National and local medication error reporting systems – A survey of practices in 16 countries

Anna-Riia Holmström, Marja Airaksinen, Marjorie Weiss, Tana Wuliji, Xuan Hao Chan, Raisa Laaksonen

Tutkimustuotos: ArtikkelijulkaisuArtikkeliTieteellinenvertaisarvioitu

Kuvaus

OBJECTIVES: To explore the existence and characteristics of national and local medication error reporting (MER) systems, and to describe national medication safety experts’ perceptions of a good and effective MER system and barriers to reporting.
METHODS: In a descriptive cross-sectional study, 32 medication safety experts were identified through member organizations of the International Pharmaceutical Federation in 88 countries and other professional organizations in 3 additional countries. These experts were invited to participate in an on-line survey.
RESULTS: 16 national medication safety experts from different countries participated in the study (response rate 50%). A national (n=5) or local (n=6) MER system existed in 11 of these countries. In 5 countries no MER system existed. The most common feature of the MER systems was confidentiality of the reported information. Most experts perceived that a good and effective MER system was characterized by the opportunity to learn from errors by those involved in reporting, having a non-punitive approach to reporting, and ease of use. They also perceived that a blame culture, lack of time, training and coordination of reporting were the main barriers to reporting.
CONCLUSIONS: Blame culture, a lack of time, training and coordination of reporting continue to be the major barriers to reporting. Learning from errors and having a non-punitive approach to reporting were thought to be the most critical features of a MER system. Difficulties in identifying national medication safety experts indicates a need for promoting international networking of medication safety experts and bodies for sharing information and learning from others.
Alkuperäiskielienglanti
LehtiJournal of Patient Safety
Vuosikerta8
Numero4
Sivut165-176
Sivumäärä12
ISSN1549-8417
DOI - pysyväislinkit
TilaJulkaistu - 2012
OKM-julkaisutyyppiA1 Alkuperäisartikkeli tieteellisessä aikakauslehdessä, vertaisarvioitu

Tieteenalat

  • 317 Farmasia

Lainaa tätä

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title = "National and local medication error reporting systems – A survey of practices in 16 countries",
abstract = "OBJECTIVES: To explore the existence and characteristics of national and local medication error reporting (MER) systems, and to describe national medication safety experts’ perceptions of a good and effective MER system and barriers to reporting. METHODS: In a descriptive cross-sectional study, 32 medication safety experts were identified through member organizations of the International Pharmaceutical Federation in 88 countries and other professional organizations in 3 additional countries. These experts were invited to participate in an on-line survey. RESULTS: 16 national medication safety experts from different countries participated in the study (response rate 50{\%}). A national (n=5) or local (n=6) MER system existed in 11 of these countries. In 5 countries no MER system existed. The most common feature of the MER systems was confidentiality of the reported information. Most experts perceived that a good and effective MER system was characterized by the opportunity to learn from errors by those involved in reporting, having a non-punitive approach to reporting, and ease of use. They also perceived that a blame culture, lack of time, training and coordination of reporting were the main barriers to reporting. CONCLUSIONS: Blame culture, a lack of time, training and coordination of reporting continue to be the major barriers to reporting. Learning from errors and having a non-punitive approach to reporting were thought to be the most critical features of a MER system. Difficulties in identifying national medication safety experts indicates a need for promoting international networking of medication safety experts and bodies for sharing information and learning from others.",
keywords = "317 Pharmacy, medication error, medication safety, medication error reporting, medication error reporting systems",
author = "Anna-Riia Holmstr{\"o}m and Marja Airaksinen and Marjorie Weiss and Tana Wuliji and Chan, {Xuan Hao} and Raisa Laaksonen",
year = "2012",
doi = "10.1097/PTS.0b013e3182676cf3",
language = "English",
volume = "8",
pages = "165--176",
journal = "Journal of Patient Safety",
issn = "1549-8417",
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National and local medication error reporting systems – A survey of practices in 16 countries. / Holmström, Anna-Riia; Airaksinen, Marja; Weiss, Marjorie; Wuliji, Tana; Chan, Xuan Hao; Laaksonen, Raisa.

julkaisussa: Journal of Patient Safety, Vuosikerta 8, Nro 4, 2012, s. 165-176.

Tutkimustuotos: ArtikkelijulkaisuArtikkeliTieteellinenvertaisarvioitu

TY - JOUR

T1 - National and local medication error reporting systems – A survey of practices in 16 countries

AU - Holmström, Anna-Riia

AU - Airaksinen, Marja

AU - Weiss, Marjorie

AU - Wuliji, Tana

AU - Chan, Xuan Hao

AU - Laaksonen, Raisa

PY - 2012

Y1 - 2012

N2 - OBJECTIVES: To explore the existence and characteristics of national and local medication error reporting (MER) systems, and to describe national medication safety experts’ perceptions of a good and effective MER system and barriers to reporting. METHODS: In a descriptive cross-sectional study, 32 medication safety experts were identified through member organizations of the International Pharmaceutical Federation in 88 countries and other professional organizations in 3 additional countries. These experts were invited to participate in an on-line survey. RESULTS: 16 national medication safety experts from different countries participated in the study (response rate 50%). A national (n=5) or local (n=6) MER system existed in 11 of these countries. In 5 countries no MER system existed. The most common feature of the MER systems was confidentiality of the reported information. Most experts perceived that a good and effective MER system was characterized by the opportunity to learn from errors by those involved in reporting, having a non-punitive approach to reporting, and ease of use. They also perceived that a blame culture, lack of time, training and coordination of reporting were the main barriers to reporting. CONCLUSIONS: Blame culture, a lack of time, training and coordination of reporting continue to be the major barriers to reporting. Learning from errors and having a non-punitive approach to reporting were thought to be the most critical features of a MER system. Difficulties in identifying national medication safety experts indicates a need for promoting international networking of medication safety experts and bodies for sharing information and learning from others.

AB - OBJECTIVES: To explore the existence and characteristics of national and local medication error reporting (MER) systems, and to describe national medication safety experts’ perceptions of a good and effective MER system and barriers to reporting. METHODS: In a descriptive cross-sectional study, 32 medication safety experts were identified through member organizations of the International Pharmaceutical Federation in 88 countries and other professional organizations in 3 additional countries. These experts were invited to participate in an on-line survey. RESULTS: 16 national medication safety experts from different countries participated in the study (response rate 50%). A national (n=5) or local (n=6) MER system existed in 11 of these countries. In 5 countries no MER system existed. The most common feature of the MER systems was confidentiality of the reported information. Most experts perceived that a good and effective MER system was characterized by the opportunity to learn from errors by those involved in reporting, having a non-punitive approach to reporting, and ease of use. They also perceived that a blame culture, lack of time, training and coordination of reporting were the main barriers to reporting. CONCLUSIONS: Blame culture, a lack of time, training and coordination of reporting continue to be the major barriers to reporting. Learning from errors and having a non-punitive approach to reporting were thought to be the most critical features of a MER system. Difficulties in identifying national medication safety experts indicates a need for promoting international networking of medication safety experts and bodies for sharing information and learning from others.

KW - 317 Pharmacy

KW - medication error

KW - medication safety

KW - medication error reporting

KW - medication error reporting systems

U2 - 10.1097/PTS.0b013e3182676cf3

DO - 10.1097/PTS.0b013e3182676cf3

M3 - Article

VL - 8

SP - 165

EP - 176

JO - Journal of Patient Safety

JF - Journal of Patient Safety

SN - 1549-8417

IS - 4

ER -