Forests, peaceful and inclusive societies, reduced inequality, education, and inclusive institutions at all levels: Background study prepared for the fourteenth session of the United Nations Forum on Forests

Monica Gabay, Mika Rekola

Tutkimustuotos: Kirja/raporttiTutkimusraportti

Kuvaus

This substantive background paper presents an overview of the challenges, opportunities and priorities to enhance contributions of forests to the achievement of SDG4, 10, 16 and relevant GFGs as well as the relevant
policy measures under article V paragraph 6 of the UN Forest Instrument. The key messages are:
1. Small-scale and community forestry foster equitable and inclusive development
Governments should enact a simplified regulatory framework for small-scale and community forestry that incentives local added value and investments in sustainable forest management including simplified management
plans and tax regimes, fiscal stability and tax deductions, and infrastructure to facilitate market access. Technical support, capacity building (organizational, technical, financial, commercial) and inclusive finance are key in
catalysing local small-holders and community forestry initiatives.
2. More effort is needed to advance gender equality and youth engagement
Governments should mainstream gender and youth perspective into policies, support women-led businesses, peer-to-peer mentoring, business incubation, networks and partnerships at the national and regional
level, and enable spaces and channels for dialogue including digital technology.
3. Secure forest tenure and access rights have a positive impact on local livelihoods and equality and provision of ecosystem services
Governments should promote the cadastral registration of community land tenure arrangements and customary rights and enforce women’s forest land tenure and access rights by means of awareness raising,
leadership development and operationalisation of constitutional provisions. Resilient provision of ecosystem goods and services could benefit from flexible and agile payment for ecosystem services (PES) systems rewarding
forest stewards’ contributions and ensuring their financial sustainability through predictable sources of revenue such as fiscal instruments, blended finance and support to CSO initiatives (e.g. crowdfunding).
4. Networking and cooperation are key to meet global and regional challenges
Improved networking is needed in order to efficiently meet the global challenges for forestry. At global level a working group within International Collaborative Partnership on Forests is required. International congress
on forest education is appropriate to exchange ideas and enhance networking. Strengthen regional and subregional cooperation to meet needs for education, especially teachers’ trainings and education networks
5. Development of forest education requires research, innovation and learning
Forest education needs evidence based innovative solutions similar to any other sector. Research on education requires scientific establishment such as international associations and journals. Research is a necessity
on curricula needs, pedagogical methods, teaching materials and high-tech teaching and learning innovations. Forest educators need both theoretical pedagogical training and possibilities to familiarize themselves with the
forestry practices. 6. Forest education should meet decision makers and provide life-long learning opportunities for professionals
Executive training for decision makers can provide efficient policy results. Training courses consist of highlevel lectures, excursions, discussions and networking. Establishing MBA type master's degree for those
professionals not having background in forestry is an efficient solution for Life-long learning.
7. Forest education needs public engagement and empowering vulnerable groups. There is a need for new ways of providing forest knowledge to non-expert and people who are vulnerable. Entrepreneurship programmes for elementary education provide useful basics for forestry and other branches of
economy. Social learning, informal learning and nano degrees can reach easier than before new groups of learners. There is also a need for new scholarship programmes for students coming from developing countries.
8. Ensure responsible, inclusive and transparent forest institutions for democratic decision-making. Governments should enable policy dialogue spaces and forest stakeholders’ participation in decisionmaking processes ensuring inclusion of vulnerable groups including women and youth. Decentralisation provides an opportunity to advance democratic involvement of local communities in sustainable forest management. Governments should secure a level playing field and transparency in land planning processes.
9. Address challenges in forest governance and foster timber legality
Governments should adopt robust legal frameworks and provide for their effective enforcement to curb illegal logging and trade. The EU FLEGT initiative provides a strong blueprint that should be advanced by mobilising
partnerships for development in the terms of SDG 17. Forest voluntary certification systems, labelling and codes of conduct are valuable measures to enhance sustainable forest management, provided they are combined with
consumer awareness.
10. Access to public information improves institutional quality and accountability
Governments should implement Open Government Data policies to advance transparency and accountability, create awareness and enhance social innovation. Moreover, governments should develop effective monitoring and accountability mechanisms including policy research and critical data generation as an input for evidence-based policy making, impact evaluation and adjustment. The adoption of institutional performance measurement through a results-based approach and the implementation of key performance indicators will enhance institutional quality.
Alkuperäiskielienglanti
KustantajaUnited Nations
Sivumäärä89
TilaJulkaistu - 1 maaliskuuta 2019
OKM-julkaisutyyppiD4 Julkaistu kehittämis- tai tutkimusraportti taikka -selvitys

Tieteenalat

  • 4112 Metsätiede

Lainaa tätä

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title = "Forests, peaceful and inclusive societies, reduced inequality, education, and inclusive institutions at all levels: Background study prepared for the fourteenth session of the United Nations Forum on Forests",
abstract = "This substantive background paper presents an overview of the challenges, opportunities and priorities to enhance contributions of forests to the achievement of SDG4, 10, 16 and relevant GFGs as well as the relevantpolicy measures under article V paragraph 6 of the UN Forest Instrument. The key messages are:1. Small-scale and community forestry foster equitable and inclusive developmentGovernments should enact a simplified regulatory framework for small-scale and community forestry that incentives local added value and investments in sustainable forest management including simplified managementplans and tax regimes, fiscal stability and tax deductions, and infrastructure to facilitate market access. Technical support, capacity building (organizational, technical, financial, commercial) and inclusive finance are key incatalysing local small-holders and community forestry initiatives.2. More effort is needed to advance gender equality and youth engagementGovernments should mainstream gender and youth perspective into policies, support women-led businesses, peer-to-peer mentoring, business incubation, networks and partnerships at the national and regionallevel, and enable spaces and channels for dialogue including digital technology.3. Secure forest tenure and access rights have a positive impact on local livelihoods and equality and provision of ecosystem servicesGovernments should promote the cadastral registration of community land tenure arrangements and customary rights and enforce women’s forest land tenure and access rights by means of awareness raising,leadership development and operationalisation of constitutional provisions. Resilient provision of ecosystem goods and services could benefit from flexible and agile payment for ecosystem services (PES) systems rewardingforest stewards’ contributions and ensuring their financial sustainability through predictable sources of revenue such as fiscal instruments, blended finance and support to CSO initiatives (e.g. crowdfunding).4. Networking and cooperation are key to meet global and regional challengesImproved networking is needed in order to efficiently meet the global challenges for forestry. At global level a working group within International Collaborative Partnership on Forests is required. International congresson forest education is appropriate to exchange ideas and enhance networking. Strengthen regional and subregional cooperation to meet needs for education, especially teachers’ trainings and education networks5. Development of forest education requires research, innovation and learningForest education needs evidence based innovative solutions similar to any other sector. Research on education requires scientific establishment such as international associations and journals. Research is a necessityon curricula needs, pedagogical methods, teaching materials and high-tech teaching and learning innovations. Forest educators need both theoretical pedagogical training and possibilities to familiarize themselves with theforestry practices. 6. Forest education should meet decision makers and provide life-long learning opportunities for professionalsExecutive training for decision makers can provide efficient policy results. Training courses consist of highlevel lectures, excursions, discussions and networking. Establishing MBA type master's degree for thoseprofessionals not having background in forestry is an efficient solution for Life-long learning. 7. Forest education needs public engagement and empowering vulnerable groups. There is a need for new ways of providing forest knowledge to non-expert and people who are vulnerable. Entrepreneurship programmes for elementary education provide useful basics for forestry and other branches ofeconomy. Social learning, informal learning and nano degrees can reach easier than before new groups of learners. There is also a need for new scholarship programmes for students coming from developing countries.8. Ensure responsible, inclusive and transparent forest institutions for democratic decision-making. Governments should enable policy dialogue spaces and forest stakeholders’ participation in decisionmaking processes ensuring inclusion of vulnerable groups including women and youth. Decentralisation provides an opportunity to advance democratic involvement of local communities in sustainable forest management. Governments should secure a level playing field and transparency in land planning processes.9. Address challenges in forest governance and foster timber legalityGovernments should adopt robust legal frameworks and provide for their effective enforcement to curb illegal logging and trade. The EU FLEGT initiative provides a strong blueprint that should be advanced by mobilisingpartnerships for development in the terms of SDG 17. Forest voluntary certification systems, labelling and codes of conduct are valuable measures to enhance sustainable forest management, provided they are combined withconsumer awareness.10. Access to public information improves institutional quality and accountabilityGovernments should implement Open Government Data policies to advance transparency and accountability, create awareness and enhance social innovation. Moreover, governments should develop effective monitoring and accountability mechanisms including policy research and critical data generation as an input for evidence-based policy making, impact evaluation and adjustment. The adoption of institutional performance measurement through a results-based approach and the implementation of key performance indicators will enhance institutional quality.",
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N2 - This substantive background paper presents an overview of the challenges, opportunities and priorities to enhance contributions of forests to the achievement of SDG4, 10, 16 and relevant GFGs as well as the relevantpolicy measures under article V paragraph 6 of the UN Forest Instrument. The key messages are:1. Small-scale and community forestry foster equitable and inclusive developmentGovernments should enact a simplified regulatory framework for small-scale and community forestry that incentives local added value and investments in sustainable forest management including simplified managementplans and tax regimes, fiscal stability and tax deductions, and infrastructure to facilitate market access. Technical support, capacity building (organizational, technical, financial, commercial) and inclusive finance are key incatalysing local small-holders and community forestry initiatives.2. More effort is needed to advance gender equality and youth engagementGovernments should mainstream gender and youth perspective into policies, support women-led businesses, peer-to-peer mentoring, business incubation, networks and partnerships at the national and regionallevel, and enable spaces and channels for dialogue including digital technology.3. Secure forest tenure and access rights have a positive impact on local livelihoods and equality and provision of ecosystem servicesGovernments should promote the cadastral registration of community land tenure arrangements and customary rights and enforce women’s forest land tenure and access rights by means of awareness raising,leadership development and operationalisation of constitutional provisions. Resilient provision of ecosystem goods and services could benefit from flexible and agile payment for ecosystem services (PES) systems rewardingforest stewards’ contributions and ensuring their financial sustainability through predictable sources of revenue such as fiscal instruments, blended finance and support to CSO initiatives (e.g. crowdfunding).4. Networking and cooperation are key to meet global and regional challengesImproved networking is needed in order to efficiently meet the global challenges for forestry. At global level a working group within International Collaborative Partnership on Forests is required. International congresson forest education is appropriate to exchange ideas and enhance networking. Strengthen regional and subregional cooperation to meet needs for education, especially teachers’ trainings and education networks5. Development of forest education requires research, innovation and learningForest education needs evidence based innovative solutions similar to any other sector. Research on education requires scientific establishment such as international associations and journals. Research is a necessityon curricula needs, pedagogical methods, teaching materials and high-tech teaching and learning innovations. Forest educators need both theoretical pedagogical training and possibilities to familiarize themselves with theforestry practices. 6. Forest education should meet decision makers and provide life-long learning opportunities for professionalsExecutive training for decision makers can provide efficient policy results. Training courses consist of highlevel lectures, excursions, discussions and networking. Establishing MBA type master's degree for thoseprofessionals not having background in forestry is an efficient solution for Life-long learning. 7. Forest education needs public engagement and empowering vulnerable groups. There is a need for new ways of providing forest knowledge to non-expert and people who are vulnerable. Entrepreneurship programmes for elementary education provide useful basics for forestry and other branches ofeconomy. Social learning, informal learning and nano degrees can reach easier than before new groups of learners. There is also a need for new scholarship programmes for students coming from developing countries.8. Ensure responsible, inclusive and transparent forest institutions for democratic decision-making. Governments should enable policy dialogue spaces and forest stakeholders’ participation in decisionmaking processes ensuring inclusion of vulnerable groups including women and youth. Decentralisation provides an opportunity to advance democratic involvement of local communities in sustainable forest management. Governments should secure a level playing field and transparency in land planning processes.9. Address challenges in forest governance and foster timber legalityGovernments should adopt robust legal frameworks and provide for their effective enforcement to curb illegal logging and trade. The EU FLEGT initiative provides a strong blueprint that should be advanced by mobilisingpartnerships for development in the terms of SDG 17. Forest voluntary certification systems, labelling and codes of conduct are valuable measures to enhance sustainable forest management, provided they are combined withconsumer awareness.10. Access to public information improves institutional quality and accountabilityGovernments should implement Open Government Data policies to advance transparency and accountability, create awareness and enhance social innovation. Moreover, governments should develop effective monitoring and accountability mechanisms including policy research and critical data generation as an input for evidence-based policy making, impact evaluation and adjustment. The adoption of institutional performance measurement through a results-based approach and the implementation of key performance indicators will enhance institutional quality.

AB - This substantive background paper presents an overview of the challenges, opportunities and priorities to enhance contributions of forests to the achievement of SDG4, 10, 16 and relevant GFGs as well as the relevantpolicy measures under article V paragraph 6 of the UN Forest Instrument. The key messages are:1. Small-scale and community forestry foster equitable and inclusive developmentGovernments should enact a simplified regulatory framework for small-scale and community forestry that incentives local added value and investments in sustainable forest management including simplified managementplans and tax regimes, fiscal stability and tax deductions, and infrastructure to facilitate market access. Technical support, capacity building (organizational, technical, financial, commercial) and inclusive finance are key incatalysing local small-holders and community forestry initiatives.2. More effort is needed to advance gender equality and youth engagementGovernments should mainstream gender and youth perspective into policies, support women-led businesses, peer-to-peer mentoring, business incubation, networks and partnerships at the national and regionallevel, and enable spaces and channels for dialogue including digital technology.3. Secure forest tenure and access rights have a positive impact on local livelihoods and equality and provision of ecosystem servicesGovernments should promote the cadastral registration of community land tenure arrangements and customary rights and enforce women’s forest land tenure and access rights by means of awareness raising,leadership development and operationalisation of constitutional provisions. Resilient provision of ecosystem goods and services could benefit from flexible and agile payment for ecosystem services (PES) systems rewardingforest stewards’ contributions and ensuring their financial sustainability through predictable sources of revenue such as fiscal instruments, blended finance and support to CSO initiatives (e.g. crowdfunding).4. Networking and cooperation are key to meet global and regional challengesImproved networking is needed in order to efficiently meet the global challenges for forestry. At global level a working group within International Collaborative Partnership on Forests is required. International congresson forest education is appropriate to exchange ideas and enhance networking. Strengthen regional and subregional cooperation to meet needs for education, especially teachers’ trainings and education networks5. Development of forest education requires research, innovation and learningForest education needs evidence based innovative solutions similar to any other sector. Research on education requires scientific establishment such as international associations and journals. Research is a necessityon curricula needs, pedagogical methods, teaching materials and high-tech teaching and learning innovations. Forest educators need both theoretical pedagogical training and possibilities to familiarize themselves with theforestry practices. 6. Forest education should meet decision makers and provide life-long learning opportunities for professionalsExecutive training for decision makers can provide efficient policy results. Training courses consist of highlevel lectures, excursions, discussions and networking. Establishing MBA type master's degree for thoseprofessionals not having background in forestry is an efficient solution for Life-long learning. 7. Forest education needs public engagement and empowering vulnerable groups. There is a need for new ways of providing forest knowledge to non-expert and people who are vulnerable. Entrepreneurship programmes for elementary education provide useful basics for forestry and other branches ofeconomy. Social learning, informal learning and nano degrees can reach easier than before new groups of learners. There is also a need for new scholarship programmes for students coming from developing countries.8. Ensure responsible, inclusive and transparent forest institutions for democratic decision-making. Governments should enable policy dialogue spaces and forest stakeholders’ participation in decisionmaking processes ensuring inclusion of vulnerable groups including women and youth. Decentralisation provides an opportunity to advance democratic involvement of local communities in sustainable forest management. Governments should secure a level playing field and transparency in land planning processes.9. Address challenges in forest governance and foster timber legalityGovernments should adopt robust legal frameworks and provide for their effective enforcement to curb illegal logging and trade. The EU FLEGT initiative provides a strong blueprint that should be advanced by mobilisingpartnerships for development in the terms of SDG 17. Forest voluntary certification systems, labelling and codes of conduct are valuable measures to enhance sustainable forest management, provided they are combined withconsumer awareness.10. Access to public information improves institutional quality and accountabilityGovernments should implement Open Government Data policies to advance transparency and accountability, create awareness and enhance social innovation. Moreover, governments should develop effective monitoring and accountability mechanisms including policy research and critical data generation as an input for evidence-based policy making, impact evaluation and adjustment. The adoption of institutional performance measurement through a results-based approach and the implementation of key performance indicators will enhance institutional quality.

KW - 4112 Forestry

UR - https://www.un.org/esa/forests/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/UNFF14-BkgdStudy-SDG4-10-16-March2019.pdf

M3 - Commissioned report

BT - Forests, peaceful and inclusive societies, reduced inequality, education, and inclusive institutions at all levels

PB - United Nations

ER -