Journeys in Aidland: An Autobiographic Exploration of Resistance to Development Aid

Tutkimustuotos: ArtikkelijulkaisuArtikkeliTieteellinenvertaisarvioitu

Kuvaus

The article is inspired by autobiographical and auto-ethnographic approaches
to studying international relations, development and humanitarian aid.1 It consists of a collage of the authors’ personal experiences in two post-disaster contexts, respectively in Aceh, Indonesia and Haiti, and presents a dialogue between two autobiographical stories that reveal the shared experiences and emotional labour of the humanitarian aid practice. Addressing questions such as “What does it mean to feel like an outsider?”; “Outsider to what?”; “Is being an outsider a failure or a strategy of resistance?” This article circulates around the themes of mobility, temporality, intersections of class, gender and
‘whiteness’, and how they are embedded within the materiality and spatiality of
humanitarian aid. Feelings of separation and discomfort point towards an opening for critical discussion on the ways in which these practices are both maintained and resisted. Although considered as an important vehicle for the care of the self, the authors struggle to offer any easy solutions, recognising their privilege of confession, and the risk of becoming trapped in the familiar circulation of truths of the Global North.
Alkuperäiskielienglanti
LehtiJournal of Narrative Politics
Vuosikerta1
Numero1, September
Sivut76-96
TilaJulkaistu - 2014
OKM-julkaisutyyppiA1 Alkuperäisartikkeli tieteellisessä aikakauslehdessä, vertaisarvioitu

Tieteenalat

  • 6122 Kirjallisuuden tutkimus
  • 517 Valtio-oppi, hallintotiede
  • 519 Yhteiskuntamaantiede, talousmaantiede

Lainaa tätä

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Journeys in Aidland : An Autobiographic Exploration of Resistance to Development Aid. / Martini, Ermina; Jauhola, Marjaana.

julkaisussa: Journal of Narrative Politics, Vuosikerta 1, Nro 1, September, 2014, s. 76-96.

Tutkimustuotos: ArtikkelijulkaisuArtikkeliTieteellinenvertaisarvioitu

TY - JOUR

T1 - Journeys in Aidland

T2 - An Autobiographic Exploration of Resistance to Development Aid

AU - Martini, Ermina

AU - Jauhola, Marjaana

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - The article is inspired by autobiographical and auto-ethnographic approachesto studying international relations, development and humanitarian aid.1 It consists of a collage of the authors’ personal experiences in two post-disaster contexts, respectively in Aceh, Indonesia and Haiti, and presents a dialogue between two autobiographical stories that reveal the shared experiences and emotional labour of the humanitarian aid practice. Addressing questions such as “What does it mean to feel like an outsider?”; “Outsider to what?”; “Is being an outsider a failure or a strategy of resistance?” This article circulates around the themes of mobility, temporality, intersections of class, gender and‘whiteness’, and how they are embedded within the materiality and spatiality ofhumanitarian aid. Feelings of separation and discomfort point towards an opening for critical discussion on the ways in which these practices are both maintained and resisted. Although considered as an important vehicle for the care of the self, the authors struggle to offer any easy solutions, recognising their privilege of confession, and the risk of becoming trapped in the familiar circulation of truths of the Global North.

AB - The article is inspired by autobiographical and auto-ethnographic approachesto studying international relations, development and humanitarian aid.1 It consists of a collage of the authors’ personal experiences in two post-disaster contexts, respectively in Aceh, Indonesia and Haiti, and presents a dialogue between two autobiographical stories that reveal the shared experiences and emotional labour of the humanitarian aid practice. Addressing questions such as “What does it mean to feel like an outsider?”; “Outsider to what?”; “Is being an outsider a failure or a strategy of resistance?” This article circulates around the themes of mobility, temporality, intersections of class, gender and‘whiteness’, and how they are embedded within the materiality and spatiality ofhumanitarian aid. Feelings of separation and discomfort point towards an opening for critical discussion on the ways in which these practices are both maintained and resisted. Although considered as an important vehicle for the care of the self, the authors struggle to offer any easy solutions, recognising their privilege of confession, and the risk of becoming trapped in the familiar circulation of truths of the Global North.

KW - 6122 Literature studies

KW - 517 Political science

KW - 519 Social and economic geography

M3 - Article

VL - 1

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JO - Journal of Narrative Politics

JF - Journal of Narrative Politics

SN - 2368-2507

IS - 1, September

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