New tools for arctic research: DNA Barcoding the entire communities of plants and animals in Zackenberg, NE-Greenland

Helena Kristiina Wirta, G Varkonyi, Claus Rasmussen, Riikka Maria Kaartinen, Niels Schmidt, Paul D. N. Hebert, M Barták, G. Blagoev, H. Disney, S. Ertl, Peter Gjelstrup, D. J. Gwiazdowicz, Larry Valter Hulden, Jari Ilmonen, Jevgeni Jakovlev, Mathias Jaschhof, Jere Kahanpää, Tuomas Tapio Kankaanpää, Paul Henning Krogh, Renee Labbee & 12 muut C. Lettner, V. Michelsen, Søren Nielsen, T NIELSEN, Lauri Paasivirta, Stephanie Pedersen, Jaakko Pohjoismäki, Jukka Salmela, Pekka Antero Vilkamaa, Henry Uolevi Väre, Michael von Tschirnhaus, Tomas Valter Roslin

Tutkimustuotos: ArtikkelijulkaisuArtikkeliTieteellinen

Kuvaus

DNA sequences offer powerful tools for addressing questions of community ecology:
not only do they allow us to identify and describe the community members, but also
to reveal the biotic interactions between them. Here, we present a recent study (Wirta
et al. 2016) offering a comprehensive library of DNA barcodes for a terrestrial site, the
Zackenberg region in Northeast Greenland. This library includes almost all macroscopic
animals and vascular plants known from the region. A total of 403 terrestrial
animal and 160 vascular plant species were recorded by morphology-based techniques.
DNA barcodes were created with high sequencing success using standard gene regions
(CO1 for animals; rbcLa and ITS2 for plants). 92% of the animal taxa were assigned
to unique Barcode Index Numbers (BINs) and 93% to monophyletic clusters. For
the flora, the discriminatory power was lower, with 54% of the plant species forming
monophyletic clusters based on information combined from barcode regions rbcLa
and ITS2. In evidence of the utility of the library created, we applied it to community
samples of arthropods from Malaise traps, thus resolving compositional turnover in
space and time. Nearly 20 000 arthropod individuals were identified from Malaise trap
catches, revealing 122 BINs not detected by previous sampling and DNA barcoding.
The insect community proved to be dominated by a few highly abundant taxa, with Diptera being the most abundant order, and Chironomidae the most abundant family.
Thus, the DNA barcode library established for the Zackenberg region now offers
scope for ecological explorations, for the detailed dissection of interspecific interactions
throughout the community, and for long-term monitoring. Importantly, the development,
application and curation of the library rely heavily on constant collaboration and
feedback between ecologists and taxonomists.
Alkuperäiskielienglanti
LehtiActa ZooBot Austria
Numero154
Sivut222
Sivumäärä1
ISSN2409-367X
TilaJulkaistu - 2017
OKM-julkaisutyyppiB1 Kirjoitus tieteellisessä aikakauslehdessä

Tieteenalat

  • 1181 Ekologia, evoluutiobiologia

Lainaa tätä

Wirta, Helena Kristiina ; Varkonyi, G ; Rasmussen, Claus ; Kaartinen, Riikka Maria ; Schmidt, Niels ; Hebert, Paul D. N. ; Barták, M ; Blagoev, G. ; Disney, H. ; Ertl, S. ; Gjelstrup, Peter ; Gwiazdowicz, D. J. ; Hulden, Larry Valter ; Ilmonen, Jari ; Jakovlev, Jevgeni ; Jaschhof, Mathias ; Kahanpää, Jere ; Kankaanpää, Tuomas Tapio ; Krogh, Paul Henning ; Labbee, Renee ; Lettner, C. ; Michelsen, V. ; Nielsen, Søren ; NIELSEN, T ; Paasivirta, Lauri ; Pedersen, Stephanie ; Pohjoismäki, Jaakko ; Salmela, Jukka ; Vilkamaa, Pekka Antero ; Väre, Henry Uolevi ; von Tschirnhaus, Michael ; Roslin, Tomas Valter. / New tools for arctic research: DNA Barcoding the entire communities of plants and animals in Zackenberg, NE-Greenland. Julkaisussa: Acta ZooBot Austria. 2017 ; Nro 154. Sivut 222.
@article{fdb36dd1c0384a08965a431e6f421db9,
title = "New tools for arctic research: DNA Barcoding the entire communities of plants and animals in Zackenberg, NE-Greenland",
abstract = "DNA sequences offer powerful tools for addressing questions of community ecology:not only do they allow us to identify and describe the community members, but alsoto reveal the biotic interactions between them. Here, we present a recent study (Wirtaet al. 2016) offering a comprehensive library of DNA barcodes for a terrestrial site, theZackenberg region in Northeast Greenland. This library includes almost all macroscopicanimals and vascular plants known from the region. A total of 403 terrestrialanimal and 160 vascular plant species were recorded by morphology-based techniques.DNA barcodes were created with high sequencing success using standard gene regions(CO1 for animals; rbcLa and ITS2 for plants). 92{\%} of the animal taxa were assignedto unique Barcode Index Numbers (BINs) and 93{\%} to monophyletic clusters. Forthe flora, the discriminatory power was lower, with 54{\%} of the plant species formingmonophyletic clusters based on information combined from barcode regions rbcLaand ITS2. In evidence of the utility of the library created, we applied it to communitysamples of arthropods from Malaise traps, thus resolving compositional turnover inspace and time. Nearly 20 000 arthropod individuals were identified from Malaise trapcatches, revealing 122 BINs not detected by previous sampling and DNA barcoding.The insect community proved to be dominated by a few highly abundant taxa, with Diptera being the most abundant order, and Chironomidae the most abundant family.Thus, the DNA barcode library established for the Zackenberg region now offersscope for ecological explorations, for the detailed dissection of interspecific interactionsthroughout the community, and for long-term monitoring. Importantly, the development,application and curation of the library rely heavily on constant collaboration andfeedback between ecologists and taxonomists.",
keywords = "1181 Ecology, evolutionary biology",
author = "Wirta, {Helena Kristiina} and G Varkonyi and Claus Rasmussen and Kaartinen, {Riikka Maria} and Niels Schmidt and Hebert, {Paul D. N.} and M Bart{\'a}k and G. Blagoev and H. Disney and S. Ertl and Peter Gjelstrup and Gwiazdowicz, {D. J.} and Hulden, {Larry Valter} and Jari Ilmonen and Jevgeni Jakovlev and Mathias Jaschhof and Jere Kahanp{\"a}{\"a} and Kankaanp{\"a}{\"a}, {Tuomas Tapio} and Krogh, {Paul Henning} and Renee Labbee and C. Lettner and V. Michelsen and S{\o}ren Nielsen and T NIELSEN and Lauri Paasivirta and Stephanie Pedersen and Jaakko Pohjoism{\"a}ki and Jukka Salmela and Vilkamaa, {Pekka Antero} and V{\"a}re, {Henry Uolevi} and {von Tschirnhaus}, Michael and Roslin, {Tomas Valter}",
year = "2017",
language = "English",
pages = "222",
journal = "Acta ZooBot Austria",
issn = "2409-367X",
number = "154",

}

Wirta, HK, Varkonyi, G, Rasmussen, C, Kaartinen, RM, Schmidt, N, Hebert, PDN, Barták, M, Blagoev, G, Disney, H, Ertl, S, Gjelstrup, P, Gwiazdowicz, DJ, Hulden, LV, Ilmonen, J, Jakovlev, J, Jaschhof, M, Kahanpää, J, Kankaanpää, TT, Krogh, PH, Labbee, R, Lettner, C, Michelsen, V, Nielsen, S, NIELSEN, T, Paasivirta, L, Pedersen, S, Pohjoismäki, J, Salmela, J, Vilkamaa, PA, Väre, HU, von Tschirnhaus, M & Roslin, TV 2017, 'New tools for arctic research: DNA Barcoding the entire communities of plants and animals in Zackenberg, NE-Greenland', Acta ZooBot Austria, Nro 154, Sivut 222.

New tools for arctic research: DNA Barcoding the entire communities of plants and animals in Zackenberg, NE-Greenland. / Wirta, Helena Kristiina; Varkonyi, G; Rasmussen, Claus; Kaartinen, Riikka Maria; Schmidt, Niels; Hebert, Paul D. N.; Barták, M; Blagoev, G.; Disney, H.; Ertl, S.; Gjelstrup, Peter; Gwiazdowicz, D. J.; Hulden, Larry Valter; Ilmonen, Jari; Jakovlev, Jevgeni; Jaschhof, Mathias; Kahanpää, Jere; Kankaanpää, Tuomas Tapio; Krogh, Paul Henning; Labbee, Renee; Lettner, C.; Michelsen, V.; Nielsen, Søren; NIELSEN, T; Paasivirta, Lauri; Pedersen, Stephanie; Pohjoismäki, Jaakko; Salmela, Jukka; Vilkamaa, Pekka Antero; Väre, Henry Uolevi; von Tschirnhaus, Michael; Roslin, Tomas Valter.

julkaisussa: Acta ZooBot Austria, Nro 154, 2017, s. 222.

Tutkimustuotos: ArtikkelijulkaisuArtikkeliTieteellinen

TY - JOUR

T1 - New tools for arctic research: DNA Barcoding the entire communities of plants and animals in Zackenberg, NE-Greenland

AU - Wirta, Helena Kristiina

AU - Varkonyi, G

AU - Rasmussen, Claus

AU - Kaartinen, Riikka Maria

AU - Schmidt, Niels

AU - Hebert, Paul D. N.

AU - Barták, M

AU - Blagoev, G.

AU - Disney, H.

AU - Ertl, S.

AU - Gjelstrup, Peter

AU - Gwiazdowicz, D. J.

AU - Hulden, Larry Valter

AU - Ilmonen, Jari

AU - Jakovlev, Jevgeni

AU - Jaschhof, Mathias

AU - Kahanpää, Jere

AU - Kankaanpää, Tuomas Tapio

AU - Krogh, Paul Henning

AU - Labbee, Renee

AU - Lettner, C.

AU - Michelsen, V.

AU - Nielsen, Søren

AU - NIELSEN, T

AU - Paasivirta, Lauri

AU - Pedersen, Stephanie

AU - Pohjoismäki, Jaakko

AU - Salmela, Jukka

AU - Vilkamaa, Pekka Antero

AU - Väre, Henry Uolevi

AU - von Tschirnhaus, Michael

AU - Roslin, Tomas Valter

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - DNA sequences offer powerful tools for addressing questions of community ecology:not only do they allow us to identify and describe the community members, but alsoto reveal the biotic interactions between them. Here, we present a recent study (Wirtaet al. 2016) offering a comprehensive library of DNA barcodes for a terrestrial site, theZackenberg region in Northeast Greenland. This library includes almost all macroscopicanimals and vascular plants known from the region. A total of 403 terrestrialanimal and 160 vascular plant species were recorded by morphology-based techniques.DNA barcodes were created with high sequencing success using standard gene regions(CO1 for animals; rbcLa and ITS2 for plants). 92% of the animal taxa were assignedto unique Barcode Index Numbers (BINs) and 93% to monophyletic clusters. Forthe flora, the discriminatory power was lower, with 54% of the plant species formingmonophyletic clusters based on information combined from barcode regions rbcLaand ITS2. In evidence of the utility of the library created, we applied it to communitysamples of arthropods from Malaise traps, thus resolving compositional turnover inspace and time. Nearly 20 000 arthropod individuals were identified from Malaise trapcatches, revealing 122 BINs not detected by previous sampling and DNA barcoding.The insect community proved to be dominated by a few highly abundant taxa, with Diptera being the most abundant order, and Chironomidae the most abundant family.Thus, the DNA barcode library established for the Zackenberg region now offersscope for ecological explorations, for the detailed dissection of interspecific interactionsthroughout the community, and for long-term monitoring. Importantly, the development,application and curation of the library rely heavily on constant collaboration andfeedback between ecologists and taxonomists.

AB - DNA sequences offer powerful tools for addressing questions of community ecology:not only do they allow us to identify and describe the community members, but alsoto reveal the biotic interactions between them. Here, we present a recent study (Wirtaet al. 2016) offering a comprehensive library of DNA barcodes for a terrestrial site, theZackenberg region in Northeast Greenland. This library includes almost all macroscopicanimals and vascular plants known from the region. A total of 403 terrestrialanimal and 160 vascular plant species were recorded by morphology-based techniques.DNA barcodes were created with high sequencing success using standard gene regions(CO1 for animals; rbcLa and ITS2 for plants). 92% of the animal taxa were assignedto unique Barcode Index Numbers (BINs) and 93% to monophyletic clusters. Forthe flora, the discriminatory power was lower, with 54% of the plant species formingmonophyletic clusters based on information combined from barcode regions rbcLaand ITS2. In evidence of the utility of the library created, we applied it to communitysamples of arthropods from Malaise traps, thus resolving compositional turnover inspace and time. Nearly 20 000 arthropod individuals were identified from Malaise trapcatches, revealing 122 BINs not detected by previous sampling and DNA barcoding.The insect community proved to be dominated by a few highly abundant taxa, with Diptera being the most abundant order, and Chironomidae the most abundant family.Thus, the DNA barcode library established for the Zackenberg region now offersscope for ecological explorations, for the detailed dissection of interspecific interactionsthroughout the community, and for long-term monitoring. Importantly, the development,application and curation of the library rely heavily on constant collaboration andfeedback between ecologists and taxonomists.

KW - 1181 Ecology, evolutionary biology

M3 - Article

SP - 222

JO - Acta ZooBot Austria

JF - Acta ZooBot Austria

SN - 2409-367X

IS - 154

ER -