New signals and insights from dense seismic arrays in fault zone environments

Tutkimustuotos: KonferenssimateriaalitKonferenssiabstraktiTutkimus

Kuvaus

Recordings of head waves by single or few sensors in faulting environments have long been used to study material contrasts across fault zones. Line arrays consisting of few to a dozen stations have found similarly wide application for the analysis of fault zone trapped waves and arrival patterns of local earthquake phases. Such observations can help to constrain major structural units of the fault zone architecture, which is important for the assessment of faulting patterns and ground motion scenarios. In contrast to these established approaches, modern dense arrays can consist of hundreds to thousand sensors. This allows the spatio-temporally unaliased sampling of the wavefield. Application of the cross-correlation technique to records collected by such networks at different scales recovers new seismic signatures such as fault zone trapped noise and fault zone reverberations that can provide complementary information on fault zone structure and its interaction with seismic wavefields.
In this presentation I discuss imaging results using examples from various fault zone arrays and networks with station numbers ranging over three orders of magnitude. I present high-resolution images of the fault zone velocity structure based on surface wave dispersion analysis and distributions of seismic attenuation and anisotropy using a surface wave near-field imaging method. Snapshots of synthetic wavefields highlight the significance of phases reflected at horizontal interfaces. These phases are important for estimating the depth extent or more generally the layered structure of the mechanically weak damage zones. I will conclude the imaging part with the complex wavefields that emerge in the coda of correlations between fault zone arrays and regional stations, their potential contribution to fault zone imaging, and the associated methodological challenges for obtaining better insights into fault zone structure and mechanics.
The monitoring of the fault zone response to different deformations characterized by variable amplitude, duration, or periodicity poses a key observational task. New high resolution results will have important implications for our understanding of fault zone dynamics and seismic hazard analysis. This endeavor benefits similarly from the densification of seismic arrays. I highlight the potential of this approach and anticipate future developments of integrated fault zone monitoring showing recent examples of transient fault zone responses to a local moderate and a distant large earthquake.
Alkuperäiskielienglanti
TilaJulkaistu - 27 marraskuuta 2017
TapahtumaFrontiers in Studies of Earthquakes and Faults - SUSTech, Shenzhen, Kiina
Kesto: 27 marraskuuta 20171 joulukuuta 2017

Työpaja

TyöpajaFrontiers in Studies of Earthquakes and Faults
MaaKiina
KaupunkiShenzhen
Ajanjakso27/11/201701/12/2017

Tieteenalat

  • 1171 Geotieteet

Lainaa tätä

Hillers, G. (2017). New signals and insights from dense seismic arrays in fault zone environments. Abstraktin lähde: Frontiers in Studies of Earthquakes and Faults, Shenzhen, Kiina.
Hillers, Gregor. / New signals and insights from dense seismic arrays in fault zone environments. Abstraktin lähde: Frontiers in Studies of Earthquakes and Faults, Shenzhen, Kiina.
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title = "New signals and insights from dense seismic arrays in fault zone environments",
abstract = "Recordings of head waves by single or few sensors in faulting environments have long been used to study material contrasts across fault zones. Line arrays consisting of few to a dozen stations have found similarly wide application for the analysis of fault zone trapped waves and arrival patterns of local earthquake phases. Such observations can help to constrain major structural units of the fault zone architecture, which is important for the assessment of faulting patterns and ground motion scenarios. In contrast to these established approaches, modern dense arrays can consist of hundreds to thousand sensors. This allows the spatio-temporally unaliased sampling of the wavefield. Application of the cross-correlation technique to records collected by such networks at different scales recovers new seismic signatures such as fault zone trapped noise and fault zone reverberations that can provide complementary information on fault zone structure and its interaction with seismic wavefields.In this presentation I discuss imaging results using examples from various fault zone arrays and networks with station numbers ranging over three orders of magnitude. I present high-resolution images of the fault zone velocity structure based on surface wave dispersion analysis and distributions of seismic attenuation and anisotropy using a surface wave near-field imaging method. Snapshots of synthetic wavefields highlight the significance of phases reflected at horizontal interfaces. These phases are important for estimating the depth extent or more generally the layered structure of the mechanically weak damage zones. I will conclude the imaging part with the complex wavefields that emerge in the coda of correlations between fault zone arrays and regional stations, their potential contribution to fault zone imaging, and the associated methodological challenges for obtaining better insights into fault zone structure and mechanics.The monitoring of the fault zone response to different deformations characterized by variable amplitude, duration, or periodicity poses a key observational task. New high resolution results will have important implications for our understanding of fault zone dynamics and seismic hazard analysis. This endeavor benefits similarly from the densification of seismic arrays. I highlight the potential of this approach and anticipate future developments of integrated fault zone monitoring showing recent examples of transient fault zone responses to a local moderate and a distant large earthquake.",
keywords = "1171 Geosciences",
author = "Gregor Hillers",
year = "2017",
month = "11",
day = "27",
language = "English",
note = "Frontiers in Studies of Earthquakes and Faults ; Conference date: 27-11-2017 Through 01-12-2017",

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Hillers, G 2017, 'New signals and insights from dense seismic arrays in fault zone environments' Frontiers in Studies of Earthquakes and Faults, Shenzhen, Kiina, 27/11/2017 - 01/12/2017, .

New signals and insights from dense seismic arrays in fault zone environments. / Hillers, Gregor.

2017. Abstraktin lähde: Frontiers in Studies of Earthquakes and Faults, Shenzhen, Kiina.

Tutkimustuotos: KonferenssimateriaalitKonferenssiabstraktiTutkimus

TY - CONF

T1 - New signals and insights from dense seismic arrays in fault zone environments

AU - Hillers, Gregor

PY - 2017/11/27

Y1 - 2017/11/27

N2 - Recordings of head waves by single or few sensors in faulting environments have long been used to study material contrasts across fault zones. Line arrays consisting of few to a dozen stations have found similarly wide application for the analysis of fault zone trapped waves and arrival patterns of local earthquake phases. Such observations can help to constrain major structural units of the fault zone architecture, which is important for the assessment of faulting patterns and ground motion scenarios. In contrast to these established approaches, modern dense arrays can consist of hundreds to thousand sensors. This allows the spatio-temporally unaliased sampling of the wavefield. Application of the cross-correlation technique to records collected by such networks at different scales recovers new seismic signatures such as fault zone trapped noise and fault zone reverberations that can provide complementary information on fault zone structure and its interaction with seismic wavefields.In this presentation I discuss imaging results using examples from various fault zone arrays and networks with station numbers ranging over three orders of magnitude. I present high-resolution images of the fault zone velocity structure based on surface wave dispersion analysis and distributions of seismic attenuation and anisotropy using a surface wave near-field imaging method. Snapshots of synthetic wavefields highlight the significance of phases reflected at horizontal interfaces. These phases are important for estimating the depth extent or more generally the layered structure of the mechanically weak damage zones. I will conclude the imaging part with the complex wavefields that emerge in the coda of correlations between fault zone arrays and regional stations, their potential contribution to fault zone imaging, and the associated methodological challenges for obtaining better insights into fault zone structure and mechanics.The monitoring of the fault zone response to different deformations characterized by variable amplitude, duration, or periodicity poses a key observational task. New high resolution results will have important implications for our understanding of fault zone dynamics and seismic hazard analysis. This endeavor benefits similarly from the densification of seismic arrays. I highlight the potential of this approach and anticipate future developments of integrated fault zone monitoring showing recent examples of transient fault zone responses to a local moderate and a distant large earthquake.

AB - Recordings of head waves by single or few sensors in faulting environments have long been used to study material contrasts across fault zones. Line arrays consisting of few to a dozen stations have found similarly wide application for the analysis of fault zone trapped waves and arrival patterns of local earthquake phases. Such observations can help to constrain major structural units of the fault zone architecture, which is important for the assessment of faulting patterns and ground motion scenarios. In contrast to these established approaches, modern dense arrays can consist of hundreds to thousand sensors. This allows the spatio-temporally unaliased sampling of the wavefield. Application of the cross-correlation technique to records collected by such networks at different scales recovers new seismic signatures such as fault zone trapped noise and fault zone reverberations that can provide complementary information on fault zone structure and its interaction with seismic wavefields.In this presentation I discuss imaging results using examples from various fault zone arrays and networks with station numbers ranging over three orders of magnitude. I present high-resolution images of the fault zone velocity structure based on surface wave dispersion analysis and distributions of seismic attenuation and anisotropy using a surface wave near-field imaging method. Snapshots of synthetic wavefields highlight the significance of phases reflected at horizontal interfaces. These phases are important for estimating the depth extent or more generally the layered structure of the mechanically weak damage zones. I will conclude the imaging part with the complex wavefields that emerge in the coda of correlations between fault zone arrays and regional stations, their potential contribution to fault zone imaging, and the associated methodological challenges for obtaining better insights into fault zone structure and mechanics.The monitoring of the fault zone response to different deformations characterized by variable amplitude, duration, or periodicity poses a key observational task. New high resolution results will have important implications for our understanding of fault zone dynamics and seismic hazard analysis. This endeavor benefits similarly from the densification of seismic arrays. I highlight the potential of this approach and anticipate future developments of integrated fault zone monitoring showing recent examples of transient fault zone responses to a local moderate and a distant large earthquake.

KW - 1171 Geosciences

M3 - Abstract

ER -

Hillers G. New signals and insights from dense seismic arrays in fault zone environments. 2017. Abstraktin lähde: Frontiers in Studies of Earthquakes and Faults, Shenzhen, Kiina.