Osmolality and non-structural carbohydrate composition in the secondary phloem of trees across a latitudinal gradient in Europe

Anna Matilda Lintunen, Teemu Ville Santeri Paljakka, Tuula Jyske, Mikko Peltoniemi, Frank Sterck, Georg Von Arx, Hervé Cochard, Paul Copini, Maria C. Caldeira, Sylvain Delzon, Roman Gebauer, Leila Henrietta Grönlund, Natasa Kiorapostolou, Silvia Lechthaler, Raquel Lobo-do-Vale, Richard L. Peters, Giai Petit, Angela L. Prendin, Yann Louis Baptiste Salmon, Kathy Steppe & 4 muut Josef Urban, Silvia Roig Juan, Elisabeth M. Robert, Teemu Samuli Hölttä

Tutkimustuotos: ArtikkelijulkaisuArtikkeliTieteellinenvertaisarvioitu

Kuvaus

Phloem osmolality and its components are involved in basic cell metabolism, cell growth, and in various physiological processes including the ability of living cells to withstand drought and frost. Osmolality and sugar composition responses to environmental stresses have been extensively studied for leaves, but less for the secondary phloem of plant stems and branches. Leaf osmotic concentration and the share of pinitol and raffinose among soluble sugars increase with increasing drought or cold stress, and osmotic concentration is adjusted with osmoregulation. We hypothesize that similar responses occur in the secondary phloem of branches. We collected living bark samples from branches of adult Pinus sylvestris, Picea abies, Betula pendula and Populus tremula trees across Europe, from boreal Northern Finland to Mediterranean Portugal. In all studied species, the observed variation in phloem osmolality was mainly driven by variation in phloem water content, while tissue solute content was rather constant across regions. Osmoregulation, in which osmolality is controlled by variable tissue solute content, was stronger for Betula and Populus in comparison to the evergreen conifers. Osmolality was lowest in mid-latitude region, and from there increased by 37% toward northern Europe and 38% toward southern Europe due to low phloem water content in these regions. The ratio of raffinose to all soluble sugars was negligible at mid-latitudes and increased toward north and south, reflecting its role in cold and drought tolerance. For pinitol, another sugar known for contributing to stress tolerance, no such latitudinal pattern was observed. The proportion of sucrose was remarkably low and that of hexoses (i.e., glucose and fructose) high at mid-latitudes. The ratio of starch to all non-structural carbohydrates increased toward the northern latitudes in agreement with the build-up of osmotically inactive C reservoir that can be converted into soluble sugars during winter acclimation in these cold regions. Present results for the secondary phloem of trees suggest that adjustment with tissue water content plays an important role in osmolality dynamics. Furthermore, trees acclimated to dry and cold climate showed high phloem osmolality and raffinose proportion.
Alkuperäiskielienglanti
Artikkeli726
LehtiFrontiers in plant science
Vuosikerta7
Sivumäärä15
ISSN1664-462X
DOI - pysyväislinkit
TilaJulkaistu - 2016
OKM-julkaisutyyppiA1 Alkuperäisartikkeli tieteellisessä aikakauslehdessä, vertaisarvioitu

Tieteenalat

  • 4112 Metsätiede

Lainaa tätä

Lintunen, Anna Matilda ; Paljakka, Teemu Ville Santeri ; Jyske, Tuula ; Peltoniemi, Mikko ; Sterck, Frank ; Von Arx, Georg ; Cochard, Hervé ; Copini, Paul ; Caldeira, Maria C. ; Delzon, Sylvain ; Gebauer, Roman ; Grönlund, Leila Henrietta ; Kiorapostolou, Natasa ; Lechthaler, Silvia ; Lobo-do-Vale, Raquel ; Peters, Richard L. ; Petit, Giai ; Prendin, Angela L. ; Salmon, Yann Louis Baptiste ; Steppe, Kathy ; Urban, Josef ; Roig Juan, Silvia ; Robert, Elisabeth M. ; Hölttä, Teemu Samuli. / Osmolality and non-structural carbohydrate composition in the secondary phloem of trees across a latitudinal gradient in Europe. Julkaisussa: Frontiers in plant science. 2016 ; Vuosikerta 7.
@article{8f0ecb5c1fc64371a6afe80af482b857,
title = "Osmolality and non-structural carbohydrate composition in the secondary phloem of trees across a latitudinal gradient in Europe",
abstract = "Phloem osmolality and its components are involved in basic cell metabolism, cell growth, and in various physiological processes including the ability of living cells to withstand drought and frost. Osmolality and sugar composition responses to environmental stresses have been extensively studied for leaves, but less for the secondary phloem of plant stems and branches. Leaf osmotic concentration and the share of pinitol and raffinose among soluble sugars increase with increasing drought or cold stress, and osmotic concentration is adjusted with osmoregulation. We hypothesize that similar responses occur in the secondary phloem of branches. We collected living bark samples from branches of adult Pinus sylvestris, Picea abies, Betula pendula and Populus tremula trees across Europe, from boreal Northern Finland to Mediterranean Portugal. In all studied species, the observed variation in phloem osmolality was mainly driven by variation in phloem water content, while tissue solute content was rather constant across regions. Osmoregulation, in which osmolality is controlled by variable tissue solute content, was stronger for Betula and Populus in comparison to the evergreen conifers. Osmolality was lowest in mid-latitude region, and from there increased by 37{\%} toward northern Europe and 38{\%} toward southern Europe due to low phloem water content in these regions. The ratio of raffinose to all soluble sugars was negligible at mid-latitudes and increased toward north and south, reflecting its role in cold and drought tolerance. For pinitol, another sugar known for contributing to stress tolerance, no such latitudinal pattern was observed. The proportion of sucrose was remarkably low and that of hexoses (i.e., glucose and fructose) high at mid-latitudes. The ratio of starch to all non-structural carbohydrates increased toward the northern latitudes in agreement with the build-up of osmotically inactive C reservoir that can be converted into soluble sugars during winter acclimation in these cold regions. Present results for the secondary phloem of trees suggest that adjustment with tissue water content plays an important role in osmolality dynamics. Furthermore, trees acclimated to dry and cold climate showed high phloem osmolality and raffinose proportion.",
keywords = "4112 Forestry",
author = "Lintunen, {Anna Matilda} and Paljakka, {Teemu Ville Santeri} and Tuula Jyske and Mikko Peltoniemi and Frank Sterck and {Von Arx}, Georg and Herv{\'e} Cochard and Paul Copini and Caldeira, {Maria C.} and Sylvain Delzon and Roman Gebauer and Gr{\"o}nlund, {Leila Henrietta} and Natasa Kiorapostolou and Silvia Lechthaler and Raquel Lobo-do-Vale and Peters, {Richard L.} and Giai Petit and Prendin, {Angela L.} and Salmon, {Yann Louis Baptiste} and Kathy Steppe and Josef Urban and {Roig Juan}, Silvia and Robert, {Elisabeth M.} and H{\"o}ltt{\"a}, {Teemu Samuli}",
year = "2016",
doi = "10.3389/fpls.2016.00726",
language = "English",
volume = "7",
journal = "Frontiers in plant science",
issn = "1664-462X",
publisher = "Frontiers Media",

}

Lintunen, AM, Paljakka, TVS, Jyske, T, Peltoniemi, M, Sterck, F, Von Arx, G, Cochard, H, Copini, P, Caldeira, MC, Delzon, S, Gebauer, R, Grönlund, LH, Kiorapostolou, N, Lechthaler, S, Lobo-do-Vale, R, Peters, RL, Petit, G, Prendin, AL, Salmon, YLB, Steppe, K, Urban, J, Roig Juan, S, Robert, EM & Hölttä, TS 2016, 'Osmolality and non-structural carbohydrate composition in the secondary phloem of trees across a latitudinal gradient in Europe', Frontiers in plant science, Vuosikerta 7, 726. https://doi.org/10.3389/fpls.2016.00726

Osmolality and non-structural carbohydrate composition in the secondary phloem of trees across a latitudinal gradient in Europe. / Lintunen, Anna Matilda; Paljakka, Teemu Ville Santeri; Jyske, Tuula; Peltoniemi, Mikko; Sterck, Frank; Von Arx, Georg; Cochard, Hervé; Copini, Paul; Caldeira, Maria C.; Delzon, Sylvain; Gebauer, Roman; Grönlund, Leila Henrietta; Kiorapostolou, Natasa; Lechthaler, Silvia; Lobo-do-Vale, Raquel; Peters, Richard L. ; Petit, Giai; Prendin, Angela L.; Salmon, Yann Louis Baptiste; Steppe, Kathy; Urban, Josef; Roig Juan, Silvia; Robert, Elisabeth M.; Hölttä, Teemu Samuli.

julkaisussa: Frontiers in plant science, Vuosikerta 7, 726, 2016.

Tutkimustuotos: ArtikkelijulkaisuArtikkeliTieteellinenvertaisarvioitu

TY - JOUR

T1 - Osmolality and non-structural carbohydrate composition in the secondary phloem of trees across a latitudinal gradient in Europe

AU - Lintunen, Anna Matilda

AU - Paljakka, Teemu Ville Santeri

AU - Jyske, Tuula

AU - Peltoniemi, Mikko

AU - Sterck, Frank

AU - Von Arx, Georg

AU - Cochard, Hervé

AU - Copini, Paul

AU - Caldeira, Maria C.

AU - Delzon, Sylvain

AU - Gebauer, Roman

AU - Grönlund, Leila Henrietta

AU - Kiorapostolou, Natasa

AU - Lechthaler, Silvia

AU - Lobo-do-Vale, Raquel

AU - Peters, Richard L.

AU - Petit, Giai

AU - Prendin, Angela L.

AU - Salmon, Yann Louis Baptiste

AU - Steppe, Kathy

AU - Urban, Josef

AU - Roig Juan, Silvia

AU - Robert, Elisabeth M.

AU - Hölttä, Teemu Samuli

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - Phloem osmolality and its components are involved in basic cell metabolism, cell growth, and in various physiological processes including the ability of living cells to withstand drought and frost. Osmolality and sugar composition responses to environmental stresses have been extensively studied for leaves, but less for the secondary phloem of plant stems and branches. Leaf osmotic concentration and the share of pinitol and raffinose among soluble sugars increase with increasing drought or cold stress, and osmotic concentration is adjusted with osmoregulation. We hypothesize that similar responses occur in the secondary phloem of branches. We collected living bark samples from branches of adult Pinus sylvestris, Picea abies, Betula pendula and Populus tremula trees across Europe, from boreal Northern Finland to Mediterranean Portugal. In all studied species, the observed variation in phloem osmolality was mainly driven by variation in phloem water content, while tissue solute content was rather constant across regions. Osmoregulation, in which osmolality is controlled by variable tissue solute content, was stronger for Betula and Populus in comparison to the evergreen conifers. Osmolality was lowest in mid-latitude region, and from there increased by 37% toward northern Europe and 38% toward southern Europe due to low phloem water content in these regions. The ratio of raffinose to all soluble sugars was negligible at mid-latitudes and increased toward north and south, reflecting its role in cold and drought tolerance. For pinitol, another sugar known for contributing to stress tolerance, no such latitudinal pattern was observed. The proportion of sucrose was remarkably low and that of hexoses (i.e., glucose and fructose) high at mid-latitudes. The ratio of starch to all non-structural carbohydrates increased toward the northern latitudes in agreement with the build-up of osmotically inactive C reservoir that can be converted into soluble sugars during winter acclimation in these cold regions. Present results for the secondary phloem of trees suggest that adjustment with tissue water content plays an important role in osmolality dynamics. Furthermore, trees acclimated to dry and cold climate showed high phloem osmolality and raffinose proportion.

AB - Phloem osmolality and its components are involved in basic cell metabolism, cell growth, and in various physiological processes including the ability of living cells to withstand drought and frost. Osmolality and sugar composition responses to environmental stresses have been extensively studied for leaves, but less for the secondary phloem of plant stems and branches. Leaf osmotic concentration and the share of pinitol and raffinose among soluble sugars increase with increasing drought or cold stress, and osmotic concentration is adjusted with osmoregulation. We hypothesize that similar responses occur in the secondary phloem of branches. We collected living bark samples from branches of adult Pinus sylvestris, Picea abies, Betula pendula and Populus tremula trees across Europe, from boreal Northern Finland to Mediterranean Portugal. In all studied species, the observed variation in phloem osmolality was mainly driven by variation in phloem water content, while tissue solute content was rather constant across regions. Osmoregulation, in which osmolality is controlled by variable tissue solute content, was stronger for Betula and Populus in comparison to the evergreen conifers. Osmolality was lowest in mid-latitude region, and from there increased by 37% toward northern Europe and 38% toward southern Europe due to low phloem water content in these regions. The ratio of raffinose to all soluble sugars was negligible at mid-latitudes and increased toward north and south, reflecting its role in cold and drought tolerance. For pinitol, another sugar known for contributing to stress tolerance, no such latitudinal pattern was observed. The proportion of sucrose was remarkably low and that of hexoses (i.e., glucose and fructose) high at mid-latitudes. The ratio of starch to all non-structural carbohydrates increased toward the northern latitudes in agreement with the build-up of osmotically inactive C reservoir that can be converted into soluble sugars during winter acclimation in these cold regions. Present results for the secondary phloem of trees suggest that adjustment with tissue water content plays an important role in osmolality dynamics. Furthermore, trees acclimated to dry and cold climate showed high phloem osmolality and raffinose proportion.

KW - 4112 Forestry

UR - http://journal.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fpls.2016.00726/full

U2 - 10.3389/fpls.2016.00726

DO - 10.3389/fpls.2016.00726

M3 - Article

VL - 7

JO - Frontiers in plant science

JF - Frontiers in plant science

SN - 1664-462X

M1 - 726

ER -