Reorganizing Biomedical Research: Biobanks as Conditions of Possibility for Personalized Medicine

Tutkimustuotos: OpinnäyteVäitöskirjaMonografia

Kuvaus

In recent decades biomedical samples and data have been organized into large depositories such as biobanks. These biobanks have also been founded in Finland to allow for increasingly large-scale, international, and data-intensive biomedical research. Simultaneously expectations of personalized medicine have increased – in the future individuals instead of averages will be treated, and genomic data may be utilized in the clinics or in disease prevention. This study – rooted in science and technology studies, and linking to discussions of the role of expectations and imaginaries – examines biobanks as conditions of possibility for personalized medicine to become reality: that is, how biobanks are expected to make personalized medicine possible. The rearranging of biomedical research through biobanks is investigated against the backdrop of personalized medicine as a sociotechnical imaginary: a vision of a desirable future, which is both built on, and continuously requires, science and technology, and therefore societal efforts, for its fulfillment (Jasanoff and Kim, 2015). Consequently, this study asks: What do the expectations related to biobanks as conditions of possibility for personalized medicine tell us about the knowledge production in which biobanks are supposed to participate, and the role biobanks play in it? To answer this question, biobanking is studied through three different lenses. The analytical sections unpack, first, the claims of high quality samples they store; second, the ideas related to research population(s) seen to be stored in biobanks; and third, their link to the expectations of translational medicine. Thus, it is explored how biobanks are expected and said to contribute to contemporary biomedical knowledge production that takes place in highly regulated settings. The main argument of the study is that the very idea of biobanks is being reshaped as operations, conventions, regulatory frameworks, and new expectations are linked to the imaginary of personalized medicine and require that action be taken. The different layers of stakeholders, regulations, developments, and projects that condition and constrain biobanking and hence knowledge production, have, and continue to have, an effect on what biobanks are considered and understood to be, and the kind of knowledge and scientific practices they could foster. The analytical chapters illustrate the multiplicity of tendencies and linkages attendant on biobanks as they begin to reorganize biomedical research.
Alkuperäiskielienglanti
Myöntävä instituutio
  • Helsingin yliopisto
Valvoja/neuvonantaja
  • Helén, Ilpo, Valvoja, Ulkoinen henkilö
  • Snell, Karoliina, Valvoja
Myöntöpäivämäärä27 huhtikuuta 2019
JulkaisupaikkaHelsinki
Kustantaja
Painoksen ISBN978-951-51-3383-0
Sähköinen ISBN978-951-51-3384-7
TilaJulkaistu - 17 huhtikuuta 2019
OKM-julkaisutyyppiG4 Tohtorinväitöskirja (monografia)

Tieteenalat

  • 5141 Sosiologia
  • Tieteen ja teknologian tutkimus

Lainaa tätä

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title = "Reorganizing Biomedical Research: Biobanks as Conditions of Possibility for Personalized Medicine",
abstract = "In recent decades biomedical samples and data have been organized into large depositories such as biobanks. These biobanks have also been founded in Finland to allow for increasingly large-scale, international, and data-intensive biomedical research. Simultaneously expectations of personalized medicine have increased – in the future individuals instead of averages will be treated, and genomic data may be utilized in the clinics or in disease prevention. This study – rooted in science and technology studies, and linking to discussions of the role of expectations and imaginaries – examines biobanks as conditions of possibility for personalized medicine to become reality: that is, how biobanks are expected to make personalized medicine possible. The rearranging of biomedical research through biobanks is investigated against the backdrop of personalized medicine as a sociotechnical imaginary: a vision of a desirable future, which is both built on, and continuously requires, science and technology, and therefore societal efforts, for its fulfillment (Jasanoff and Kim, 2015). Consequently, this study asks: What do the expectations related to biobanks as conditions of possibility for personalized medicine tell us about the knowledge production in which biobanks are supposed to participate, and the role biobanks play in it? To answer this question, biobanking is studied through three different lenses. The analytical sections unpack, first, the claims of high quality samples they store; second, the ideas related to research population(s) seen to be stored in biobanks; and third, their link to the expectations of translational medicine. Thus, it is explored how biobanks are expected and said to contribute to contemporary biomedical knowledge production that takes place in highly regulated settings. The main argument of the study is that the very idea of biobanks is being reshaped as operations, conventions, regulatory frameworks, and new expectations are linked to the imaginary of personalized medicine and require that action be taken. The different layers of stakeholders, regulations, developments, and projects that condition and constrain biobanking and hence knowledge production, have, and continue to have, an effect on what biobanks are considered and understood to be, and the kind of knowledge and scientific practices they could foster. The analytical chapters illustrate the multiplicity of tendencies and linkages attendant on biobanks as they begin to reorganize biomedical research.",
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Reorganizing Biomedical Research : Biobanks as Conditions of Possibility for Personalized Medicine. / Tarkkala, Heta Anna Ulrika.

Helsinki : University of Helsinki, 2019. 162 s.

Tutkimustuotos: OpinnäyteVäitöskirjaMonografia

TY - THES

T1 - Reorganizing Biomedical Research

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AU - Tarkkala, Heta Anna Ulrika

PY - 2019/4/17

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N2 - In recent decades biomedical samples and data have been organized into large depositories such as biobanks. These biobanks have also been founded in Finland to allow for increasingly large-scale, international, and data-intensive biomedical research. Simultaneously expectations of personalized medicine have increased – in the future individuals instead of averages will be treated, and genomic data may be utilized in the clinics or in disease prevention. This study – rooted in science and technology studies, and linking to discussions of the role of expectations and imaginaries – examines biobanks as conditions of possibility for personalized medicine to become reality: that is, how biobanks are expected to make personalized medicine possible. The rearranging of biomedical research through biobanks is investigated against the backdrop of personalized medicine as a sociotechnical imaginary: a vision of a desirable future, which is both built on, and continuously requires, science and technology, and therefore societal efforts, for its fulfillment (Jasanoff and Kim, 2015). Consequently, this study asks: What do the expectations related to biobanks as conditions of possibility for personalized medicine tell us about the knowledge production in which biobanks are supposed to participate, and the role biobanks play in it? To answer this question, biobanking is studied through three different lenses. The analytical sections unpack, first, the claims of high quality samples they store; second, the ideas related to research population(s) seen to be stored in biobanks; and third, their link to the expectations of translational medicine. Thus, it is explored how biobanks are expected and said to contribute to contemporary biomedical knowledge production that takes place in highly regulated settings. The main argument of the study is that the very idea of biobanks is being reshaped as operations, conventions, regulatory frameworks, and new expectations are linked to the imaginary of personalized medicine and require that action be taken. The different layers of stakeholders, regulations, developments, and projects that condition and constrain biobanking and hence knowledge production, have, and continue to have, an effect on what biobanks are considered and understood to be, and the kind of knowledge and scientific practices they could foster. The analytical chapters illustrate the multiplicity of tendencies and linkages attendant on biobanks as they begin to reorganize biomedical research.

AB - In recent decades biomedical samples and data have been organized into large depositories such as biobanks. These biobanks have also been founded in Finland to allow for increasingly large-scale, international, and data-intensive biomedical research. Simultaneously expectations of personalized medicine have increased – in the future individuals instead of averages will be treated, and genomic data may be utilized in the clinics or in disease prevention. This study – rooted in science and technology studies, and linking to discussions of the role of expectations and imaginaries – examines biobanks as conditions of possibility for personalized medicine to become reality: that is, how biobanks are expected to make personalized medicine possible. The rearranging of biomedical research through biobanks is investigated against the backdrop of personalized medicine as a sociotechnical imaginary: a vision of a desirable future, which is both built on, and continuously requires, science and technology, and therefore societal efforts, for its fulfillment (Jasanoff and Kim, 2015). Consequently, this study asks: What do the expectations related to biobanks as conditions of possibility for personalized medicine tell us about the knowledge production in which biobanks are supposed to participate, and the role biobanks play in it? To answer this question, biobanking is studied through three different lenses. The analytical sections unpack, first, the claims of high quality samples they store; second, the ideas related to research population(s) seen to be stored in biobanks; and third, their link to the expectations of translational medicine. Thus, it is explored how biobanks are expected and said to contribute to contemporary biomedical knowledge production that takes place in highly regulated settings. The main argument of the study is that the very idea of biobanks is being reshaped as operations, conventions, regulatory frameworks, and new expectations are linked to the imaginary of personalized medicine and require that action be taken. The different layers of stakeholders, regulations, developments, and projects that condition and constrain biobanking and hence knowledge production, have, and continue to have, an effect on what biobanks are considered and understood to be, and the kind of knowledge and scientific practices they could foster. The analytical chapters illustrate the multiplicity of tendencies and linkages attendant on biobanks as they begin to reorganize biomedical research.

KW - 5141 Sociology

KW - Tieteen ja teknologian tutkimus

M3 - Doctoral Thesis

SN - 978-951-51-3383-0

T3 - Publications of the Faculty of Social Sciences

PB - University of Helsinki

CY - Helsinki

ER -

Tarkkala HAU. Reorganizing Biomedical Research: Biobanks as Conditions of Possibility for Personalized Medicine. Helsinki: University of Helsinki, 2019. 162 s. (Publications of the Faculty of Social Sciences; 114).