Philo and the Valentinians

Protology, Cosmogony, and Anthropology

Risto Tapio Auvinen

Tutkimustuotos: OpinnäyteVäitöskirjaMonografia

Kuvaus

The aim of this study is to compare philosophical and exegetical traditions in the writings of Philo of Alexandria and in the Valentinian sources. Although Valentinus's fragments contain some Philonic themes, the closest parallels with Philo come from section C (chapters 43.2-65) in the Excerpts from Theodotus by Clement of Alexandria, which parallels teachings of Ptolemy's disciples attested in Irenaeus Valentinian account in Iren. Haer. 1.1-7. I will argue in this study that Valentinian theology in these sources cannot be properly understood without recourse to Philo's inventions in the allegorical exegesis of the Book of Genesis. On the one hand, the Valentinians elaborated the allegories attested to in Philo's writings in the light of the myth of Sophia. On the other hand, the Valentinian theologians reformed the preceding Gnostic myth in the light of teachings that they found in Philo's writings. The Valentinian protological model system developed on the grounds of a Platonizing interpretation of the prologue of the Gospel of John. The Valentinian teachers twisted the semantic and logical structure of the prologue of John's gospel in a way which indicates that they also knew some of Philo's protological innovations. In the Valentinian accounts, Wisdom has manifold associations, which are related to the dyadic and monadic aspects of the divine world. These associations are found in an initial stage in Philo's texts. Philo and Valentinians were also dependent on the ancient theory of diakrisis according to which cosmic matter was divided into four cosmic elements. Taking into account all these protological and cosmological parallels, it is reasonable to suggest that the Valentinian teachers were working in the allegorical tradition in which many of Philo's interpretations were adopted, rejected and reformed. In anthropology, Philo and Valentinian teachers were dependent on the Middle Platonic anthropological theories, which formed the philosophical background for the allegorical interpretations of Gen. 1:26-27 and Gen. 2:7. The closest parallels with Philo are found in the anthropological interpretations of Genesis, which form the basis for soteriology and ethics. The allegory of Israel and the allegory of Cain, Abel and Seth attested in the Valentinian sources were derived from Philo's works. On the grounds of this study, it is reasonable to suggest that there was a historical relationship between Philo and the Valentinians. The relation was restricted, however, to one group of Valentinians whose teachings go back to the school of Ptolemy in Alexandria and Rome. This study shows that it is probable that some Valentinian teachers belonged to the circle of Alexandrian Christian Platonists who saw Philo's works as valuable and preserved them after the revolt, that is, before they became the property of the Alexandrian Catechetical School at the end of the second century.
Alkuperäiskielienglanti
Myöntävä instituutio
  • Helsingin yliopisto
Valvoja/neuvonantaja
  • Dunderberg, Ismo, Valvoja
Myöntöpäivämäärä4 helmikuuta 2017
JulkaisupaikkaHelsinki
Kustantaja
Painoksen ISBN978-951-51-2814-0
Sähköinen ISBN978-951-51-2815-7
TilaJulkaistu - 4 helmikuuta 2017
OKM-julkaisutyyppiG4 Tohtorinväitöskirja (monografia)

Tieteenalat

  • 614 Teologia

Lainaa tätä

Auvinen, R. T. (2017). Philo and the Valentinians: Protology, Cosmogony, and Anthropology. Helsinki: University of Helsinki.
Auvinen, Risto Tapio. / Philo and the Valentinians : Protology, Cosmogony, and Anthropology. Helsinki : University of Helsinki, 2017. 253 Sivumäärä
@phdthesis{ccecd1e831714dfc937dc9fd62ee6d5d,
title = "Philo and the Valentinians: Protology, Cosmogony, and Anthropology",
abstract = "The aim of this study is to compare philosophical and exegetical traditions in the writings of Philo of Alexandria and in the Valentinian sources. Although Valentinus's fragments contain some Philonic themes, the closest parallels with Philo come from section C (chapters 43.2-65) in the Excerpts from Theodotus by Clement of Alexandria, which parallels teachings of Ptolemy's disciples attested in Irenaeus Valentinian account in Iren. Haer. 1.1-7. I will argue in this study that Valentinian theology in these sources cannot be properly understood without recourse to Philo's inventions in the allegorical exegesis of the Book of Genesis. On the one hand, the Valentinians elaborated the allegories attested to in Philo's writings in the light of the myth of Sophia. On the other hand, the Valentinian theologians reformed the preceding Gnostic myth in the light of teachings that they found in Philo's writings. The Valentinian protological model system developed on the grounds of a Platonizing interpretation of the prologue of the Gospel of John. The Valentinian teachers twisted the semantic and logical structure of the prologue of John's gospel in a way which indicates that they also knew some of Philo's protological innovations. In the Valentinian accounts, Wisdom has manifold associations, which are related to the dyadic and monadic aspects of the divine world. These associations are found in an initial stage in Philo's texts. Philo and Valentinians were also dependent on the ancient theory of diakrisis according to which cosmic matter was divided into four cosmic elements. Taking into account all these protological and cosmological parallels, it is reasonable to suggest that the Valentinian teachers were working in the allegorical tradition in which many of Philo's interpretations were adopted, rejected and reformed. In anthropology, Philo and Valentinian teachers were dependent on the Middle Platonic anthropological theories, which formed the philosophical background for the allegorical interpretations of Gen. 1:26-27 and Gen. 2:7. The closest parallels with Philo are found in the anthropological interpretations of Genesis, which form the basis for soteriology and ethics. The allegory of Israel and the allegory of Cain, Abel and Seth attested in the Valentinian sources were derived from Philo's works. On the grounds of this study, it is reasonable to suggest that there was a historical relationship between Philo and the Valentinians. The relation was restricted, however, to one group of Valentinians whose teachings go back to the school of Ptolemy in Alexandria and Rome. This study shows that it is probable that some Valentinian teachers belonged to the circle of Alexandrian Christian Platonists who saw Philo's works as valuable and preserved them after the revolt, that is, before they became the property of the Alexandrian Catechetical School at the end of the second century.",
keywords = "614 Theology",
author = "Auvinen, {Risto Tapio}",
year = "2017",
month = "2",
day = "4",
language = "English",
isbn = "978-951-51-2814-0",
publisher = "University of Helsinki",
address = "Finland",
school = "University of Helsinki",

}

Auvinen, RT 2017, 'Philo and the Valentinians: Protology, Cosmogony, and Anthropology', Helsingin yliopisto, Helsinki.

Philo and the Valentinians : Protology, Cosmogony, and Anthropology. / Auvinen, Risto Tapio.

Helsinki : University of Helsinki, 2017. 253 s.

Tutkimustuotos: OpinnäyteVäitöskirjaMonografia

TY - THES

T1 - Philo and the Valentinians

T2 - Protology, Cosmogony, and Anthropology

AU - Auvinen, Risto Tapio

PY - 2017/2/4

Y1 - 2017/2/4

N2 - The aim of this study is to compare philosophical and exegetical traditions in the writings of Philo of Alexandria and in the Valentinian sources. Although Valentinus's fragments contain some Philonic themes, the closest parallels with Philo come from section C (chapters 43.2-65) in the Excerpts from Theodotus by Clement of Alexandria, which parallels teachings of Ptolemy's disciples attested in Irenaeus Valentinian account in Iren. Haer. 1.1-7. I will argue in this study that Valentinian theology in these sources cannot be properly understood without recourse to Philo's inventions in the allegorical exegesis of the Book of Genesis. On the one hand, the Valentinians elaborated the allegories attested to in Philo's writings in the light of the myth of Sophia. On the other hand, the Valentinian theologians reformed the preceding Gnostic myth in the light of teachings that they found in Philo's writings. The Valentinian protological model system developed on the grounds of a Platonizing interpretation of the prologue of the Gospel of John. The Valentinian teachers twisted the semantic and logical structure of the prologue of John's gospel in a way which indicates that they also knew some of Philo's protological innovations. In the Valentinian accounts, Wisdom has manifold associations, which are related to the dyadic and monadic aspects of the divine world. These associations are found in an initial stage in Philo's texts. Philo and Valentinians were also dependent on the ancient theory of diakrisis according to which cosmic matter was divided into four cosmic elements. Taking into account all these protological and cosmological parallels, it is reasonable to suggest that the Valentinian teachers were working in the allegorical tradition in which many of Philo's interpretations were adopted, rejected and reformed. In anthropology, Philo and Valentinian teachers were dependent on the Middle Platonic anthropological theories, which formed the philosophical background for the allegorical interpretations of Gen. 1:26-27 and Gen. 2:7. The closest parallels with Philo are found in the anthropological interpretations of Genesis, which form the basis for soteriology and ethics. The allegory of Israel and the allegory of Cain, Abel and Seth attested in the Valentinian sources were derived from Philo's works. On the grounds of this study, it is reasonable to suggest that there was a historical relationship between Philo and the Valentinians. The relation was restricted, however, to one group of Valentinians whose teachings go back to the school of Ptolemy in Alexandria and Rome. This study shows that it is probable that some Valentinian teachers belonged to the circle of Alexandrian Christian Platonists who saw Philo's works as valuable and preserved them after the revolt, that is, before they became the property of the Alexandrian Catechetical School at the end of the second century.

AB - The aim of this study is to compare philosophical and exegetical traditions in the writings of Philo of Alexandria and in the Valentinian sources. Although Valentinus's fragments contain some Philonic themes, the closest parallels with Philo come from section C (chapters 43.2-65) in the Excerpts from Theodotus by Clement of Alexandria, which parallels teachings of Ptolemy's disciples attested in Irenaeus Valentinian account in Iren. Haer. 1.1-7. I will argue in this study that Valentinian theology in these sources cannot be properly understood without recourse to Philo's inventions in the allegorical exegesis of the Book of Genesis. On the one hand, the Valentinians elaborated the allegories attested to in Philo's writings in the light of the myth of Sophia. On the other hand, the Valentinian theologians reformed the preceding Gnostic myth in the light of teachings that they found in Philo's writings. The Valentinian protological model system developed on the grounds of a Platonizing interpretation of the prologue of the Gospel of John. The Valentinian teachers twisted the semantic and logical structure of the prologue of John's gospel in a way which indicates that they also knew some of Philo's protological innovations. In the Valentinian accounts, Wisdom has manifold associations, which are related to the dyadic and monadic aspects of the divine world. These associations are found in an initial stage in Philo's texts. Philo and Valentinians were also dependent on the ancient theory of diakrisis according to which cosmic matter was divided into four cosmic elements. Taking into account all these protological and cosmological parallels, it is reasonable to suggest that the Valentinian teachers were working in the allegorical tradition in which many of Philo's interpretations were adopted, rejected and reformed. In anthropology, Philo and Valentinian teachers were dependent on the Middle Platonic anthropological theories, which formed the philosophical background for the allegorical interpretations of Gen. 1:26-27 and Gen. 2:7. The closest parallels with Philo are found in the anthropological interpretations of Genesis, which form the basis for soteriology and ethics. The allegory of Israel and the allegory of Cain, Abel and Seth attested in the Valentinian sources were derived from Philo's works. On the grounds of this study, it is reasonable to suggest that there was a historical relationship between Philo and the Valentinians. The relation was restricted, however, to one group of Valentinians whose teachings go back to the school of Ptolemy in Alexandria and Rome. This study shows that it is probable that some Valentinian teachers belonged to the circle of Alexandrian Christian Platonists who saw Philo's works as valuable and preserved them after the revolt, that is, before they became the property of the Alexandrian Catechetical School at the end of the second century.

KW - 614 Theology

M3 - Doctoral Thesis

SN - 978-951-51-2814-0

PB - University of Helsinki

CY - Helsinki

ER -

Auvinen RT. Philo and the Valentinians: Protology, Cosmogony, and Anthropology. Helsinki: University of Helsinki, 2017. 253 s.