Queering Un/Common Ecologies of Death

Marietta Izolda Radomska

Tutkimustuotos: Artikkeli kirjassa/raportissa/konferenssijulkaisussaKonferenssiartikkeliTieteellinenvertaisarvioitu

Kuvaus

Paper presented at (Un)Common Worlds: Human-Animal Studies Conference, 7-9 August 2018, Turku, FI.
Abstract:
The ecological crises –
often seen as a key component of the Anthropocene – render certain
habitats unliveable, leading to the death of individuals and populations.
While some indicate that
the notion of the Anthropocene reinforces the
hegemonic position and
exceptionalism of the
human subject, it also
becomes evident that, in
this context, the stories
of species extinction and
nonhuman death are profoundly entangled with
the histories of colonial
violence and elimination
of the non-normative human other.
Whilst bioscience emphasises interdependency, commonality and
relationality as crucial
characteristics of life
shared by all organisms,
Western cultural imaginaries tend to draw a
thick dividing line between human and nonhuman animals, particularly
evident in the context
of death. On the one
hand, death appears as
a process common to all
forms of life; on the other,
as an event that distinguishes human from other organisms. This split
is paralleled by a dualistic approach to the human corpse itself: ‘dead’
matter is predominantly
framed by either the secularized discourse on the
sanctity and uniqueness
of the dead body, or the
narratives on its ‘abject’
character.
There is a lack of sufficient theorising of the
messy intimacies between materialities of
human and nonhuman
kind that form part of
the processes of death
and dying. Our cultural
understandings require
narratives attentive to
relationalities and entanglements of the living and non-living, and
human and nonhuman,
which I call ‘ecologies of
death’.
By reading select contemporary eco-artworks
and philosophical and
scientific accounts on
death in a more-than-human world through one
another, this paper aims
to explore and queer the
ecologies and ontologies
of death in the un/common world of the Anthropocene.
Alkuperäiskielienglanti
Otsikko(Un)Common Worlds
Sivumäärä15
Julkaisupäivä2018
TilaJulkaisematon - 2018
OKM-julkaisutyyppiA4 Artikkeli konferenssijulkaisuussa
Tapahtuma(Un)Common Worlds: Human-Animal Studies Conference — 7–9 August 2018 Turku, Finland - Turun yliopisto, Turku, Suomi
Kesto: 7 elokuuta 20189 elokuuta 2018
https://uncommonworlds.com/

Lisätietoja

Paper presented at (Un)Common Worlds: Human-Animal Studies Conference, 7-9 August 2018, Turku, FI.

Tieteenalat

  • 6160 Muut humanistiset tieteet

Lainaa tätä

Radomska, M. I. (2018). Queering Un/Common Ecologies of Death. Julkaisematon. teoksessa (Un)Common Worlds
Radomska, Marietta Izolda. / Queering Un/Common Ecologies of Death. (Un)Common Worlds. 2018.
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title = "Queering Un/Common Ecologies of Death",
abstract = "Paper presented at (Un)Common Worlds: Human-Animal Studies Conference, 7-9 August 2018, Turku, FI.Abstract:The ecological crises –often seen as a key component of the Anthropocene – render certainhabitats unliveable, leading to the death of individuals and populations.While some indicate thatthe notion of the Anthropocene reinforces thehegemonic position andexceptionalism of thehuman subject, it alsobecomes evident that, inthis context, the storiesof species extinction andnonhuman death are profoundly entangled withthe histories of colonialviolence and eliminationof the non-normative human other.Whilst bioscience emphasises interdependency, commonality andrelationality as crucialcharacteristics of lifeshared by all organisms,Western cultural imaginaries tend to draw athick dividing line between human and nonhuman animals, particularlyevident in the contextof death. On the onehand, death appears asa process common to allforms of life; on the other,as an event that distinguishes human from other organisms. This splitis paralleled by a dualistic approach to the human corpse itself: ‘dead’matter is predominantlyframed by either the secularized discourse on thesanctity and uniquenessof the dead body, or thenarratives on its ‘abject’character.There is a lack of sufficient theorising of themessy intimacies between materialities ofhuman and nonhumankind that form part ofthe processes of deathand dying. Our culturalunderstandings requirenarratives attentive torelationalities and entanglements of the living and non-living, andhuman and nonhuman,which I call ‘ecologies ofdeath’.By reading select contemporary eco-artworksand philosophical andscientific accounts ondeath in a more-than-human world through oneanother, this paper aimsto explore and queer theecologies and ontologiesof death in the un/common world of the Anthropocene.",
keywords = "6160 Other humanities, Queer Death Studies, Queer Ecologies, Animal Studies, Bioart, Feminist Philosophy",
author = "Radomska, {Marietta Izolda}",
note = "Paper presented at (Un)Common Worlds: Human-Animal Studies Conference, 7-9 August 2018, Turku, FI.",
year = "2018",
language = "English",
booktitle = "(Un)Common Worlds",

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Radomska, MI 2018, Queering Un/Common Ecologies of Death. julkaisussa (Un)Common Worlds. (Un)Common Worlds, Turku, Suomi, 07/08/2018.

Queering Un/Common Ecologies of Death. / Radomska, Marietta Izolda.

(Un)Common Worlds. 2018.

Tutkimustuotos: Artikkeli kirjassa/raportissa/konferenssijulkaisussaKonferenssiartikkeliTieteellinenvertaisarvioitu

TY - GEN

T1 - Queering Un/Common Ecologies of Death

AU - Radomska, Marietta Izolda

N1 - Paper presented at (Un)Common Worlds: Human-Animal Studies Conference, 7-9 August 2018, Turku, FI.

PY - 2018

Y1 - 2018

N2 - Paper presented at (Un)Common Worlds: Human-Animal Studies Conference, 7-9 August 2018, Turku, FI.Abstract:The ecological crises –often seen as a key component of the Anthropocene – render certainhabitats unliveable, leading to the death of individuals and populations.While some indicate thatthe notion of the Anthropocene reinforces thehegemonic position andexceptionalism of thehuman subject, it alsobecomes evident that, inthis context, the storiesof species extinction andnonhuman death are profoundly entangled withthe histories of colonialviolence and eliminationof the non-normative human other.Whilst bioscience emphasises interdependency, commonality andrelationality as crucialcharacteristics of lifeshared by all organisms,Western cultural imaginaries tend to draw athick dividing line between human and nonhuman animals, particularlyevident in the contextof death. On the onehand, death appears asa process common to allforms of life; on the other,as an event that distinguishes human from other organisms. This splitis paralleled by a dualistic approach to the human corpse itself: ‘dead’matter is predominantlyframed by either the secularized discourse on thesanctity and uniquenessof the dead body, or thenarratives on its ‘abject’character.There is a lack of sufficient theorising of themessy intimacies between materialities ofhuman and nonhumankind that form part ofthe processes of deathand dying. Our culturalunderstandings requirenarratives attentive torelationalities and entanglements of the living and non-living, andhuman and nonhuman,which I call ‘ecologies ofdeath’.By reading select contemporary eco-artworksand philosophical andscientific accounts ondeath in a more-than-human world through oneanother, this paper aimsto explore and queer theecologies and ontologiesof death in the un/common world of the Anthropocene.

AB - Paper presented at (Un)Common Worlds: Human-Animal Studies Conference, 7-9 August 2018, Turku, FI.Abstract:The ecological crises –often seen as a key component of the Anthropocene – render certainhabitats unliveable, leading to the death of individuals and populations.While some indicate thatthe notion of the Anthropocene reinforces thehegemonic position andexceptionalism of thehuman subject, it alsobecomes evident that, inthis context, the storiesof species extinction andnonhuman death are profoundly entangled withthe histories of colonialviolence and eliminationof the non-normative human other.Whilst bioscience emphasises interdependency, commonality andrelationality as crucialcharacteristics of lifeshared by all organisms,Western cultural imaginaries tend to draw athick dividing line between human and nonhuman animals, particularlyevident in the contextof death. On the onehand, death appears asa process common to allforms of life; on the other,as an event that distinguishes human from other organisms. This splitis paralleled by a dualistic approach to the human corpse itself: ‘dead’matter is predominantlyframed by either the secularized discourse on thesanctity and uniquenessof the dead body, or thenarratives on its ‘abject’character.There is a lack of sufficient theorising of themessy intimacies between materialities ofhuman and nonhumankind that form part ofthe processes of deathand dying. Our culturalunderstandings requirenarratives attentive torelationalities and entanglements of the living and non-living, andhuman and nonhuman,which I call ‘ecologies ofdeath’.By reading select contemporary eco-artworksand philosophical andscientific accounts ondeath in a more-than-human world through oneanother, this paper aimsto explore and queer theecologies and ontologiesof death in the un/common world of the Anthropocene.

KW - 6160 Other humanities

KW - Queer Death Studies

KW - Queer Ecologies

KW - Animal Studies

KW - Bioart

KW - Feminist Philosophy

M3 - Conference contribution

BT - (Un)Common Worlds

ER -

Radomska MI. Queering Un/Common Ecologies of Death. julkaisussa (Un)Common Worlds. 2018