate ability. We concluded that although problems in writing are quite common, epistemic beliefs may be even more decisive in terms of successful research writing.

AB - We explored doctoral students’ writing profiles using a person-centred approach. We also studied differences between profiles in terms of experienced well-being and perceptions of the learning environment. The participants of our study (n = 664) were PhD students from three faculties at the University of Helsinki, Finland. The Writing Process Questionnaire (Lonka et al. Journal of Writing Research, 5(3), 245-269 2014) was used to measure writing conceptions and problematic writing. Well-being was measured by MED NORD, adapted to the doctoral context (Lonka et al. Medical Teacher, 30, 72-79 2008; Stubb et al. Studies in Continuing Education, 33(1), 33–50 2011), and Perceptions of the learning environment, using specific items from Dahlin et al. Medical Education, 39, 594–604 (2005). PhD students with similar patterns of writing variables were identified through latent profile analysis (LPA). We conducted one-way ANOVAs to examine group differences with respect to well-being and perceptions of learning environment. We identified three writing profiles: Growth-Transforming (51%), Ambivalent (40%), and Fixed-Blocking (9%) groups. The Fixed-Blocking group reported a lack of interest the most often and also reported receiving the least feedback. The Growth-Transforming group was the most and the Fixed-Blocking group the least satisfied with their studies. It appeared that epistemic beliefs related to research writing were most decisive in differentiation among PhD students. Blocks were related to beliefs in innate ability. We concluded that although problems in writing are quite common, epistemic beliefs may be even more decisive in terms of successful research writing.

KW - Epistemic

KW - Beliefs

KW - Research

KW - Writing

KW - Latent profile analysis

KW - LPA

KW - Doctoral students

KW - PhD

KW - MEDICAL-STUDENTS

KW - PROCRASTINATION

KW - COMMUNITIES

KW - SUPERVISORS

KW - TRANSITION

KW - ENGAGEMENT

KW - ATTRITION

KW - EMOTIONS

KW - STRESS

KW - HEALTH

KW - 516 Educational sciences

U2 - 10.1007/s10734-018-0290-x

DO - 10.1007/s10734-018-0290-x

M3 - Article

VL - 77

SP - 587

EP - 602

JO - Higher Education

JF - Higher Education

SN - 0018-1560

IS - 4

ER -