Event of the Radically New: Revelation in the Theology of Walter Kasper

Tutkimustuotos: OpinnäyteVäitöskirjaMonografia

Kuvaus

The present study analyses the concept of revelation in the theology of Walter Kasper (b. 1933). The method of the study is systematic analysis, which focuses on ascertaining the commonalities, characteristics and possible inconsistencies in Kasper’s thought. The sources for this study consist of works pertinent to the subject in the corpus of Kasper’s writings from 1965 to 2015.

In order to offer a full account of Kasper’s understanding of revelation, this study analyses the philosophical and theological background of his thought. The present study outlines and discusses Kasper’s interpretation of the doctrine of revelation, his understanding of how the Bible should be interpreted and his dogmatic method. This study also discusses Kasper’s understanding of the meaning of revelation in the modern era. In line with previous studies of Kasper’s theology also this study concludes that the three influences that have most affected Kasper’s thought are: German idealist philosophy, the Tübingen School and the Second Vatican Council.

This study argues that Kasper’s conception of revelation is dynamic and dialogical. With the help of the concepts of German idealist philosophy, especially that of F.W.J Schelling, Kasper sketches a model of revelation theology based on the idea that, precisely because the human being is finite, he is able to conceive that there must lie an infinite ground that is the ground of being of all reality. In the meaning event (Sinnerfahrung) the human being realises that his or her ground of being must lie in infinite reality. The human being’s true freedom can only be fulfilled in connection to God, who is himself perfect freedom. This study argues that this basic philosophical framework can open possibilities for dialogue with other world views as well.

Kasper argues that the Trinitarian God abides in relation (Father, Son and the Holy Spirit), and the immanent reality of the Trinitarian God is thus reflected in the Creation. As God’s creation and God’s image, human beings are intended to be in dialogue, both with God and with other human beings. In his self-revelation God gives his promise: he will be with his people always. In the Exodus narrative this promise culminates in the event of the burning bush, in which God gives his Name to Moses (Ex 3,14). In the New Testament literature the promise finds its fulfilment in the Incarnation.

The title of this study is Event of the Radically New. The most important observation concerning the modern, post-Vatican II Catholic understanding of theology of revelation is that revelation consists not only of information but rather that it is primarily an event. It is an event in which God reveals himself anew in each particular historical era. It is radical in the sense that it brings something completely new and completely transforming to our reality. As well, it is radical because it reflects the eternal spirit of the Gospel, the roots (radices) of Christian faith. Thus, paradoxically, revelation is at the same time radically eternal and radically new, open to the future. Kasper’s theology of revelation culminates in Christology. The truth of the Christian faith, the truth that shapes and renews our reality, is the incarnate Word of God, our Saviour, Jesus Christ.

In Christ’s full humanity the mystery of the meaning of being human is solved once and for all. Christ is God’s freedom, love and mercy incarnate. He is the answer to all search for meaning. In him, reality is interpreted in a completely new, illuminating light. In Christ the majestic quality of God’s being (grace, Gnade), appears in human history as mercy (Barmherzigkeit). In Jesus Christ, Christians find the fulfilment of their yearning for a new, meaningful experience: a fulfilment that modern man so determinedly, but in vain, tries to find in immanent reality.
Alkuperäiskielienglanti
Myöntävä instituutio
  • Helsingin yliopisto
Myöntöpäivämäärä13 huhtikuuta 2016
JulkaisupaikkaHelsinki
Kustantaja
Painoksen ISBN978-951-51-2045-8
Sähköinen ISBN978-951-51-2046-5
TilaJulkaistu - 29 maaliskuuta 2016
OKM-julkaisutyyppiG4 Tohtorinväitöskirja (monografia)

Tieteenalat

  • 614 Teologia

Lainaa tätä

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abstract = "The present study analyses the concept of revelation in the theology of Walter Kasper (b. 1933). The method of the study is systematic analysis, which focuses on ascertaining the commonalities, characteristics and possible inconsistencies in Kasper’s thought. The sources for this study consist of works pertinent to the subject in the corpus of Kasper’s writings from 1965 to 2015.In order to offer a full account of Kasper’s understanding of revelation, this study analyses the philosophical and theological background of his thought. The present study outlines and discusses Kasper’s interpretation of the doctrine of revelation, his understanding of how the Bible should be interpreted and his dogmatic method. This study also discusses Kasper’s understanding of the meaning of revelation in the modern era. In line with previous studies of Kasper’s theology also this study concludes that the three influences that have most affected Kasper’s thought are: German idealist philosophy, the T{\"u}bingen School and the Second Vatican Council.This study argues that Kasper’s conception of revelation is dynamic and dialogical. With the help of the concepts of German idealist philosophy, especially that of F.W.J Schelling, Kasper sketches a model of revelation theology based on the idea that, precisely because the human being is finite, he is able to conceive that there must lie an infinite ground that is the ground of being of all reality. In the meaning event (Sinnerfahrung) the human being realises that his or her ground of being must lie in infinite reality. The human being’s true freedom can only be fulfilled in connection to God, who is himself perfect freedom. This study argues that this basic philosophical framework can open possibilities for dialogue with other world views as well.Kasper argues that the Trinitarian God abides in relation (Father, Son and the Holy Spirit), and the immanent reality of the Trinitarian God is thus reflected in the Creation. As God’s creation and God’s image, human beings are intended to be in dialogue, both with God and with other human beings. In his self-revelation God gives his promise: he will be with his people always. In the Exodus narrative this promise culminates in the event of the burning bush, in which God gives his Name to Moses (Ex 3,14). In the New Testament literature the promise finds its fulfilment in the Incarnation.The title of this study is Event of the Radically New. The most important observation concerning the modern, post-Vatican II Catholic understanding of theology of revelation is that revelation consists not only of information but rather that it is primarily an event. It is an event in which God reveals himself anew in each particular historical era. It is radical in the sense that it brings something completely new and completely transforming to our reality. As well, it is radical because it reflects the eternal spirit of the Gospel, the roots (radices) of Christian faith. Thus, paradoxically, revelation is at the same time radically eternal and radically new, open to the future. Kasper’s theology of revelation culminates in Christology. The truth of the Christian faith, the truth that shapes and renews our reality, is the incarnate Word of God, our Saviour, Jesus Christ.In Christ’s full humanity the mystery of the meaning of being human is solved once and for all. Christ is God’s freedom, love and mercy incarnate. He is the answer to all search for meaning. In him, reality is interpreted in a completely new, illuminating light. In Christ the majestic quality of God’s being (grace, Gnade), appears in human history as mercy (Barmherzigkeit). In Jesus Christ, Christians find the fulfilment of their yearning for a new, meaningful experience: a fulfilment that modern man so determinedly, but in vain, tries to find in immanent reality.",
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Event of the Radically New: Revelation in the Theology of Walter Kasper. / Huhtanen, Tiina Marja Sisko.

Helsinki : University of Helsinki, 2016. 243 s.

Tutkimustuotos: OpinnäyteVäitöskirjaMonografia

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AU - Huhtanen, Tiina Marja Sisko

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N2 - The present study analyses the concept of revelation in the theology of Walter Kasper (b. 1933). The method of the study is systematic analysis, which focuses on ascertaining the commonalities, characteristics and possible inconsistencies in Kasper’s thought. The sources for this study consist of works pertinent to the subject in the corpus of Kasper’s writings from 1965 to 2015.In order to offer a full account of Kasper’s understanding of revelation, this study analyses the philosophical and theological background of his thought. The present study outlines and discusses Kasper’s interpretation of the doctrine of revelation, his understanding of how the Bible should be interpreted and his dogmatic method. This study also discusses Kasper’s understanding of the meaning of revelation in the modern era. In line with previous studies of Kasper’s theology also this study concludes that the three influences that have most affected Kasper’s thought are: German idealist philosophy, the Tübingen School and the Second Vatican Council.This study argues that Kasper’s conception of revelation is dynamic and dialogical. With the help of the concepts of German idealist philosophy, especially that of F.W.J Schelling, Kasper sketches a model of revelation theology based on the idea that, precisely because the human being is finite, he is able to conceive that there must lie an infinite ground that is the ground of being of all reality. In the meaning event (Sinnerfahrung) the human being realises that his or her ground of being must lie in infinite reality. The human being’s true freedom can only be fulfilled in connection to God, who is himself perfect freedom. This study argues that this basic philosophical framework can open possibilities for dialogue with other world views as well.Kasper argues that the Trinitarian God abides in relation (Father, Son and the Holy Spirit), and the immanent reality of the Trinitarian God is thus reflected in the Creation. As God’s creation and God’s image, human beings are intended to be in dialogue, both with God and with other human beings. In his self-revelation God gives his promise: he will be with his people always. In the Exodus narrative this promise culminates in the event of the burning bush, in which God gives his Name to Moses (Ex 3,14). In the New Testament literature the promise finds its fulfilment in the Incarnation.The title of this study is Event of the Radically New. The most important observation concerning the modern, post-Vatican II Catholic understanding of theology of revelation is that revelation consists not only of information but rather that it is primarily an event. It is an event in which God reveals himself anew in each particular historical era. It is radical in the sense that it brings something completely new and completely transforming to our reality. As well, it is radical because it reflects the eternal spirit of the Gospel, the roots (radices) of Christian faith. Thus, paradoxically, revelation is at the same time radically eternal and radically new, open to the future. Kasper’s theology of revelation culminates in Christology. The truth of the Christian faith, the truth that shapes and renews our reality, is the incarnate Word of God, our Saviour, Jesus Christ.In Christ’s full humanity the mystery of the meaning of being human is solved once and for all. Christ is God’s freedom, love and mercy incarnate. He is the answer to all search for meaning. In him, reality is interpreted in a completely new, illuminating light. In Christ the majestic quality of God’s being (grace, Gnade), appears in human history as mercy (Barmherzigkeit). In Jesus Christ, Christians find the fulfilment of their yearning for a new, meaningful experience: a fulfilment that modern man so determinedly, but in vain, tries to find in immanent reality.

AB - The present study analyses the concept of revelation in the theology of Walter Kasper (b. 1933). The method of the study is systematic analysis, which focuses on ascertaining the commonalities, characteristics and possible inconsistencies in Kasper’s thought. The sources for this study consist of works pertinent to the subject in the corpus of Kasper’s writings from 1965 to 2015.In order to offer a full account of Kasper’s understanding of revelation, this study analyses the philosophical and theological background of his thought. The present study outlines and discusses Kasper’s interpretation of the doctrine of revelation, his understanding of how the Bible should be interpreted and his dogmatic method. This study also discusses Kasper’s understanding of the meaning of revelation in the modern era. In line with previous studies of Kasper’s theology also this study concludes that the three influences that have most affected Kasper’s thought are: German idealist philosophy, the Tübingen School and the Second Vatican Council.This study argues that Kasper’s conception of revelation is dynamic and dialogical. With the help of the concepts of German idealist philosophy, especially that of F.W.J Schelling, Kasper sketches a model of revelation theology based on the idea that, precisely because the human being is finite, he is able to conceive that there must lie an infinite ground that is the ground of being of all reality. In the meaning event (Sinnerfahrung) the human being realises that his or her ground of being must lie in infinite reality. The human being’s true freedom can only be fulfilled in connection to God, who is himself perfect freedom. This study argues that this basic philosophical framework can open possibilities for dialogue with other world views as well.Kasper argues that the Trinitarian God abides in relation (Father, Son and the Holy Spirit), and the immanent reality of the Trinitarian God is thus reflected in the Creation. As God’s creation and God’s image, human beings are intended to be in dialogue, both with God and with other human beings. In his self-revelation God gives his promise: he will be with his people always. In the Exodus narrative this promise culminates in the event of the burning bush, in which God gives his Name to Moses (Ex 3,14). In the New Testament literature the promise finds its fulfilment in the Incarnation.The title of this study is Event of the Radically New. The most important observation concerning the modern, post-Vatican II Catholic understanding of theology of revelation is that revelation consists not only of information but rather that it is primarily an event. It is an event in which God reveals himself anew in each particular historical era. It is radical in the sense that it brings something completely new and completely transforming to our reality. As well, it is radical because it reflects the eternal spirit of the Gospel, the roots (radices) of Christian faith. Thus, paradoxically, revelation is at the same time radically eternal and radically new, open to the future. Kasper’s theology of revelation culminates in Christology. The truth of the Christian faith, the truth that shapes and renews our reality, is the incarnate Word of God, our Saviour, Jesus Christ.In Christ’s full humanity the mystery of the meaning of being human is solved once and for all. Christ is God’s freedom, love and mercy incarnate. He is the answer to all search for meaning. In him, reality is interpreted in a completely new, illuminating light. In Christ the majestic quality of God’s being (grace, Gnade), appears in human history as mercy (Barmherzigkeit). In Jesus Christ, Christians find the fulfilment of their yearning for a new, meaningful experience: a fulfilment that modern man so determinedly, but in vain, tries to find in immanent reality.

KW - 614 Theology

M3 - Doctoral Thesis

SN - 978-951-51-2045-8

VL - 2016

PB - University of Helsinki

CY - Helsinki

ER -