Opportunities and limitations of carbon footprint calculators to steer sustainable household consumption – Analysis of Nordic calculator features

Marja Salo, M.K. Mattinen-Yuryev, Ari Nissinen

Tutkimustuotos: ArtikkelijulkaisuArtikkeliTieteellinenvertaisarvioitu

Kuvaus

The current patterns of household consumption are environmentally unsustainable, especially in wealthy societies such as the Nordic countries. Globally, housing and energy use at home, travel, food, and the consumption of other goods and services contribute to roughly 60e70% of greenhouse gas emissions. Online footprint calculators have been introduced as a soft policy measure in order to raise public awareness of the carbon footprint of ordinary living. We examined ten calculation tools and interviewed six calculator hosts to study calculator features and hosts' expectations and experiences on engaging people to use calculators and to steer consumption. Our findings show that knowledge intensive calculators are designed to support a rational reflection of lifestyle and activities from an environmental perspective. Tips and pledges are presented in calculators to support taking action. However, engaging people to use calculators, especially more than once, is often considered to be challenging. We further discuss our findings with a framework based on practice theories and point out how features of calculators hold potential for further development, as well as have limitations. The limitations should be taken seriously in considering the role of calculators in policy-mixes to steer household consumption. We also propose that future studies on calculators would benefit from practice approaches in order to further explore patterns of calculator (non)use and how calculator use is (dis)connected from the practices they aim to change, and to avoid over emphasising the role of knowledge in reconfiguring practices.
Alkuperäiskielienglanti
LehtiJournal of Cleaner Production
Vuosikerta207
Sivut658-666
Sivumäärä9
ISSN0959-6526
DOI - pysyväislinkit
TilaJulkaistu - 10 tammikuuta 2019
OKM-julkaisutyyppiA1 Alkuperäisartikkeli tieteellisessä aikakauslehdessä, vertaisarvioitu

Tieteenalat

  • 1172 Ympäristötiede

Lainaa tätä

@article{f45a0ddce5de4ea5a9b25c1529b0bd24,
title = "Opportunities and limitations of carbon footprint calculators to steer sustainable household consumption – Analysis of Nordic calculator features",
abstract = "The current patterns of household consumption are environmentally unsustainable, especially in wealthy societies such as the Nordic countries. Globally, housing and energy use at home, travel, food, and the consumption of other goods and services contribute to roughly 60e70{\%} of greenhouse gas emissions. Online footprint calculators have been introduced as a soft policy measure in order to raise public awareness of the carbon footprint of ordinary living. We examined ten calculation tools and interviewed six calculator hosts to study calculator features and hosts' expectations and experiences on engaging people to use calculators and to steer consumption. Our findings show that knowledge intensive calculators are designed to support a rational reflection of lifestyle and activities from an environmental perspective. Tips and pledges are presented in calculators to support taking action. However, engaging people to use calculators, especially more than once, is often considered to be challenging. We further discuss our findings with a framework based on practice theories and point out how features of calculators hold potential for further development, as well as have limitations. The limitations should be taken seriously in considering the role of calculators in policy-mixes to steer household consumption. We also propose that future studies on calculators would benefit from practice approaches in order to further explore patterns of calculator (non)use and how calculator use is (dis)connected from the practices they aim to change, and to avoid over emphasising the role of knowledge in reconfiguring practices.",
keywords = "1172 Environmental sciences, Carbon footprint, Sustainable consumption, Calculator, Practises, Nordic countries, ENVIRONMENTAL-IMPACT, INPUT-OUTPUT, SMART GRIDS, POLICY, INFORMATION, GOVERNANCE, EMISSIONS, BEHAVIOR, OPTIONS, DEMAND",
author = "Marja Salo and M.K. Mattinen-Yuryev and Ari Nissinen",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "10",
doi = "10.1016/j.jclepro.2018.10.035",
language = "English",
volume = "207",
pages = "658--666",
journal = "Journal of Cleaner Production",
issn = "0959-6526",
publisher = "ELSEVIER SCI IRELAND LTD",

}

Opportunities and limitations of carbon footprint calculators to steer sustainable household consumption – Analysis of Nordic calculator features. / Salo, Marja; Mattinen-Yuryev, M.K.; Nissinen, Ari.

julkaisussa: Journal of Cleaner Production, Vuosikerta 207, 10.01.2019, s. 658-666.

Tutkimustuotos: ArtikkelijulkaisuArtikkeliTieteellinenvertaisarvioitu

TY - JOUR

T1 - Opportunities and limitations of carbon footprint calculators to steer sustainable household consumption – Analysis of Nordic calculator features

AU - Salo, Marja

AU - Mattinen-Yuryev, M.K.

AU - Nissinen, Ari

PY - 2019/1/10

Y1 - 2019/1/10

N2 - The current patterns of household consumption are environmentally unsustainable, especially in wealthy societies such as the Nordic countries. Globally, housing and energy use at home, travel, food, and the consumption of other goods and services contribute to roughly 60e70% of greenhouse gas emissions. Online footprint calculators have been introduced as a soft policy measure in order to raise public awareness of the carbon footprint of ordinary living. We examined ten calculation tools and interviewed six calculator hosts to study calculator features and hosts' expectations and experiences on engaging people to use calculators and to steer consumption. Our findings show that knowledge intensive calculators are designed to support a rational reflection of lifestyle and activities from an environmental perspective. Tips and pledges are presented in calculators to support taking action. However, engaging people to use calculators, especially more than once, is often considered to be challenging. We further discuss our findings with a framework based on practice theories and point out how features of calculators hold potential for further development, as well as have limitations. The limitations should be taken seriously in considering the role of calculators in policy-mixes to steer household consumption. We also propose that future studies on calculators would benefit from practice approaches in order to further explore patterns of calculator (non)use and how calculator use is (dis)connected from the practices they aim to change, and to avoid over emphasising the role of knowledge in reconfiguring practices.

AB - The current patterns of household consumption are environmentally unsustainable, especially in wealthy societies such as the Nordic countries. Globally, housing and energy use at home, travel, food, and the consumption of other goods and services contribute to roughly 60e70% of greenhouse gas emissions. Online footprint calculators have been introduced as a soft policy measure in order to raise public awareness of the carbon footprint of ordinary living. We examined ten calculation tools and interviewed six calculator hosts to study calculator features and hosts' expectations and experiences on engaging people to use calculators and to steer consumption. Our findings show that knowledge intensive calculators are designed to support a rational reflection of lifestyle and activities from an environmental perspective. Tips and pledges are presented in calculators to support taking action. However, engaging people to use calculators, especially more than once, is often considered to be challenging. We further discuss our findings with a framework based on practice theories and point out how features of calculators hold potential for further development, as well as have limitations. The limitations should be taken seriously in considering the role of calculators in policy-mixes to steer household consumption. We also propose that future studies on calculators would benefit from practice approaches in order to further explore patterns of calculator (non)use and how calculator use is (dis)connected from the practices they aim to change, and to avoid over emphasising the role of knowledge in reconfiguring practices.

KW - 1172 Environmental sciences

KW - Carbon footprint

KW - Sustainable consumption

KW - Calculator

KW - Practises

KW - Nordic countries

KW - ENVIRONMENTAL-IMPACT

KW - INPUT-OUTPUT

KW - SMART GRIDS

KW - POLICY

KW - INFORMATION

KW - GOVERNANCE

KW - EMISSIONS

KW - BEHAVIOR

KW - OPTIONS

KW - DEMAND

U2 - 10.1016/j.jclepro.2018.10.035

DO - 10.1016/j.jclepro.2018.10.035

M3 - Article

VL - 207

SP - 658

EP - 666

JO - Journal of Cleaner Production

JF - Journal of Cleaner Production

SN - 0959-6526

ER -