Songcrafting practice: A teacher inquiry into the potential to support collaborative creation and creative agency within school music education

Julkaisun otsikon käännös: Sävellyttäminen:Yhteisluominen ja luovan toiminnan tukeminen koulun musiikkikasvatuksessa - tutkivan opettajan näkökulma

Tutkimustuotos: OpinnäyteVäitöskirja

Kuvaus

This inquiry has had the theoretical aim of theorizing and analyzing educational action and creating conceptualizations as well as cumulating theoretical knowledge of collaborative creation and creative agency within music education. It has also had the empirical task of describing and analyzing educational action through examining the question of What are the potential meanings of experiencing collaborative creation and creative agency within school music education. This question was approached for it has been argued that although creative agency is emphasized in curricular texts and new views on learning, music education in schools in many countries, including Finland, does not sufficiently support its development. In order to discuss the potential to support collaborative creation and creative agency within school music education this research report provides an overview of a teacher inquiry into the practice of songcrafting, situated in a Finnish primary school context, reported in three peer-reviewed internationally published journal articles included in this research report. In this inquiry, collaborative composition practice of songs, songcrafting, has been seen as a 'case' of one potential way to support students' creative agency through tactful facilitation by the teacher. Through philosophical analysis and analysis of the teacher-researcher (see Stenhouse, 1975; Cochran-Smith & Lytle, 2009) and student perspectives, the inquiry examined the potential of supporting collaborative creation and creative agency within school music education and the teacher's position within it. The data included one teacher's reflections on songcrafting practice during the years 1997–2004 and forty-one students’ experiences of songcrafting recalled several years afterwards during semi-structured interviews (Kvale & Brinkman, 2009) which were analyzed using qualitative methods, classifying (Boeije, 2010) and working narratively with the data (Riessman, 2008). The results of the three articles concerned 1) the meanings of grasping onto and exploring student initiatives both in terms of collaborative composing and the collaborative creation of meaningful teaching-learning practices (Article 1); 2) the meanings of a teacher learning at work through long-term reflection-on-practice (Article 2); and 3) the meanings of examining students' experiences of teaching-learning practices (Article 3). These three led to the discussion of 1) creative agency and democratic learning communities; 2) creative agency and transforming practice; and 3) creative agency and composing with regards to both teacher and student agency. Based on the results of this inquiry, it is argued that in order to support collaborative creation and creative agency within school music education, it is crucial to ponder the overall practices and views of learning, rather than merely implementing separate creative tasks. This necessitates the creation of an inquiring learning atmosphere, which is open to new possibilities and acknowledges the crucial role of social processes in collaborative creativity. Inquiry as stance is argued to be essential for a teacher and her group of learners in changing situations and rapidly developing society. Furthermore, all participants in a learning community might be seen as prospective contributors to create meaningful learning practices. Due to the evaluation of the results of this inquiry, it is proposed that collaborative composing sometimes requires the educator to actively advance student learning, rather than only leave them alone to experiment. Furthermore, the position of the teacher needs to be adjusted situationally. Adopting a facilitative stance may involve for instance tactful emotional and social scaffolding and co-composing. This inquiry claims that a variety of experiences with creative collaboration and composing alone and in groups is necessary since the early years and throughout the whole school music education to support the students experience of creative agency. The analysis of the students' experiences concerning songcrafting revealed the varied nuances of their experiences, and highlights the meaning of examining students experiences to further teaching-learning practices. Teaching-learning practices need to be examined and reflected and inquiry as stance is argued to be an essential approach for a teacher and her group of learners to cope well in changing situations and rapidly developing society. In order to support students' creative agency within composition, it is necessary to view all students as capable music creators and composers. Furthermore, describing everyone as capable and providing possibilities to experience creative processes even as peripheral participants supports the learners' beliefs in their musical creative capabilities. The seemingly democratic stance whereby students are allowed to choose their level of participation is also discussed critically, because the inquiry found that it did not automatically lead students take the stance of a creative musical agent. Based on the analysis, the meaning of collaborative musical works, 'oeuvres', that are shared and stored are claimed to strengthen the musical community. It is proposed that documented 'oeuvres' also enable recalling, reflection and following advancement, and could be used systematically within music education. Through the case of songcrafting the possibility of viewing all participants in a learning community as prospective contributors who create meaningful learning practices is discussed. This requires the creation of a learning atmosphere that promotes inquiry, is open to new possibilities, and acknowledges the crucial role of social processes in collaborative creativity. Based upon the results of this inquiry, it is argued that allowing space for situation-originated initiatives and collaborative inquiry, and skillfully weaving these together with the aims of the curricula, creates potentially meaningful teaching-learning situations that support both teacher and student creative agency. Creative collaboration and creative agency is important also with regards to curriculum reforms and curriculum development. If the curriculum becomes a collaborative creation, a collaborative work 'oeuvre' with its creators' efforts negotiated and visible within it, the engagement in its implementation becomes more feasible. As showed though the case of songcrafting, the collaborative oeuvre mostly enforced participation and engagement. However, if the collaborative creation process is too loose, it may lead to differentiation in songcrafting as in curriculum: it's the others creation, and the others' matter in which I do not belong. At best also curricula can be a collaborative 'oeuvre' to which to engage with, and from which different meanings inevitably arise as in songcrafting.
Alkuperäiskielienglanti
JulkaisupaikkaHelsinki
Kustantaja
Painoksen ISBN978-952-329-023-5
Sähköinen ISBN978-952-329-024-2
TilaJulkaistu - 19 helmikuuta 2016
OKM-julkaisutyyppiG5 Tohtorinväitöskirja (artikkeli)

Tieteenalat

  • 516 Kasvatustieteet
  • 6131 Teatteri, tanssi, musiikki, muut esittävät taiteet

Lainaa tätä

@phdthesis{e399f05867fa4089952c923b9bcf0531,
title = "Songcrafting practice: A teacher inquiry into the potential to support collaborative creation and creative agency within school music education",
abstract = "This inquiry has had the theoretical aim of theorizing and analyzing educational action and creating conceptualizations as well as cumulating theoretical knowledge of collaborative creation and creative agency within music education. It has also had the empirical task of describing and analyzing educational action through examining the question of What are the potential meanings of experiencing collaborative creation and creative agency within school music education. This question was approached for it has been argued that although creative agency is emphasized in curricular texts and new views on learning, music education in schools in many countries, including Finland, does not sufficiently support its development. In order to discuss the potential to support collaborative creation and creative agency within school music education this research report provides an overview of a teacher inquiry into the practice of songcrafting, situated in a Finnish primary school context, reported in three peer-reviewed internationally published journal articles included in this research report. In this inquiry, collaborative composition practice of songs, songcrafting, has been seen as a 'case' of one potential way to support students' creative agency through tactful facilitation by the teacher. Through philosophical analysis and analysis of the teacher-researcher (see Stenhouse, 1975; Cochran-Smith & Lytle, 2009) and student perspectives, the inquiry examined the potential of supporting collaborative creation and creative agency within school music education and the teacher's position within it. The data included one teacher's reflections on songcrafting practice during the years 1997–2004 and forty-one students’ experiences of songcrafting recalled several years afterwards during semi-structured interviews (Kvale & Brinkman, 2009) which were analyzed using qualitative methods, classifying (Boeije, 2010) and working narratively with the data (Riessman, 2008). The results of the three articles concerned 1) the meanings of grasping onto and exploring student initiatives both in terms of collaborative composing and the collaborative creation of meaningful teaching-learning practices (Article 1); 2) the meanings of a teacher learning at work through long-term reflection-on-practice (Article 2); and 3) the meanings of examining students' experiences of teaching-learning practices (Article 3). These three led to the discussion of 1) creative agency and democratic learning communities; 2) creative agency and transforming practice; and 3) creative agency and composing with regards to both teacher and student agency. Based on the results of this inquiry, it is argued that in order to support collaborative creation and creative agency within school music education, it is crucial to ponder the overall practices and views of learning, rather than merely implementing separate creative tasks. This necessitates the creation of an inquiring learning atmosphere, which is open to new possibilities and acknowledges the crucial role of social processes in collaborative creativity. Inquiry as stance is argued to be essential for a teacher and her group of learners in changing situations and rapidly developing society. Furthermore, all participants in a learning community might be seen as prospective contributors to create meaningful learning practices. Due to the evaluation of the results of this inquiry, it is proposed that collaborative composing sometimes requires the educator to actively advance student learning, rather than only leave them alone to experiment. Furthermore, the position of the teacher needs to be adjusted situationally. Adopting a facilitative stance may involve for instance tactful emotional and social scaffolding and co-composing. This inquiry claims that a variety of experiences with creative collaboration and composing alone and in groups is necessary since the early years and throughout the whole school music education to support the students experience of creative agency. The analysis of the students' experiences concerning songcrafting revealed the varied nuances of their experiences, and highlights the meaning of examining students experiences to further teaching-learning practices. Teaching-learning practices need to be examined and reflected and inquiry as stance is argued to be an essential approach for a teacher and her group of learners to cope well in changing situations and rapidly developing society. In order to support students' creative agency within composition, it is necessary to view all students as capable music creators and composers. Furthermore, describing everyone as capable and providing possibilities to experience creative processes even as peripheral participants supports the learners' beliefs in their musical creative capabilities. The seemingly democratic stance whereby students are allowed to choose their level of participation is also discussed critically, because the inquiry found that it did not automatically lead students take the stance of a creative musical agent. Based on the analysis, the meaning of collaborative musical works, 'oeuvres', that are shared and stored are claimed to strengthen the musical community. It is proposed that documented 'oeuvres' also enable recalling, reflection and following advancement, and could be used systematically within music education. Through the case of songcrafting the possibility of viewing all participants in a learning community as prospective contributors who create meaningful learning practices is discussed. This requires the creation of a learning atmosphere that promotes inquiry, is open to new possibilities, and acknowledges the crucial role of social processes in collaborative creativity. Based upon the results of this inquiry, it is argued that allowing space for situation-originated initiatives and collaborative inquiry, and skillfully weaving these together with the aims of the curricula, creates potentially meaningful teaching-learning situations that support both teacher and student creative agency. Creative collaboration and creative agency is important also with regards to curriculum reforms and curriculum development. If the curriculum becomes a collaborative creation, a collaborative work 'oeuvre' with its creators' efforts negotiated and visible within it, the engagement in its implementation becomes more feasible. As showed though the case of songcrafting, the collaborative oeuvre mostly enforced participation and engagement. However, if the collaborative creation process is too loose, it may lead to differentiation in songcrafting as in curriculum: it's the others creation, and the others' matter in which I do not belong. At best also curricula can be a collaborative 'oeuvre' to which to engage with, and from which different meanings inevitably arise as in songcrafting.",
keywords = "516 Educational sciences, 6131 Theatre, dance, music, other performing arts",
author = "Sari Muhonen",
year = "2016",
month = "2",
day = "19",
language = "English",
isbn = "978-952-329-023-5",
publisher = "Taideyliopiston Sibelius-akatemia",
address = "Finland",

}

Songcrafting practice : A teacher inquiry into the potential to support collaborative creation and creative agency within school music education. / Muhonen, Sari.

Helsinki : Taideyliopiston Sibelius-akatemia, 2016. 234 s.

Tutkimustuotos: OpinnäyteVäitöskirja

TY - THES

T1 - Songcrafting practice

T2 - A teacher inquiry into the potential to support collaborative creation and creative agency within school music education

AU - Muhonen, Sari

PY - 2016/2/19

Y1 - 2016/2/19

N2 - This inquiry has had the theoretical aim of theorizing and analyzing educational action and creating conceptualizations as well as cumulating theoretical knowledge of collaborative creation and creative agency within music education. It has also had the empirical task of describing and analyzing educational action through examining the question of What are the potential meanings of experiencing collaborative creation and creative agency within school music education. This question was approached for it has been argued that although creative agency is emphasized in curricular texts and new views on learning, music education in schools in many countries, including Finland, does not sufficiently support its development. In order to discuss the potential to support collaborative creation and creative agency within school music education this research report provides an overview of a teacher inquiry into the practice of songcrafting, situated in a Finnish primary school context, reported in three peer-reviewed internationally published journal articles included in this research report. In this inquiry, collaborative composition practice of songs, songcrafting, has been seen as a 'case' of one potential way to support students' creative agency through tactful facilitation by the teacher. Through philosophical analysis and analysis of the teacher-researcher (see Stenhouse, 1975; Cochran-Smith & Lytle, 2009) and student perspectives, the inquiry examined the potential of supporting collaborative creation and creative agency within school music education and the teacher's position within it. The data included one teacher's reflections on songcrafting practice during the years 1997–2004 and forty-one students’ experiences of songcrafting recalled several years afterwards during semi-structured interviews (Kvale & Brinkman, 2009) which were analyzed using qualitative methods, classifying (Boeije, 2010) and working narratively with the data (Riessman, 2008). The results of the three articles concerned 1) the meanings of grasping onto and exploring student initiatives both in terms of collaborative composing and the collaborative creation of meaningful teaching-learning practices (Article 1); 2) the meanings of a teacher learning at work through long-term reflection-on-practice (Article 2); and 3) the meanings of examining students' experiences of teaching-learning practices (Article 3). These three led to the discussion of 1) creative agency and democratic learning communities; 2) creative agency and transforming practice; and 3) creative agency and composing with regards to both teacher and student agency. Based on the results of this inquiry, it is argued that in order to support collaborative creation and creative agency within school music education, it is crucial to ponder the overall practices and views of learning, rather than merely implementing separate creative tasks. This necessitates the creation of an inquiring learning atmosphere, which is open to new possibilities and acknowledges the crucial role of social processes in collaborative creativity. Inquiry as stance is argued to be essential for a teacher and her group of learners in changing situations and rapidly developing society. Furthermore, all participants in a learning community might be seen as prospective contributors to create meaningful learning practices. Due to the evaluation of the results of this inquiry, it is proposed that collaborative composing sometimes requires the educator to actively advance student learning, rather than only leave them alone to experiment. Furthermore, the position of the teacher needs to be adjusted situationally. Adopting a facilitative stance may involve for instance tactful emotional and social scaffolding and co-composing. This inquiry claims that a variety of experiences with creative collaboration and composing alone and in groups is necessary since the early years and throughout the whole school music education to support the students experience of creative agency. The analysis of the students' experiences concerning songcrafting revealed the varied nuances of their experiences, and highlights the meaning of examining students experiences to further teaching-learning practices. Teaching-learning practices need to be examined and reflected and inquiry as stance is argued to be an essential approach for a teacher and her group of learners to cope well in changing situations and rapidly developing society. In order to support students' creative agency within composition, it is necessary to view all students as capable music creators and composers. Furthermore, describing everyone as capable and providing possibilities to experience creative processes even as peripheral participants supports the learners' beliefs in their musical creative capabilities. The seemingly democratic stance whereby students are allowed to choose their level of participation is also discussed critically, because the inquiry found that it did not automatically lead students take the stance of a creative musical agent. Based on the analysis, the meaning of collaborative musical works, 'oeuvres', that are shared and stored are claimed to strengthen the musical community. It is proposed that documented 'oeuvres' also enable recalling, reflection and following advancement, and could be used systematically within music education. Through the case of songcrafting the possibility of viewing all participants in a learning community as prospective contributors who create meaningful learning practices is discussed. This requires the creation of a learning atmosphere that promotes inquiry, is open to new possibilities, and acknowledges the crucial role of social processes in collaborative creativity. Based upon the results of this inquiry, it is argued that allowing space for situation-originated initiatives and collaborative inquiry, and skillfully weaving these together with the aims of the curricula, creates potentially meaningful teaching-learning situations that support both teacher and student creative agency. Creative collaboration and creative agency is important also with regards to curriculum reforms and curriculum development. If the curriculum becomes a collaborative creation, a collaborative work 'oeuvre' with its creators' efforts negotiated and visible within it, the engagement in its implementation becomes more feasible. As showed though the case of songcrafting, the collaborative oeuvre mostly enforced participation and engagement. However, if the collaborative creation process is too loose, it may lead to differentiation in songcrafting as in curriculum: it's the others creation, and the others' matter in which I do not belong. At best also curricula can be a collaborative 'oeuvre' to which to engage with, and from which different meanings inevitably arise as in songcrafting.

AB - This inquiry has had the theoretical aim of theorizing and analyzing educational action and creating conceptualizations as well as cumulating theoretical knowledge of collaborative creation and creative agency within music education. It has also had the empirical task of describing and analyzing educational action through examining the question of What are the potential meanings of experiencing collaborative creation and creative agency within school music education. This question was approached for it has been argued that although creative agency is emphasized in curricular texts and new views on learning, music education in schools in many countries, including Finland, does not sufficiently support its development. In order to discuss the potential to support collaborative creation and creative agency within school music education this research report provides an overview of a teacher inquiry into the practice of songcrafting, situated in a Finnish primary school context, reported in three peer-reviewed internationally published journal articles included in this research report. In this inquiry, collaborative composition practice of songs, songcrafting, has been seen as a 'case' of one potential way to support students' creative agency through tactful facilitation by the teacher. Through philosophical analysis and analysis of the teacher-researcher (see Stenhouse, 1975; Cochran-Smith & Lytle, 2009) and student perspectives, the inquiry examined the potential of supporting collaborative creation and creative agency within school music education and the teacher's position within it. The data included one teacher's reflections on songcrafting practice during the years 1997–2004 and forty-one students’ experiences of songcrafting recalled several years afterwards during semi-structured interviews (Kvale & Brinkman, 2009) which were analyzed using qualitative methods, classifying (Boeije, 2010) and working narratively with the data (Riessman, 2008). The results of the three articles concerned 1) the meanings of grasping onto and exploring student initiatives both in terms of collaborative composing and the collaborative creation of meaningful teaching-learning practices (Article 1); 2) the meanings of a teacher learning at work through long-term reflection-on-practice (Article 2); and 3) the meanings of examining students' experiences of teaching-learning practices (Article 3). These three led to the discussion of 1) creative agency and democratic learning communities; 2) creative agency and transforming practice; and 3) creative agency and composing with regards to both teacher and student agency. Based on the results of this inquiry, it is argued that in order to support collaborative creation and creative agency within school music education, it is crucial to ponder the overall practices and views of learning, rather than merely implementing separate creative tasks. This necessitates the creation of an inquiring learning atmosphere, which is open to new possibilities and acknowledges the crucial role of social processes in collaborative creativity. Inquiry as stance is argued to be essential for a teacher and her group of learners in changing situations and rapidly developing society. Furthermore, all participants in a learning community might be seen as prospective contributors to create meaningful learning practices. Due to the evaluation of the results of this inquiry, it is proposed that collaborative composing sometimes requires the educator to actively advance student learning, rather than only leave them alone to experiment. Furthermore, the position of the teacher needs to be adjusted situationally. Adopting a facilitative stance may involve for instance tactful emotional and social scaffolding and co-composing. This inquiry claims that a variety of experiences with creative collaboration and composing alone and in groups is necessary since the early years and throughout the whole school music education to support the students experience of creative agency. The analysis of the students' experiences concerning songcrafting revealed the varied nuances of their experiences, and highlights the meaning of examining students experiences to further teaching-learning practices. Teaching-learning practices need to be examined and reflected and inquiry as stance is argued to be an essential approach for a teacher and her group of learners to cope well in changing situations and rapidly developing society. In order to support students' creative agency within composition, it is necessary to view all students as capable music creators and composers. Furthermore, describing everyone as capable and providing possibilities to experience creative processes even as peripheral participants supports the learners' beliefs in their musical creative capabilities. The seemingly democratic stance whereby students are allowed to choose their level of participation is also discussed critically, because the inquiry found that it did not automatically lead students take the stance of a creative musical agent. Based on the analysis, the meaning of collaborative musical works, 'oeuvres', that are shared and stored are claimed to strengthen the musical community. It is proposed that documented 'oeuvres' also enable recalling, reflection and following advancement, and could be used systematically within music education. Through the case of songcrafting the possibility of viewing all participants in a learning community as prospective contributors who create meaningful learning practices is discussed. This requires the creation of a learning atmosphere that promotes inquiry, is open to new possibilities, and acknowledges the crucial role of social processes in collaborative creativity. Based upon the results of this inquiry, it is argued that allowing space for situation-originated initiatives and collaborative inquiry, and skillfully weaving these together with the aims of the curricula, creates potentially meaningful teaching-learning situations that support both teacher and student creative agency. Creative collaboration and creative agency is important also with regards to curriculum reforms and curriculum development. If the curriculum becomes a collaborative creation, a collaborative work 'oeuvre' with its creators' efforts negotiated and visible within it, the engagement in its implementation becomes more feasible. As showed though the case of songcrafting, the collaborative oeuvre mostly enforced participation and engagement. However, if the collaborative creation process is too loose, it may lead to differentiation in songcrafting as in curriculum: it's the others creation, and the others' matter in which I do not belong. At best also curricula can be a collaborative 'oeuvre' to which to engage with, and from which different meanings inevitably arise as in songcrafting.

KW - 516 Educational sciences

KW - 6131 Theatre, dance, music, other performing arts

M3 - Doctoral Thesis

SN - 978-952-329-023-5

PB - Taideyliopiston Sibelius-akatemia

CY - Helsinki

ER -