The Doxa Motif in Paul: A Narrative Approach to the Vindication of the Glory of God through Christ

Tutkimustuotos: OpinnäyteVäitöskirja

Kuvaus

This dissertation explores the use and meaning of the doxa motif in undisputed Pauline literature. While doxa and its derivatives occur 72 times in undisputed letters and 96 times altogether inPauline literature, the doxa motif has not received sufficient attention in Pauline studies.

By examining Pauline doxa passages, the purpose of this research is to answer the following five questions:
(1) What are the most significant characters and events that are attached to the doxa motif in the Jewish Scriptures? Consequently, what kind of narrative substructure, if any, do they form?
(2) What are the characters and the events that are linked with doxa, and how do they relate to one another in Paul’s undisputed letters?
(3) How do the characters and the substructure of the Jewish Scriptures shape the logic of
argumentation in passages where Paul mentions doxa?
(4) How does Paul develop and redefine the narrative doxa motif in light of the Christ-event and the contemporary context, namely in the midst of the imperial cult that he is facing?
(5) How does Paul want his audience, Jews and Gentiles alike, to identify with the narrative characters in the story?

While the first question provides a necessary background for my study, the last four questions guide my research. The purpose of this methodology is to strive for us to comprehend the use of doxa in Pauline thought in light of the larger sub-narrative and the characters in the narrative.

Using a narrative methodology, this study suggests that Paul inherited a meaning and a doxa narrative with characters from the Jewish Scriptures. While the Hebrew word that is most commonly translated doxa is kabod, twenty-nine other Hebrew words are also translated as doxa. Thus, the semantic range of doxa is not limited to honor, but also includes the following connotations: aesthetic beauty, riches and wealth, either figurative or literal majestic strength and weight, a visible manifestation, separateness and holiness, and a form and likeness. The major character attached to doxa is the intrinsic character of the doxa of the Lord, referring to his moral character of holiness, superiority over other gods, and visible manifestation. Additionally, the Lord grants, gives and crowns doxa to Adam (i.e. humanity), to Israel, to royal kings, and to the eschatological Servant. Moreover, there was an eschatological expectation of the vindication of the doxa of the Lord through the eschatological Servant.

This dissertation suggests that Paul inherited the aforementioned narrative characters and developed and refined them in light of the Christ-event. Paul redefined the doxa of God as the identity of God’s intrinsic and essential character of importance, highlighted in his divine presence, truth, immortality, honor, judgment, and sovereign grace. Furthermore, Paul considers Adam (i.e.
humanity) and Israel to be the representative of God’s derived doxa and image.
Paul wanted his audience, Jews and Gentiles alike, to identify with the fallen Adam and with Israel, i.e. those who do not display the doxa of God due to idolatry. Paul then identifies Christ both as the intrinsic doxa of God, who represents God and the derivative doxa of God, namely the second Adam, the royal king, and the eschatological Servant. Thus, the Christ-event, his death,
crucifixion and resurrection, inaugurates the vindication of doxa of God and the eschatological transformation of Adam (i.e. humanity), Israel, nations, and the entire creation. This change is not merely a return to humanity’s original image and glory, but a metamorphosis into Christ’s greater glory.

Finally, Paul urges his audience to identify, not with the doxa of his opponents or Caesar, but with the sufferings of the crucified and risen Christ, the doxa of God, in order to glorify God. In his ethical paraenesis, taking into consideration the eschatological hope of total transformation into the likeness of the doxa of Christ at his parousia, Paul encourages believers to identify with Christ, which results in their transformation into the eschatological humanity of Christ-likeness. This transformation encompasses the sexual relationship between male and female as a display of the doxa of Christ. In addition, the renewed believing community of Jews and Gentiles that considers others before themselves is another outworking of the transformation. These practices glorify God and are present expressions of the vindication of the doxa of God in the believing humanity that awaits the final transformation to the likeness of the derivative glory of Christ. This dissertation contends that the vindication of the doxa of God through Christ and the transformation of the believers into the likeness of the image and doxa of Christ is the narrative structure that undergirds Paul’s doxa motif.
Alkuperäiskielienglanti
Myöntävä instituutio
  • Helsingin yliopisto
Valvoja/neuvonantaja
  • Dunderberg, Ismo, Valvoja
  • Huttunen, Niko, Valvoja
Myöntöpäivämäärä12 kesäkuuta 2018
JulkaisupaikkaHelsinki
Kustantaja
Painoksen ISBN978-951-51-4253-5
Sähköinen ISBN978-951-51-4254-2
TilaJulkaistu - 2018
OKM-julkaisutyyppiG4 Tohtorinväitöskirja (monografia)

Tieteenalat

  • 614 Teologia
  • Uuden testamentin eksegetiikka
  • Uuden testamentin teologia
  • Paavali
  • kreikankieli (koine)

Lainaa tätä

@phdthesis{2c2fa461a0684e90bba3d3a295445466,
title = "The Doxa Motif in Paul: A Narrative Approach to the Vindication of the Glory of God through Christ",
abstract = "This dissertation explores the use and meaning of the doxa motif in undisputed Pauline literature. While doxa and its derivatives occur 72 times in undisputed letters and 96 times altogether inPauline literature, the doxa motif has not received sufficient attention in Pauline studies. By examining Pauline doxa passages, the purpose of this research is to answer the following five questions:(1) What are the most significant characters and events that are attached to the doxa motif in the Jewish Scriptures? Consequently, what kind of narrative substructure, if any, do they form?(2) What are the characters and the events that are linked with doxa, and how do they relate to one another in Paul’s undisputed letters?(3) How do the characters and the substructure of the Jewish Scriptures shape the logic ofargumentation in passages where Paul mentions doxa?(4) How does Paul develop and redefine the narrative doxa motif in light of the Christ-event and the contemporary context, namely in the midst of the imperial cult that he is facing?(5) How does Paul want his audience, Jews and Gentiles alike, to identify with the narrative characters in the story?While the first question provides a necessary background for my study, the last four questions guide my research. The purpose of this methodology is to strive for us to comprehend the use of doxa in Pauline thought in light of the larger sub-narrative and the characters in the narrative.Using a narrative methodology, this study suggests that Paul inherited a meaning and a doxa narrative with characters from the Jewish Scriptures. While the Hebrew word that is most commonly translated doxa is kabod, twenty-nine other Hebrew words are also translated as doxa. Thus, the semantic range of doxa is not limited to honor, but also includes the following connotations: aesthetic beauty, riches and wealth, either figurative or literal majestic strength and weight, a visible manifestation, separateness and holiness, and a form and likeness. The major character attached to doxa is the intrinsic character of the doxa of the Lord, referring to his moral character of holiness, superiority over other gods, and visible manifestation. Additionally, the Lord grants, gives and crowns doxa to Adam (i.e. humanity), to Israel, to royal kings, and to the eschatological Servant. Moreover, there was an eschatological expectation of the vindication of the doxa of the Lord through the eschatological Servant.This dissertation suggests that Paul inherited the aforementioned narrative characters and developed and refined them in light of the Christ-event. Paul redefined the doxa of God as the identity of God’s intrinsic and essential character of importance, highlighted in his divine presence, truth, immortality, honor, judgment, and sovereign grace. Furthermore, Paul considers Adam (i.e.humanity) and Israel to be the representative of God’s derived doxa and image.Paul wanted his audience, Jews and Gentiles alike, to identify with the fallen Adam and with Israel, i.e. those who do not display the doxa of God due to idolatry. Paul then identifies Christ both as the intrinsic doxa of God, who represents God and the derivative doxa of God, namely the second Adam, the royal king, and the eschatological Servant. Thus, the Christ-event, his death,crucifixion and resurrection, inaugurates the vindication of doxa of God and the eschatological transformation of Adam (i.e. humanity), Israel, nations, and the entire creation. This change is not merely a return to humanity’s original image and glory, but a metamorphosis into Christ’s greater glory.Finally, Paul urges his audience to identify, not with the doxa of his opponents or Caesar, but with the sufferings of the crucified and risen Christ, the doxa of God, in order to glorify God. In his ethical paraenesis, taking into consideration the eschatological hope of total transformation into the likeness of the doxa of Christ at his parousia, Paul encourages believers to identify with Christ, which results in their transformation into the eschatological humanity of Christ-likeness. This transformation encompasses the sexual relationship between male and female as a display of the doxa of Christ. In addition, the renewed believing community of Jews and Gentiles that considers others before themselves is another outworking of the transformation. These practices glorify God and are present expressions of the vindication of the doxa of God in the believing humanity that awaits the final transformation to the likeness of the derivative glory of Christ. This dissertation contends that the vindication of the doxa of God through Christ and the transformation of the believers into the likeness of the image and doxa of Christ is the narrative structure that undergirds Paul’s doxa motif.",
keywords = "614 Theology, Uuden testamentin eksegetiikka, Uuden testamentin teologia, Paavali, kreikankieli (koine)",
author = "Sivonen, {Mikko Santeri}",
year = "2018",
language = "English",
isbn = "978-951-51-4253-5",
publisher = "University of Helsinki",
address = "Finland",
school = "University of Helsinki",

}

The Doxa Motif in Paul : A Narrative Approach to the Vindication of the Glory of God through Christ. / Sivonen, Mikko Santeri.

Helsinki : University of Helsinki, 2018. 250 s.

Tutkimustuotos: OpinnäyteVäitöskirja

TY - THES

T1 - The Doxa Motif in Paul

T2 - A Narrative Approach to the Vindication of the Glory of God through Christ

AU - Sivonen, Mikko Santeri

PY - 2018

Y1 - 2018

N2 - This dissertation explores the use and meaning of the doxa motif in undisputed Pauline literature. While doxa and its derivatives occur 72 times in undisputed letters and 96 times altogether inPauline literature, the doxa motif has not received sufficient attention in Pauline studies. By examining Pauline doxa passages, the purpose of this research is to answer the following five questions:(1) What are the most significant characters and events that are attached to the doxa motif in the Jewish Scriptures? Consequently, what kind of narrative substructure, if any, do they form?(2) What are the characters and the events that are linked with doxa, and how do they relate to one another in Paul’s undisputed letters?(3) How do the characters and the substructure of the Jewish Scriptures shape the logic ofargumentation in passages where Paul mentions doxa?(4) How does Paul develop and redefine the narrative doxa motif in light of the Christ-event and the contemporary context, namely in the midst of the imperial cult that he is facing?(5) How does Paul want his audience, Jews and Gentiles alike, to identify with the narrative characters in the story?While the first question provides a necessary background for my study, the last four questions guide my research. The purpose of this methodology is to strive for us to comprehend the use of doxa in Pauline thought in light of the larger sub-narrative and the characters in the narrative.Using a narrative methodology, this study suggests that Paul inherited a meaning and a doxa narrative with characters from the Jewish Scriptures. While the Hebrew word that is most commonly translated doxa is kabod, twenty-nine other Hebrew words are also translated as doxa. Thus, the semantic range of doxa is not limited to honor, but also includes the following connotations: aesthetic beauty, riches and wealth, either figurative or literal majestic strength and weight, a visible manifestation, separateness and holiness, and a form and likeness. The major character attached to doxa is the intrinsic character of the doxa of the Lord, referring to his moral character of holiness, superiority over other gods, and visible manifestation. Additionally, the Lord grants, gives and crowns doxa to Adam (i.e. humanity), to Israel, to royal kings, and to the eschatological Servant. Moreover, there was an eschatological expectation of the vindication of the doxa of the Lord through the eschatological Servant.This dissertation suggests that Paul inherited the aforementioned narrative characters and developed and refined them in light of the Christ-event. Paul redefined the doxa of God as the identity of God’s intrinsic and essential character of importance, highlighted in his divine presence, truth, immortality, honor, judgment, and sovereign grace. Furthermore, Paul considers Adam (i.e.humanity) and Israel to be the representative of God’s derived doxa and image.Paul wanted his audience, Jews and Gentiles alike, to identify with the fallen Adam and with Israel, i.e. those who do not display the doxa of God due to idolatry. Paul then identifies Christ both as the intrinsic doxa of God, who represents God and the derivative doxa of God, namely the second Adam, the royal king, and the eschatological Servant. Thus, the Christ-event, his death,crucifixion and resurrection, inaugurates the vindication of doxa of God and the eschatological transformation of Adam (i.e. humanity), Israel, nations, and the entire creation. This change is not merely a return to humanity’s original image and glory, but a metamorphosis into Christ’s greater glory.Finally, Paul urges his audience to identify, not with the doxa of his opponents or Caesar, but with the sufferings of the crucified and risen Christ, the doxa of God, in order to glorify God. In his ethical paraenesis, taking into consideration the eschatological hope of total transformation into the likeness of the doxa of Christ at his parousia, Paul encourages believers to identify with Christ, which results in their transformation into the eschatological humanity of Christ-likeness. This transformation encompasses the sexual relationship between male and female as a display of the doxa of Christ. In addition, the renewed believing community of Jews and Gentiles that considers others before themselves is another outworking of the transformation. These practices glorify God and are present expressions of the vindication of the doxa of God in the believing humanity that awaits the final transformation to the likeness of the derivative glory of Christ. This dissertation contends that the vindication of the doxa of God through Christ and the transformation of the believers into the likeness of the image and doxa of Christ is the narrative structure that undergirds Paul’s doxa motif.

AB - This dissertation explores the use and meaning of the doxa motif in undisputed Pauline literature. While doxa and its derivatives occur 72 times in undisputed letters and 96 times altogether inPauline literature, the doxa motif has not received sufficient attention in Pauline studies. By examining Pauline doxa passages, the purpose of this research is to answer the following five questions:(1) What are the most significant characters and events that are attached to the doxa motif in the Jewish Scriptures? Consequently, what kind of narrative substructure, if any, do they form?(2) What are the characters and the events that are linked with doxa, and how do they relate to one another in Paul’s undisputed letters?(3) How do the characters and the substructure of the Jewish Scriptures shape the logic ofargumentation in passages where Paul mentions doxa?(4) How does Paul develop and redefine the narrative doxa motif in light of the Christ-event and the contemporary context, namely in the midst of the imperial cult that he is facing?(5) How does Paul want his audience, Jews and Gentiles alike, to identify with the narrative characters in the story?While the first question provides a necessary background for my study, the last four questions guide my research. The purpose of this methodology is to strive for us to comprehend the use of doxa in Pauline thought in light of the larger sub-narrative and the characters in the narrative.Using a narrative methodology, this study suggests that Paul inherited a meaning and a doxa narrative with characters from the Jewish Scriptures. While the Hebrew word that is most commonly translated doxa is kabod, twenty-nine other Hebrew words are also translated as doxa. Thus, the semantic range of doxa is not limited to honor, but also includes the following connotations: aesthetic beauty, riches and wealth, either figurative or literal majestic strength and weight, a visible manifestation, separateness and holiness, and a form and likeness. The major character attached to doxa is the intrinsic character of the doxa of the Lord, referring to his moral character of holiness, superiority over other gods, and visible manifestation. Additionally, the Lord grants, gives and crowns doxa to Adam (i.e. humanity), to Israel, to royal kings, and to the eschatological Servant. Moreover, there was an eschatological expectation of the vindication of the doxa of the Lord through the eschatological Servant.This dissertation suggests that Paul inherited the aforementioned narrative characters and developed and refined them in light of the Christ-event. Paul redefined the doxa of God as the identity of God’s intrinsic and essential character of importance, highlighted in his divine presence, truth, immortality, honor, judgment, and sovereign grace. Furthermore, Paul considers Adam (i.e.humanity) and Israel to be the representative of God’s derived doxa and image.Paul wanted his audience, Jews and Gentiles alike, to identify with the fallen Adam and with Israel, i.e. those who do not display the doxa of God due to idolatry. Paul then identifies Christ both as the intrinsic doxa of God, who represents God and the derivative doxa of God, namely the second Adam, the royal king, and the eschatological Servant. Thus, the Christ-event, his death,crucifixion and resurrection, inaugurates the vindication of doxa of God and the eschatological transformation of Adam (i.e. humanity), Israel, nations, and the entire creation. This change is not merely a return to humanity’s original image and glory, but a metamorphosis into Christ’s greater glory.Finally, Paul urges his audience to identify, not with the doxa of his opponents or Caesar, but with the sufferings of the crucified and risen Christ, the doxa of God, in order to glorify God. In his ethical paraenesis, taking into consideration the eschatological hope of total transformation into the likeness of the doxa of Christ at his parousia, Paul encourages believers to identify with Christ, which results in their transformation into the eschatological humanity of Christ-likeness. This transformation encompasses the sexual relationship between male and female as a display of the doxa of Christ. In addition, the renewed believing community of Jews and Gentiles that considers others before themselves is another outworking of the transformation. These practices glorify God and are present expressions of the vindication of the doxa of God in the believing humanity that awaits the final transformation to the likeness of the derivative glory of Christ. This dissertation contends that the vindication of the doxa of God through Christ and the transformation of the believers into the likeness of the image and doxa of Christ is the narrative structure that undergirds Paul’s doxa motif.

KW - 614 Theology

KW - Uuden testamentin eksegetiikka

KW - Uuden testamentin teologia

KW - Paavali

KW - kreikankieli (koine)

UR - https://www.teologia.fi/ajankohtaista/1556-vaeitoes-paavali-tulkitsi-juutalaista-kirkkaus-ajattelua-kristus-uskon-valossa

M3 - Doctoral Thesis

SN - 978-951-51-4253-5

PB - University of Helsinki

CY - Helsinki

ER -