Electoral Systems in Context: Finland

Tutkimustuotos: Artikkeli kirjassa/raportissa/konferenssijulkaisussaKirjan luku tai artikkeliTieteellinenvertaisarvioitu

Kuvaus

In the family of proportional electoral systems, Finland makes a rare flower by combining a proportional formula and multimember districts1 with fully open lists and mandatory preferential voting. Open- list proportional representation (OLPR) provides the Finnish electoral system with two levels of competition. In line with Duverger’s law (1954), the proportional formula applied in multimember districts has generated a multiparty system, which in turn involves a high degree of interparty competition. Finnish elections, as elections in most Western European countries, are fought between parties (or alliances of parties), and the allocation of seats across parties determines how power is distributed and used in the parliament. The open lists and mandatory preferential voting features do, however, also provide the system with a high degree of intraparty competition. Alongside the constituency- based battle between parties, candidates within the same party compete over the seats that the party collectively will win. This inherent duality has a multitude of effects on how elections are played out at different levels of the political system. It has consequences for the nomination of candidates, for how campaigns are fought and elections won, and for the behavior and attitudes of voters, politicians, and parties, just to name a few. The effects of this duality and in particular how the high degree of intraparty competition influences the political logic of Finnish politics will be explored later on in this chapter after a thorough presentation of the basic features of the electoral system.
Alkuperäiskielienglanti
OtsikkoThe Oxford Handbook of Electoral Systems
ToimittajatErik S. Herron, Robert J. Pekkanen, Matthew S. Shugart
JulkaisupaikkaNew York
KustantajaOxford University Press
Julkaisupäivä2018
Sivut601-626
ISBN (painettu)9780190258658
DOI - pysyväislinkit
TilaJulkaistu - 2018
Julkaistu ulkoisestiKyllä
OKM-julkaisutyyppiA3 Kirjan tai muun kokoomateoksen osa

Julkaisusarja

NimiOxford Handbooks

Tieteenalat

  • 517 Valtio-oppi, hallintotiede

Lainaa tätä

von Schoultz, Å. A-L. (2018). Electoral Systems in Context: Finland. teoksessa E. S. Herron, R. J. Pekkanen, & M. S. Shugart (Toimittajat), The Oxford Handbook of Electoral Systems (Sivut 601-626). (Oxford Handbooks). New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780190258658.013.42
von Schoultz, Åsa Ann-Louise. / Electoral Systems in Context : Finland. The Oxford Handbook of Electoral Systems. Toimittaja / Erik S. Herron ; Robert J. Pekkanen ; Matthew S. Shugart. New York : Oxford University Press, 2018. Sivut 601-626 (Oxford Handbooks).
@inbook{241ef85ab1fe4c7090e4077506508e50,
title = "Electoral Systems in Context: Finland",
abstract = "In the family of proportional electoral systems, Finland makes a rare flower by combining a proportional formula and multimember districts1 with fully open lists and mandatory preferential voting. Open- list proportional representation (OLPR) provides the Finnish electoral system with two levels of competition. In line with Duverger’s law (1954), the proportional formula applied in multimember districts has generated a multiparty system, which in turn involves a high degree of interparty competition. Finnish elections, as elections in most Western European countries, are fought between parties (or alliances of parties), and the allocation of seats across parties determines how power is distributed and used in the parliament. The open lists and mandatory preferential voting features do, however, also provide the system with a high degree of intraparty competition. Alongside the constituency- based battle between parties, candidates within the same party compete over the seats that the party collectively will win. This inherent duality has a multitude of effects on how elections are played out at different levels of the political system. It has consequences for the nomination of candidates, for how campaigns are fought and elections won, and for the behavior and attitudes of voters, politicians, and parties, just to name a few. The effects of this duality and in particular how the high degree of intraparty competition influences the political logic of Finnish politics will be explored later on in this chapter after a thorough presentation of the basic features of the electoral system.",
keywords = "517 Political science",
author = "{von Schoultz}, {{\AA}sa Ann-Louise}",
year = "2018",
doi = "10.1093/oxfordhb/9780190258658.013.42",
language = "English",
isbn = "9780190258658",
series = "Oxford Handbooks",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",
pages = "601--626",
editor = "Herron, {Erik S.} and Pekkanen, {Robert J.} and Shugart, {Matthew S.}",
booktitle = "The Oxford Handbook of Electoral Systems",
address = "United Kingdom",

}

von Schoultz, ÅA-L 2018, Electoral Systems in Context: Finland. julkaisussa ES Herron, RJ Pekkanen & MS Shugart (toim), The Oxford Handbook of Electoral Systems. Oxford Handbooks, Oxford University Press, New York, Sivut 601-626. https://doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780190258658.013.42

Electoral Systems in Context : Finland. / von Schoultz, Åsa Ann-Louise.

The Oxford Handbook of Electoral Systems. toim. / Erik S. Herron; Robert J. Pekkanen; Matthew S. Shugart. New York : Oxford University Press, 2018. s. 601-626 (Oxford Handbooks).

Tutkimustuotos: Artikkeli kirjassa/raportissa/konferenssijulkaisussaKirjan luku tai artikkeliTieteellinenvertaisarvioitu

TY - CHAP

T1 - Electoral Systems in Context

T2 - Finland

AU - von Schoultz, Åsa Ann-Louise

PY - 2018

Y1 - 2018

N2 - In the family of proportional electoral systems, Finland makes a rare flower by combining a proportional formula and multimember districts1 with fully open lists and mandatory preferential voting. Open- list proportional representation (OLPR) provides the Finnish electoral system with two levels of competition. In line with Duverger’s law (1954), the proportional formula applied in multimember districts has generated a multiparty system, which in turn involves a high degree of interparty competition. Finnish elections, as elections in most Western European countries, are fought between parties (or alliances of parties), and the allocation of seats across parties determines how power is distributed and used in the parliament. The open lists and mandatory preferential voting features do, however, also provide the system with a high degree of intraparty competition. Alongside the constituency- based battle between parties, candidates within the same party compete over the seats that the party collectively will win. This inherent duality has a multitude of effects on how elections are played out at different levels of the political system. It has consequences for the nomination of candidates, for how campaigns are fought and elections won, and for the behavior and attitudes of voters, politicians, and parties, just to name a few. The effects of this duality and in particular how the high degree of intraparty competition influences the political logic of Finnish politics will be explored later on in this chapter after a thorough presentation of the basic features of the electoral system.

AB - In the family of proportional electoral systems, Finland makes a rare flower by combining a proportional formula and multimember districts1 with fully open lists and mandatory preferential voting. Open- list proportional representation (OLPR) provides the Finnish electoral system with two levels of competition. In line with Duverger’s law (1954), the proportional formula applied in multimember districts has generated a multiparty system, which in turn involves a high degree of interparty competition. Finnish elections, as elections in most Western European countries, are fought between parties (or alliances of parties), and the allocation of seats across parties determines how power is distributed and used in the parliament. The open lists and mandatory preferential voting features do, however, also provide the system with a high degree of intraparty competition. Alongside the constituency- based battle between parties, candidates within the same party compete over the seats that the party collectively will win. This inherent duality has a multitude of effects on how elections are played out at different levels of the political system. It has consequences for the nomination of candidates, for how campaigns are fought and elections won, and for the behavior and attitudes of voters, politicians, and parties, just to name a few. The effects of this duality and in particular how the high degree of intraparty competition influences the political logic of Finnish politics will be explored later on in this chapter after a thorough presentation of the basic features of the electoral system.

KW - 517 Political science

U2 - 10.1093/oxfordhb/9780190258658.013.42

DO - 10.1093/oxfordhb/9780190258658.013.42

M3 - Chapter

SN - 9780190258658

T3 - Oxford Handbooks

SP - 601

EP - 626

BT - The Oxford Handbook of Electoral Systems

A2 - Herron, Erik S.

A2 - Pekkanen, Robert J.

A2 - Shugart, Matthew S.

PB - Oxford University Press

CY - New York

ER -

von Schoultz ÅA-L. Electoral Systems in Context: Finland. julkaisussa Herron ES, Pekkanen RJ, Shugart MS, toimittajat, The Oxford Handbook of Electoral Systems. New York: Oxford University Press. 2018. s. 601-626. (Oxford Handbooks). https://doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780190258658.013.42