Kuvaus

Involuntary staying, or a desire to move without the possibility to do so, is an under-studied topic. In this study, we examine involuntary staying among the residents of post-Second World War Finnish housing estates; we study its frequency, association with self-rated health and role in the relationship between neighbourhood disadvantage and self-rated health. Involuntary staying and poor health are expected to be associated through long-term stress related to housing and health-based selection in inconvenient housing outcomes. Furthermore, we address the self-perceived reasons for involuntary staying and the interaction between involuntary staying and household income. Two types of involuntary staying are distinguished, depending on whether a resident wants to move within or away from the current neighbourhood. The survey data (n = 7369) from a stratified cluster sample of the residents of 70 Finnish housing estate neighbourhoods are combined with the corresponding geo-referenced register data on these neighbourhoods’ sociodemographic characteristics. Of the residents, 35% are found to be involuntary stayers, and over half of the involuntary stayers want to move away from their current neighbourhoods. Financial concern is the most common self-perceived reason for involuntary staying. Both types of involuntary staying are associated with low self-rated health after adjusting for potential confounders. Being trapped in the current neighbourhood partially mediates the adjusted association between neighbourhood disadvantage and self-rated health. The association between self-rated health and involuntary staying is not modified by household income. In conclusion, involuntary staying is common in the study population and furthers the understanding about neighbourhood inequalities in health.
Alkuperäiskielienglanti
LehtiUrban Studies
ISSN0042-0980
DOI - pysyväislinkit
TilaJulkaistu - 2019
OKM-julkaisutyyppiA1 Alkuperäisartikkeli tieteellisessä aikakauslehdessä, vertaisarvioitu

Tieteenalat

  • 5141 Sosiologia
  • 519 Yhteiskuntamaantiede, talousmaantiede

Lainaa tätä

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title = "Involuntary staying and self-rated health: A multilevel study on housing, health and neighbourhood effects",
abstract = "Involuntary staying, or a desire to move without the possibility to do so, is an under-studied topic. In this study, we examine involuntary staying among the residents of post-Second World War Finnish housing estates; we study its frequency, association with self-rated health and role in the relationship between neighbourhood disadvantage and self-rated health. Involuntary staying and poor health are expected to be associated through long-term stress related to housing and health-based selection in inconvenient housing outcomes. Furthermore, we address the self-perceived reasons for involuntary staying and the interaction between involuntary staying and household income. Two types of involuntary staying are distinguished, depending on whether a resident wants to move within or away from the current neighbourhood. The survey data (n = 7369) from a stratified cluster sample of the residents of 70 Finnish housing estate neighbourhoods are combined with the corresponding geo-referenced register data on these neighbourhoods’ sociodemographic characteristics. Of the residents, 35{\%} are found to be involuntary stayers, and over half of the involuntary stayers want to move away from their current neighbourhoods. Financial concern is the most common self-perceived reason for involuntary staying. Both types of involuntary staying are associated with low self-rated health after adjusting for potential confounders. Being trapped in the current neighbourhood partially mediates the adjusted association between neighbourhood disadvantage and self-rated health. The association between self-rated health and involuntary staying is not modified by household income. In conclusion, involuntary staying is common in the study population and furthers the understanding about neighbourhood inequalities in health.",
keywords = "5141 Sociology, 519 Social and economic geography",
author = "Kemppainen, {Teemu Tapio} and Elovainio, {Marko Juhani} and Kortteinen, {Matti Mikael} and Vaattovaara, {Mari Kaarina}",
year = "2019",
doi = "10.1177{\%}2F0042098019827521",
language = "English",
journal = "Urban Studies",
issn = "0042-0980",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Ltd",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Involuntary staying and self-rated health

T2 - A multilevel study on housing, health and neighbourhood effects

AU - Kemppainen, Teemu Tapio

AU - Elovainio, Marko Juhani

AU - Kortteinen, Matti Mikael

AU - Vaattovaara, Mari Kaarina

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - Involuntary staying, or a desire to move without the possibility to do so, is an under-studied topic. In this study, we examine involuntary staying among the residents of post-Second World War Finnish housing estates; we study its frequency, association with self-rated health and role in the relationship between neighbourhood disadvantage and self-rated health. Involuntary staying and poor health are expected to be associated through long-term stress related to housing and health-based selection in inconvenient housing outcomes. Furthermore, we address the self-perceived reasons for involuntary staying and the interaction between involuntary staying and household income. Two types of involuntary staying are distinguished, depending on whether a resident wants to move within or away from the current neighbourhood. The survey data (n = 7369) from a stratified cluster sample of the residents of 70 Finnish housing estate neighbourhoods are combined with the corresponding geo-referenced register data on these neighbourhoods’ sociodemographic characteristics. Of the residents, 35% are found to be involuntary stayers, and over half of the involuntary stayers want to move away from their current neighbourhoods. Financial concern is the most common self-perceived reason for involuntary staying. Both types of involuntary staying are associated with low self-rated health after adjusting for potential confounders. Being trapped in the current neighbourhood partially mediates the adjusted association between neighbourhood disadvantage and self-rated health. The association between self-rated health and involuntary staying is not modified by household income. In conclusion, involuntary staying is common in the study population and furthers the understanding about neighbourhood inequalities in health.

AB - Involuntary staying, or a desire to move without the possibility to do so, is an under-studied topic. In this study, we examine involuntary staying among the residents of post-Second World War Finnish housing estates; we study its frequency, association with self-rated health and role in the relationship between neighbourhood disadvantage and self-rated health. Involuntary staying and poor health are expected to be associated through long-term stress related to housing and health-based selection in inconvenient housing outcomes. Furthermore, we address the self-perceived reasons for involuntary staying and the interaction between involuntary staying and household income. Two types of involuntary staying are distinguished, depending on whether a resident wants to move within or away from the current neighbourhood. The survey data (n = 7369) from a stratified cluster sample of the residents of 70 Finnish housing estate neighbourhoods are combined with the corresponding geo-referenced register data on these neighbourhoods’ sociodemographic characteristics. Of the residents, 35% are found to be involuntary stayers, and over half of the involuntary stayers want to move away from their current neighbourhoods. Financial concern is the most common self-perceived reason for involuntary staying. Both types of involuntary staying are associated with low self-rated health after adjusting for potential confounders. Being trapped in the current neighbourhood partially mediates the adjusted association between neighbourhood disadvantage and self-rated health. The association between self-rated health and involuntary staying is not modified by household income. In conclusion, involuntary staying is common in the study population and furthers the understanding about neighbourhood inequalities in health.

KW - 5141 Sociology

KW - 519 Social and economic geography

U2 - 10.1177%2F0042098019827521

DO - 10.1177%2F0042098019827521

M3 - Article

JO - Urban Studies

JF - Urban Studies

SN - 0042-0980

ER -