Genomics approaches to study music perception and performance

Tutkimustuotos: OpinnäyteVäitöskirjaArtikkelikokoelma

Kuvaus

Music perception and performance form a useful tool for studying the normal functioning of the human brain. The abundance of neuroscientific literature has demonstrated that music perception and performance alter the human brain structure and function and induce physiological changes through neurochemical modulation. Emerging evidence from molecular genetic studies have suggested a substantial genetic component in musical aptitude and related traits like creativity in music. This thesis puts a step forward in understanding the molecular genetic background of music perception and performance, using a combination of genomics and bioinformatics approaches. Specifically, the role of copy number variations (CNVs; a form of genetic variation) in musical aptitude and creativity in music was investigated both in the largest families of the MUSGEN-project and also in sporadic cases. The effects of listening to music and performing music by playing an instrument on human transcriptional responses were also investigated. The genome-wide CNV analysis principally identified genes like GALM, PCDHA1-9 as the possible candidate genes that could affect musical aptitude and creativity in music. PCDHA1-9 and GALM genes are known to regulate the serotonergic system, which is responsible for neurocognitive and motor functions, the essential biological processes of music related traits. Overall, the detected genes affect neurodevelopment, learning, memory and serotonergic functions. The findings also demonstrated that large and rare CNV burden does not affect normal traits like musical aptitude. Both listening to music and performing music enhanced the activity of genes that are known to be involved in dopaminergic neurotransmission, neuroplasticity, learning, and memory. Most importantly, one of the most up-regulated genes in both studies - synuclein alpha (SNCA) and its upstream transcription regulator GATA2, are located on chromosomal regions 4q22.1 and 3q21 respectively linking the strongest linkage and associated regions of musical aptitude together. In addition, several of the up-regulated genes in both the studies (like SNCA, FOS, and DUSP1) have been known to be regulated during song learning and singing in songbirds, suggesting a possible evolutionary conservation of genes related to sound perception and production. These novel findings give preliminary information about the genes associated with musical aptitude and the effect of music on the human body. It is obvious that replication studies are required to confirm the results. These pioneering findings could guide further research on the molecular genetics of music perception and performance in humans. These findings will also enhance our understanding of the genetic bases of cognitive traits, the evolution of music and music therapy.
Alkuperäiskielienglanti
JulkaisupaikkaHelsinki
Kustantaja
Painoksen ISBN978-951-51-1386-3
Sähköinen ISBN978-951-51-1387-0
TilaJulkaistu - 2015
OKM-julkaisutyyppiG5 Tohtorinväitöskirja (artikkeli)

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  • 3111 Biolääketieteet

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Kanduri, Chakravarthi. / Genomics approaches to study music perception and performance. Helsinki : University of Helsinki, 2015. 81 Sivumäärä
@phdthesis{1673092fe21c4e43826a6af0965c5ed7,
title = "Genomics approaches to study music perception and performance",
abstract = "Music perception and performance form a useful tool for studying the normal functioning of the human brain. The abundance of neuroscientific literature has demonstrated that music perception and performance alter the human brain structure and function and induce physiological changes through neurochemical modulation. Emerging evidence from molecular genetic studies have suggested a substantial genetic component in musical aptitude and related traits like creativity in music. This thesis puts a step forward in understanding the molecular genetic background of music perception and performance, using a combination of genomics and bioinformatics approaches. Specifically, the role of copy number variations (CNVs; a form of genetic variation) in musical aptitude and creativity in music was investigated both in the largest families of the MUSGEN-project and also in sporadic cases. The effects of listening to music and performing music by playing an instrument on human transcriptional responses were also investigated. The genome-wide CNV analysis principally identified genes like GALM, PCDHA1-9 as the possible candidate genes that could affect musical aptitude and creativity in music. PCDHA1-9 and GALM genes are known to regulate the serotonergic system, which is responsible for neurocognitive and motor functions, the essential biological processes of music related traits. Overall, the detected genes affect neurodevelopment, learning, memory and serotonergic functions. The findings also demonstrated that large and rare CNV burden does not affect normal traits like musical aptitude. Both listening to music and performing music enhanced the activity of genes that are known to be involved in dopaminergic neurotransmission, neuroplasticity, learning, and memory. Most importantly, one of the most up-regulated genes in both studies - synuclein alpha (SNCA) and its upstream transcription regulator GATA2, are located on chromosomal regions 4q22.1 and 3q21 respectively linking the strongest linkage and associated regions of musical aptitude together. In addition, several of the up-regulated genes in both the studies (like SNCA, FOS, and DUSP1) have been known to be regulated during song learning and singing in songbirds, suggesting a possible evolutionary conservation of genes related to sound perception and production. These novel findings give preliminary information about the genes associated with musical aptitude and the effect of music on the human body. It is obvious that replication studies are required to confirm the results. These pioneering findings could guide further research on the molecular genetics of music perception and performance in humans. These findings will also enhance our understanding of the genetic bases of cognitive traits, the evolution of music and music therapy.",
keywords = "Aptitude, Creativity, DNA Copy Number Variations, +genetics, Dopamine, Founder Effect, Gene Expression Profiling, Genetics, Population, Genome, Human, Genome-Wide Association Study, Genomics, Music, Pedigree, Transcriptome, 3111 Biomedicine",
author = "Chakravarthi Kanduri",
note = "M1 - 81 s. + liitteet Helsingin yliopisto Volume: Proceeding volume:",
year = "2015",
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isbn = "978-951-51-1386-3",
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Genomics approaches to study music perception and performance. / Kanduri, Chakravarthi.

Helsinki : University of Helsinki, 2015. 81 s.

Tutkimustuotos: OpinnäyteVäitöskirjaArtikkelikokoelma

TY - THES

T1 - Genomics approaches to study music perception and performance

AU - Kanduri, Chakravarthi

N1 - M1 - 81 s. + liitteet Helsingin yliopisto Volume: Proceeding volume:

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - Music perception and performance form a useful tool for studying the normal functioning of the human brain. The abundance of neuroscientific literature has demonstrated that music perception and performance alter the human brain structure and function and induce physiological changes through neurochemical modulation. Emerging evidence from molecular genetic studies have suggested a substantial genetic component in musical aptitude and related traits like creativity in music. This thesis puts a step forward in understanding the molecular genetic background of music perception and performance, using a combination of genomics and bioinformatics approaches. Specifically, the role of copy number variations (CNVs; a form of genetic variation) in musical aptitude and creativity in music was investigated both in the largest families of the MUSGEN-project and also in sporadic cases. The effects of listening to music and performing music by playing an instrument on human transcriptional responses were also investigated. The genome-wide CNV analysis principally identified genes like GALM, PCDHA1-9 as the possible candidate genes that could affect musical aptitude and creativity in music. PCDHA1-9 and GALM genes are known to regulate the serotonergic system, which is responsible for neurocognitive and motor functions, the essential biological processes of music related traits. Overall, the detected genes affect neurodevelopment, learning, memory and serotonergic functions. The findings also demonstrated that large and rare CNV burden does not affect normal traits like musical aptitude. Both listening to music and performing music enhanced the activity of genes that are known to be involved in dopaminergic neurotransmission, neuroplasticity, learning, and memory. Most importantly, one of the most up-regulated genes in both studies - synuclein alpha (SNCA) and its upstream transcription regulator GATA2, are located on chromosomal regions 4q22.1 and 3q21 respectively linking the strongest linkage and associated regions of musical aptitude together. In addition, several of the up-regulated genes in both the studies (like SNCA, FOS, and DUSP1) have been known to be regulated during song learning and singing in songbirds, suggesting a possible evolutionary conservation of genes related to sound perception and production. These novel findings give preliminary information about the genes associated with musical aptitude and the effect of music on the human body. It is obvious that replication studies are required to confirm the results. These pioneering findings could guide further research on the molecular genetics of music perception and performance in humans. These findings will also enhance our understanding of the genetic bases of cognitive traits, the evolution of music and music therapy.

AB - Music perception and performance form a useful tool for studying the normal functioning of the human brain. The abundance of neuroscientific literature has demonstrated that music perception and performance alter the human brain structure and function and induce physiological changes through neurochemical modulation. Emerging evidence from molecular genetic studies have suggested a substantial genetic component in musical aptitude and related traits like creativity in music. This thesis puts a step forward in understanding the molecular genetic background of music perception and performance, using a combination of genomics and bioinformatics approaches. Specifically, the role of copy number variations (CNVs; a form of genetic variation) in musical aptitude and creativity in music was investigated both in the largest families of the MUSGEN-project and also in sporadic cases. The effects of listening to music and performing music by playing an instrument on human transcriptional responses were also investigated. The genome-wide CNV analysis principally identified genes like GALM, PCDHA1-9 as the possible candidate genes that could affect musical aptitude and creativity in music. PCDHA1-9 and GALM genes are known to regulate the serotonergic system, which is responsible for neurocognitive and motor functions, the essential biological processes of music related traits. Overall, the detected genes affect neurodevelopment, learning, memory and serotonergic functions. The findings also demonstrated that large and rare CNV burden does not affect normal traits like musical aptitude. Both listening to music and performing music enhanced the activity of genes that are known to be involved in dopaminergic neurotransmission, neuroplasticity, learning, and memory. Most importantly, one of the most up-regulated genes in both studies - synuclein alpha (SNCA) and its upstream transcription regulator GATA2, are located on chromosomal regions 4q22.1 and 3q21 respectively linking the strongest linkage and associated regions of musical aptitude together. In addition, several of the up-regulated genes in both the studies (like SNCA, FOS, and DUSP1) have been known to be regulated during song learning and singing in songbirds, suggesting a possible evolutionary conservation of genes related to sound perception and production. These novel findings give preliminary information about the genes associated with musical aptitude and the effect of music on the human body. It is obvious that replication studies are required to confirm the results. These pioneering findings could guide further research on the molecular genetics of music perception and performance in humans. These findings will also enhance our understanding of the genetic bases of cognitive traits, the evolution of music and music therapy.

KW - Aptitude

KW - Creativity

KW - DNA Copy Number Variations

KW - +genetics

KW - Dopamine

KW - Founder Effect

KW - Gene Expression Profiling

KW - Genetics, Population

KW - Genome, Human

KW - Genome-Wide Association Study

KW - Genomics

KW - Music

KW - Pedigree

KW - Transcriptome

KW - 3111 Biomedicine

M3 - Doctoral Thesis

SN - 978-951-51-1386-3

T3 - Dissertationes Scholae Doctoralis Ad Sanitatem Investigandam Universitatis Helsinkiensis

PB - University of Helsinki

CY - Helsinki

ER -

Kanduri C. Genomics approaches to study music perception and performance. Helsinki: University of Helsinki, 2015. 81 s. (Dissertationes Scholae Doctoralis Ad Sanitatem Investigandam Universitatis Helsinkiensis; 60/2015).