The iTaukei Chief: Value and Alterity in Verata

Tutkimustuotos: ArtikkelijulkaisuArtikkeliTieteellinenvertaisarvioitu

Kuvaus

Over the course of the last century and a half, the structural and political underpinnings of Fijian chieftaincy have changed in significant ways and is no longer best represented by the union of the stranger-chief and local lineage. According to what must be the most widelyaccepted origin mythology in present-day Fiji, the first Fijians arrived from Tanganyika, Africa. Emphasising
the shared origins of all indigenous Fijians, this mythology denies the internal differentiation between autochthones and strangers that is often highlighted as a key constituent in Fijian political organization. In this ethnographic tradition, it is the “synthetic” combination of foreign charisma and autochthonous legitimation that holds up chieftaincy. Colonial-era Native Legislation reveals us a similar denial of the dichotomy in material and linguistic terms, overriding the distinction between the land-owning autochthones and the landless strangers,
respectively designated as the “owners” or “hosts” (taukei) and “strangers” or “guests” (vulagi). This article considers the 2010 governmental decision to replace the words “Fijian” or “native Fijian” with the word iTaukei in official English-language use as merely the most recent example of a development that has been in the making for a considerable while.
Alkuperäiskielienglanti
LehtiJournal de la Société des Océanistes
Vuosikerta141
Numero2
Sivut239-254
Sivumäärä15
TilaJulkaistu - 2015
OKM-julkaisutyyppiA1 Alkuperäisartikkeli tieteellisessä aikakauslehdessä, vertaisarvioitu

Tieteenalat

  • 5143 Sosiaali- ja kulttuuriantropologia

Lainaa tätä

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title = "The iTaukei Chief: Value and Alterity in Verata",
abstract = "Over the course of the last century and a half, the structural and political underpinnings of Fijian chieftaincy have changed in significant ways and is no longer best represented by the union of the stranger-chief and local lineage. According to what must be the most widelyaccepted origin mythology in present-day Fiji, the first Fijians arrived from Tanganyika, Africa. Emphasisingthe shared origins of all indigenous Fijians, this mythology denies the internal differentiation between autochthones and strangers that is often highlighted as a key constituent in Fijian political organization. In this ethnographic tradition, it is the “synthetic” combination of foreign charisma and autochthonous legitimation that holds up chieftaincy. Colonial-era Native Legislation reveals us a similar denial of the dichotomy in material and linguistic terms, overriding the distinction between the land-owning autochthones and the landless strangers,respectively designated as the “owners” or “hosts” (taukei) and “strangers” or “guests” (vulagi). This article considers the 2010 governmental decision to replace the words “Fijian” or “native Fijian” with the word iTaukei in official English-language use as merely the most recent example of a development that has been in the making for a considerable while.",
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The iTaukei Chief: Value and Alterity in Verata. / Eräsaari, Matti Aleksanteri.

julkaisussa: Journal de la Société des Océanistes, Vuosikerta 141, Nro 2, 2015, s. 239-254.

Tutkimustuotos: ArtikkelijulkaisuArtikkeliTieteellinenvertaisarvioitu

TY - JOUR

T1 - The iTaukei Chief: Value and Alterity in Verata

AU - Eräsaari, Matti Aleksanteri

PY - 2015

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N2 - Over the course of the last century and a half, the structural and political underpinnings of Fijian chieftaincy have changed in significant ways and is no longer best represented by the union of the stranger-chief and local lineage. According to what must be the most widelyaccepted origin mythology in present-day Fiji, the first Fijians arrived from Tanganyika, Africa. Emphasisingthe shared origins of all indigenous Fijians, this mythology denies the internal differentiation between autochthones and strangers that is often highlighted as a key constituent in Fijian political organization. In this ethnographic tradition, it is the “synthetic” combination of foreign charisma and autochthonous legitimation that holds up chieftaincy. Colonial-era Native Legislation reveals us a similar denial of the dichotomy in material and linguistic terms, overriding the distinction between the land-owning autochthones and the landless strangers,respectively designated as the “owners” or “hosts” (taukei) and “strangers” or “guests” (vulagi). This article considers the 2010 governmental decision to replace the words “Fijian” or “native Fijian” with the word iTaukei in official English-language use as merely the most recent example of a development that has been in the making for a considerable while.

AB - Over the course of the last century and a half, the structural and political underpinnings of Fijian chieftaincy have changed in significant ways and is no longer best represented by the union of the stranger-chief and local lineage. According to what must be the most widelyaccepted origin mythology in present-day Fiji, the first Fijians arrived from Tanganyika, Africa. Emphasisingthe shared origins of all indigenous Fijians, this mythology denies the internal differentiation between autochthones and strangers that is often highlighted as a key constituent in Fijian political organization. In this ethnographic tradition, it is the “synthetic” combination of foreign charisma and autochthonous legitimation that holds up chieftaincy. Colonial-era Native Legislation reveals us a similar denial of the dichotomy in material and linguistic terms, overriding the distinction between the land-owning autochthones and the landless strangers,respectively designated as the “owners” or “hosts” (taukei) and “strangers” or “guests” (vulagi). This article considers the 2010 governmental decision to replace the words “Fijian” or “native Fijian” with the word iTaukei in official English-language use as merely the most recent example of a development that has been in the making for a considerable while.

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JO - Journal de la Société des Océanistes

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