How much oxycodone is needed for adequate analgesia after breast cancer surgery: effect of the OPRM1 118A>G polymorphism

Kristiina Cajanus, Mari Kaunisto, Minna Tallgren, Ritva Jokela, Eija Kalso

Tutkimustuotos: ArtikkelijulkaisuArtikkeliTieteellinenvertaisarvioitu

Kuvaus

Most clinically used opioids are mu-opioid receptor agonists. Therefore, genetic variation of the OPRM1 gene that encodes the mu-opioid receptor is of great interest for understanding pain management. A polymorphism 118A>G (rs1799971) within the OPRM1 gene results in a missense mutation and affects the function of the receptor. We studied the association between the 118A>G polymorphism and oxycodone analgesia and pain sensitivity in 1,000 women undergoing breast cancer surgery. Preoperatively, experimental cold and heat pain sensitivities were tested. Postoperative pain was assessed at rest and during motion. Intravenous oxycodone analgesia was titrated first by a research nurse and on the ward using a patient-controlled analgesia device. The primary endpoint was the amount of oxycodone needed for the first state of adequate analgesia. For each patient, the 118A>G polymorphism was genotyped using the Sequenom MassARRAY (Sequenom, San Diego, CA). The association between this variant and the pain phenotypes was tested using linear regression. The 118A>G variant was associated significantly with the amount of oxycodone requested for adequate analgesia (P = .003, β = .016). Collectively, oxycodone consumption was highest in individuals having the GG genotype (.16 mg/kg), lowest for those with the AA genotype (.12 mg/kg), and moderate for those having the AG genotype (.13 mg/kg). Furthermore, the G allele was associated with higher postoperative baseline pain ratings (P = .001, β = .44). No evidence of association with other pain phenotypes examined was observed.
Alkuperäiskielienglanti
LehtiJournal of Pain
Vuosikerta15
Numero12
Sivut1248-1256
Sivumäärä9
ISSN1526-5900
DOI - pysyväislinkit
TilaJulkaistu - joulukuuta 2014
OKM-julkaisutyyppiA1 Alkuperäisartikkeli tieteellisessä aikakauslehdessä, vertaisarvioitu

Tieteenalat

  • 3126 Kirurgia, anestesiologia, tehohoito, radiologia
  • 1184 Genetiikka, kehitysbiologia, fysiologia

Lainaa tätä

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title = "How much oxycodone is needed for adequate analgesia after breast cancer surgery: effect of the OPRM1 118A>G polymorphism",
abstract = "Most clinically used opioids are mu-opioid receptor agonists. Therefore, genetic variation of the OPRM1 gene that encodes the mu-opioid receptor is of great interest for understanding pain management. A polymorphism 118A>G (rs1799971) within the OPRM1 gene results in a missense mutation and affects the function of the receptor. We studied the association between the 118A>G polymorphism and oxycodone analgesia and pain sensitivity in 1,000 women undergoing breast cancer surgery. Preoperatively, experimental cold and heat pain sensitivities were tested. Postoperative pain was assessed at rest and during motion. Intravenous oxycodone analgesia was titrated first by a research nurse and on the ward using a patient-controlled analgesia device. The primary endpoint was the amount of oxycodone needed for the first state of adequate analgesia. For each patient, the 118A>G polymorphism was genotyped using the Sequenom MassARRAY (Sequenom, San Diego, CA). The association between this variant and the pain phenotypes was tested using linear regression. The 118A>G variant was associated significantly with the amount of oxycodone requested for adequate analgesia (P = .003, β = .016). Collectively, oxycodone consumption was highest in individuals having the GG genotype (.16 mg/kg), lowest for those with the AA genotype (.12 mg/kg), and moderate for those having the AG genotype (.13 mg/kg). Furthermore, the G allele was associated with higher postoperative baseline pain ratings (P = .001, β = .44). No evidence of association with other pain phenotypes examined was observed.",
keywords = "3126 Surgery, anesthesiology, intensive care, radiology, 1184 Genetics, developmental biology, physiology",
author = "Kristiina Cajanus and Mari Kaunisto and Minna Tallgren and Ritva Jokela and Eija Kalso",
year = "2014",
month = "12",
doi = "10.1016/j.jpain.2014.09.002",
language = "English",
volume = "15",
pages = "1248--1256",
journal = "Journal of Pain",
issn = "1526-5900",
publisher = "CHURCHILL LIVINGSTONE",
number = "12",

}

How much oxycodone is needed for adequate analgesia after breast cancer surgery: effect of the OPRM1 118A>G polymorphism. / Cajanus, Kristiina; Kaunisto, Mari; Tallgren, Minna; Jokela, Ritva; Kalso, Eija.

julkaisussa: Journal of Pain, Vuosikerta 15, Nro 12, 12.2014, s. 1248-1256.

Tutkimustuotos: ArtikkelijulkaisuArtikkeliTieteellinenvertaisarvioitu

TY - JOUR

T1 - How much oxycodone is needed for adequate analgesia after breast cancer surgery: effect of the OPRM1 118A>G polymorphism

AU - Cajanus, Kristiina

AU - Kaunisto, Mari

AU - Tallgren, Minna

AU - Jokela, Ritva

AU - Kalso, Eija

PY - 2014/12

Y1 - 2014/12

N2 - Most clinically used opioids are mu-opioid receptor agonists. Therefore, genetic variation of the OPRM1 gene that encodes the mu-opioid receptor is of great interest for understanding pain management. A polymorphism 118A>G (rs1799971) within the OPRM1 gene results in a missense mutation and affects the function of the receptor. We studied the association between the 118A>G polymorphism and oxycodone analgesia and pain sensitivity in 1,000 women undergoing breast cancer surgery. Preoperatively, experimental cold and heat pain sensitivities were tested. Postoperative pain was assessed at rest and during motion. Intravenous oxycodone analgesia was titrated first by a research nurse and on the ward using a patient-controlled analgesia device. The primary endpoint was the amount of oxycodone needed for the first state of adequate analgesia. For each patient, the 118A>G polymorphism was genotyped using the Sequenom MassARRAY (Sequenom, San Diego, CA). The association between this variant and the pain phenotypes was tested using linear regression. The 118A>G variant was associated significantly with the amount of oxycodone requested for adequate analgesia (P = .003, β = .016). Collectively, oxycodone consumption was highest in individuals having the GG genotype (.16 mg/kg), lowest for those with the AA genotype (.12 mg/kg), and moderate for those having the AG genotype (.13 mg/kg). Furthermore, the G allele was associated with higher postoperative baseline pain ratings (P = .001, β = .44). No evidence of association with other pain phenotypes examined was observed.

AB - Most clinically used opioids are mu-opioid receptor agonists. Therefore, genetic variation of the OPRM1 gene that encodes the mu-opioid receptor is of great interest for understanding pain management. A polymorphism 118A>G (rs1799971) within the OPRM1 gene results in a missense mutation and affects the function of the receptor. We studied the association between the 118A>G polymorphism and oxycodone analgesia and pain sensitivity in 1,000 women undergoing breast cancer surgery. Preoperatively, experimental cold and heat pain sensitivities were tested. Postoperative pain was assessed at rest and during motion. Intravenous oxycodone analgesia was titrated first by a research nurse and on the ward using a patient-controlled analgesia device. The primary endpoint was the amount of oxycodone needed for the first state of adequate analgesia. For each patient, the 118A>G polymorphism was genotyped using the Sequenom MassARRAY (Sequenom, San Diego, CA). The association between this variant and the pain phenotypes was tested using linear regression. The 118A>G variant was associated significantly with the amount of oxycodone requested for adequate analgesia (P = .003, β = .016). Collectively, oxycodone consumption was highest in individuals having the GG genotype (.16 mg/kg), lowest for those with the AA genotype (.12 mg/kg), and moderate for those having the AG genotype (.13 mg/kg). Furthermore, the G allele was associated with higher postoperative baseline pain ratings (P = .001, β = .44). No evidence of association with other pain phenotypes examined was observed.

KW - 3126 Surgery, anesthesiology, intensive care, radiology

KW - 1184 Genetics, developmental biology, physiology

U2 - 10.1016/j.jpain.2014.09.002

DO - 10.1016/j.jpain.2014.09.002

M3 - Article

VL - 15

SP - 1248

EP - 1256

JO - Journal of Pain

JF - Journal of Pain

SN - 1526-5900

IS - 12

ER -