Reliance on model-based and model-free control in obesity

Lieneke K Janssen, Florian Mahner, Florian Schlagenhauf, Lorenz Deserno, Annette Horstmann

Tutkimustuotos: TyöpaperiTieteellinen

Kuvaus

Consuming more energy than is expended may reflect a failure of control over eatingbehaviour in obesity. Behavioural control arises from a balance between two dissociablestrategies of reinforcement learning: model-free and model-based. We hypothesized thatweight status relates to an imbalance in reliance on model-based and model-free control,and that it may do so in a linear or quadratic manner. To test this, 90 healthy participants in awide BMI range (normal-weight (n=31), overweight (n=29), obese (n=30)) performed asequential decision-making task. The primary analysis indicated that obese participantsrelied less on model-based control than overweight and normal-weight participants, with nodifference between overweight and normal-weight participants. In line, secondary continuousanalyses revealed a negative linear, but not quadratic, relationship between BMI and model-based control. Computational modelling of choice behaviour suggested that a mixture of bothstrategies was shifted towards less model-based control in obese participants. Furthermore,exploratory analyses of separate weights for model-free and model-based control showedstronger reliance on model-free control with increased BMI. Our findings suggest that obesity may indeed be related to an imbalance in behavioural control as expressed in a phenotype of less model-based control potentially resulting from enhanced reliance on model-free computations.
Consuming more energy than is expended may reflect a failure of control over eatingbehaviour in obesity. Behavioural control arises from a balance between two dissociablestrategies of reinforcement learning: model-free and model-based. We hypothesized thatweight status relates to an imbalance in reliance on model-based and model-free control,and that it may do so in a linear or quadratic manner. To test this, 90 healthy participants in awide BMI range (normal-weight (n=31), overweight (n=29), obese (n=30)) performed asequential decision-making task. The primary analysis indicated that obese participantsrelied less on model-based control than overweight and normal-weight participants, with nodifference between overweight and normal-weight participants. In line, secondary continuousanalyses revealed a negative linear, but not quadratic, relationship between BMI and model-based control. Computational modelling of choice behaviour suggested that a mixture of bothstrategies was shifted towards less model-based control in obese participants. Furthermore,exploratory analyses of separate weights for model-free and model-based control showedstronger reliance on model-free control with increased BMI. Our findings suggest that obesity may indeed be related to an imbalance in behavioural control as expressed in a phenotype of less model-based control potentially resulting from enhanced reliance on model-free computations.
Alkuperäiskielienglanti
Julkaisupaikkapsyarxiv
KustantajaOpen Society Foundations (OSF)
DOI - pysyväislinkit
TilaJulkaistu - 17 heinäkuuta 2019
OKM-julkaisutyyppiD4 Julkaistu kehittämis- tai tutkimusraportti taikka -selvitys

Lainaa tätä

Janssen, L. K., Mahner, F., Schlagenhauf, F., Deserno, L., & Horstmann, A. (2019). Reliance on model-based and model-free control in obesity. psyarxiv: Open Society Foundations (OSF). https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/6s47t
Janssen, Lieneke K ; Mahner, Florian ; Schlagenhauf, Florian ; Deserno, Lorenz ; Horstmann, Annette. / Reliance on model-based and model-free control in obesity. psyarxiv : Open Society Foundations (OSF), 2019.
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abstract = "Consuming more energy than is expended may reflect a failure of control over eatingbehaviour in obesity. Behavioural control arises from a balance between two dissociablestrategies of reinforcement learning: model-free and model-based. We hypothesized thatweight status relates to an imbalance in reliance on model-based and model-free control,and that it may do so in a linear or quadratic manner. To test this, 90 healthy participants in awide BMI range (normal-weight (n=31), overweight (n=29), obese (n=30)) performed asequential decision-making task. The primary analysis indicated that obese participantsrelied less on model-based control than overweight and normal-weight participants, with nodifference between overweight and normal-weight participants. In line, secondary continuousanalyses revealed a negative linear, but not quadratic, relationship between BMI and model-based control. Computational modelling of choice behaviour suggested that a mixture of bothstrategies was shifted towards less model-based control in obese participants. Furthermore,exploratory analyses of separate weights for model-free and model-based control showedstronger reliance on model-free control with increased BMI. Our findings suggest that obesity may indeed be related to an imbalance in behavioural control as expressed in a phenotype of less model-based control potentially resulting from enhanced reliance on model-free computations.",
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Janssen, LK, Mahner, F, Schlagenhauf, F, Deserno, L & Horstmann, A 2019 'Reliance on model-based and model-free control in obesity' Open Society Foundations (OSF), psyarxiv. https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/6s47t

Reliance on model-based and model-free control in obesity. / Janssen, Lieneke K; Mahner, Florian; Schlagenhauf, Florian; Deserno, Lorenz; Horstmann, Annette.

psyarxiv : Open Society Foundations (OSF), 2019.

Tutkimustuotos: TyöpaperiTieteellinen

TY - UNPB

T1 - Reliance on model-based and model-free control in obesity

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N2 - Consuming more energy than is expended may reflect a failure of control over eatingbehaviour in obesity. Behavioural control arises from a balance between two dissociablestrategies of reinforcement learning: model-free and model-based. We hypothesized thatweight status relates to an imbalance in reliance on model-based and model-free control,and that it may do so in a linear or quadratic manner. To test this, 90 healthy participants in awide BMI range (normal-weight (n=31), overweight (n=29), obese (n=30)) performed asequential decision-making task. The primary analysis indicated that obese participantsrelied less on model-based control than overweight and normal-weight participants, with nodifference between overweight and normal-weight participants. In line, secondary continuousanalyses revealed a negative linear, but not quadratic, relationship between BMI and model-based control. Computational modelling of choice behaviour suggested that a mixture of bothstrategies was shifted towards less model-based control in obese participants. Furthermore,exploratory analyses of separate weights for model-free and model-based control showedstronger reliance on model-free control with increased BMI. Our findings suggest that obesity may indeed be related to an imbalance in behavioural control as expressed in a phenotype of less model-based control potentially resulting from enhanced reliance on model-free computations.

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Janssen LK, Mahner F, Schlagenhauf F, Deserno L, Horstmann A. Reliance on model-based and model-free control in obesity. psyarxiv: Open Society Foundations (OSF). 2019 heinä 17. https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/6s47t