Optimum juvenile density, harvesting, and stand structure in even-aged Scots pine stands

Kari Hyytiäinen, Olli Tahvonen, Lauri Valsta

Tutkimustuotos: ArtikkelijulkaisuArtikkeliTieteellinenvertaisarvioitu

Kuvaus

The economics of timber production is studied using empirical data for various juvenile densities and a distance-independent individual-tree growth model specified for Finnish Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris [L.]) stands. Our results imply that explicit inclusion of quality effects on prices increases optimum juvenile density. In addition, quality effects make economic surplus of forestry more sensitive to variations in juvenile density. Optimum thinnings remove trees that have no prospects for high relative value growth. Optimum thinnings are selective thinnings that remove inferior-quality trees, some of the smallest trees and, contrary to conventions, those of the largest trees that fulfill the sawlog dimensions. Thinnings removing trees strictly above and/or below certain tree diameters homogenize the remaining growing stock by narrowing the diameter distribution. Homogeneous stand structure is economically favorable at final clearcutting because the stand can be clearcut promptly after the majority of trees have reached sawlog dimensions and have experienced the last high peak in value growth.
Alkuperäiskielienglanti
LehtiForest Science
Vuosikerta51
Numero2
Sivut120-133
Sivumäärä14
ISSN0015-749X
TilaJulkaistu - 2005
OKM-julkaisutyyppiA1 Alkuperäisartikkeli tieteellisessä aikakauslehdessä, vertaisarvioitu

Tieteenalat

  • 411 Maatalous ja metsätieteet

Lainaa tätä

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title = "Optimum juvenile density, harvesting, and stand structure in even-aged Scots pine stands",
abstract = "The economics of timber production is studied using empirical data for various juvenile densities and a distance-independent individual-tree growth model specified for Finnish Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris [L.]) stands. Our results imply that explicit inclusion of quality effects on prices increases optimum juvenile density. In addition, quality effects make economic surplus of forestry more sensitive to variations in juvenile density. Optimum thinnings remove trees that have no prospects for high relative value growth. Optimum thinnings are selective thinnings that remove inferior-quality trees, some of the smallest trees and, contrary to conventions, those of the largest trees that fulfill the sawlog dimensions. Thinnings removing trees strictly above and/or below certain tree diameters homogenize the remaining growing stock by narrowing the diameter distribution. Homogeneous stand structure is economically favorable at final clearcutting because the stand can be clearcut promptly after the majority of trees have reached sawlog dimensions and have experienced the last high peak in value growth.",
keywords = "411 Agriculture and forestry",
author = "Kari Hyyti{\"a}inen and Olli Tahvonen and Lauri Valsta",
year = "2005",
language = "English",
volume = "51",
pages = "120--133",
journal = "Forest Science",
issn = "0015-749X",
publisher = "Society of American Foresters",
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Optimum juvenile density, harvesting, and stand structure in even-aged Scots pine stands. / Hyytiäinen, Kari; Tahvonen, Olli; Valsta, Lauri.

julkaisussa: Forest Science, Vuosikerta 51, Nro 2, 2005, s. 120-133.

Tutkimustuotos: ArtikkelijulkaisuArtikkeliTieteellinenvertaisarvioitu

TY - JOUR

T1 - Optimum juvenile density, harvesting, and stand structure in even-aged Scots pine stands

AU - Hyytiäinen, Kari

AU - Tahvonen, Olli

AU - Valsta, Lauri

PY - 2005

Y1 - 2005

N2 - The economics of timber production is studied using empirical data for various juvenile densities and a distance-independent individual-tree growth model specified for Finnish Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris [L.]) stands. Our results imply that explicit inclusion of quality effects on prices increases optimum juvenile density. In addition, quality effects make economic surplus of forestry more sensitive to variations in juvenile density. Optimum thinnings remove trees that have no prospects for high relative value growth. Optimum thinnings are selective thinnings that remove inferior-quality trees, some of the smallest trees and, contrary to conventions, those of the largest trees that fulfill the sawlog dimensions. Thinnings removing trees strictly above and/or below certain tree diameters homogenize the remaining growing stock by narrowing the diameter distribution. Homogeneous stand structure is economically favorable at final clearcutting because the stand can be clearcut promptly after the majority of trees have reached sawlog dimensions and have experienced the last high peak in value growth.

AB - The economics of timber production is studied using empirical data for various juvenile densities and a distance-independent individual-tree growth model specified for Finnish Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris [L.]) stands. Our results imply that explicit inclusion of quality effects on prices increases optimum juvenile density. In addition, quality effects make economic surplus of forestry more sensitive to variations in juvenile density. Optimum thinnings remove trees that have no prospects for high relative value growth. Optimum thinnings are selective thinnings that remove inferior-quality trees, some of the smallest trees and, contrary to conventions, those of the largest trees that fulfill the sawlog dimensions. Thinnings removing trees strictly above and/or below certain tree diameters homogenize the remaining growing stock by narrowing the diameter distribution. Homogeneous stand structure is economically favorable at final clearcutting because the stand can be clearcut promptly after the majority of trees have reached sawlog dimensions and have experienced the last high peak in value growth.

KW - 411 Agriculture and forestry

M3 - Article

VL - 51

SP - 120

EP - 133

JO - Forest Science

JF - Forest Science

SN - 0015-749X

IS - 2

ER -