The Naked, Vulnerable, Crazy Girl

Tutkimustuotos: ArtikkelijulkaisuArtikkeliTieteellinenvertaisarvioitu

Kuvaus

In this article I explore the concept of the rebellious girl by examining the cases
of three different girls: an HIV activist in South Africa; a young feminist in Finland;
and a topless on-line protester in post-revolution Tunisia. Although their
contexts and messages vary greatly, there are marked similarities between and
amongst them. I suggest that, in general, the media, political movements, and
research agendas often appear to have difficulty taking girls’ protests seriously.
The rebellious girl is ridiculed, shunned, shamed, and disciplined. The protests
explored here can, however, be read as important visual interruptions that
attempt to invoke an epistemic mutiny that does not beg for inclusion on preexisting
terms but, rather, challenges the boundaries of acceptable bodily
integrity. They also gesture towards the social in a way that demands recognition,
acceptance, and support, not a simplified acceptance based on the notion of neoliberal
individual freedom.
Alkuperäiskielienglanti
LehtiGirlhood Studies
Vuosikerta8
Numero3
Sivut119-134
Sivumäärä16
ISSN1938-8209
DOI - pysyväislinkit
TilaJulkaistu - 2015
OKM-julkaisutyyppiA1 Alkuperäisartikkeli tieteellisessä aikakauslehdessä, vertaisarvioitu

Tieteenalat

  • 5141 Sosiologia
  • body, feminist politics, girls, protest, rebellion

Lainaa tätä

Oinas, Outi Elina. / The Naked, Vulnerable, Crazy Girl. Julkaisussa: Girlhood Studies. 2015 ; Vuosikerta 8, Nro 3. Sivut 119-134.
@article{18ab228d7688498e94e9058031030f38,
title = "The Naked, Vulnerable, Crazy Girl",
abstract = "In this article I explore the concept of the rebellious girl by examining the casesof three different girls: an HIV activist in South Africa; a young feminist in Finland;and a topless on-line protester in post-revolution Tunisia. Although theircontexts and messages vary greatly, there are marked similarities between andamongst them. I suggest that, in general, the media, political movements, andresearch agendas often appear to have difficulty taking girls’ protests seriously.The rebellious girl is ridiculed, shunned, shamed, and disciplined. The protestsexplored here can, however, be read as important visual interruptions thatattempt to invoke an epistemic mutiny that does not beg for inclusion on preexistingterms but, rather, challenges the boundaries of acceptable bodilyintegrity. They also gesture towards the social in a way that demands recognition,acceptance, and support, not a simplified acceptance based on the notion of neoliberalindividual freedom.",
keywords = "5141 Sociology, body, feminist politics, girls, protest, rebellion",
author = "Oinas, {Outi Elina}",
year = "2015",
doi = "10.3167/ghs.2015.080310",
language = "English",
volume = "8",
pages = "119--134",
journal = "Girlhood Studies",
issn = "1938-8209",
publisher = "Berghahn Books",
number = "3",

}

The Naked, Vulnerable, Crazy Girl. / Oinas, Outi Elina.

julkaisussa: Girlhood Studies, Vuosikerta 8, Nro 3, 2015, s. 119-134.

Tutkimustuotos: ArtikkelijulkaisuArtikkeliTieteellinenvertaisarvioitu

TY - JOUR

T1 - The Naked, Vulnerable, Crazy Girl

AU - Oinas, Outi Elina

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - In this article I explore the concept of the rebellious girl by examining the casesof three different girls: an HIV activist in South Africa; a young feminist in Finland;and a topless on-line protester in post-revolution Tunisia. Although theircontexts and messages vary greatly, there are marked similarities between andamongst them. I suggest that, in general, the media, political movements, andresearch agendas often appear to have difficulty taking girls’ protests seriously.The rebellious girl is ridiculed, shunned, shamed, and disciplined. The protestsexplored here can, however, be read as important visual interruptions thatattempt to invoke an epistemic mutiny that does not beg for inclusion on preexistingterms but, rather, challenges the boundaries of acceptable bodilyintegrity. They also gesture towards the social in a way that demands recognition,acceptance, and support, not a simplified acceptance based on the notion of neoliberalindividual freedom.

AB - In this article I explore the concept of the rebellious girl by examining the casesof three different girls: an HIV activist in South Africa; a young feminist in Finland;and a topless on-line protester in post-revolution Tunisia. Although theircontexts and messages vary greatly, there are marked similarities between andamongst them. I suggest that, in general, the media, political movements, andresearch agendas often appear to have difficulty taking girls’ protests seriously.The rebellious girl is ridiculed, shunned, shamed, and disciplined. The protestsexplored here can, however, be read as important visual interruptions thatattempt to invoke an epistemic mutiny that does not beg for inclusion on preexistingterms but, rather, challenges the boundaries of acceptable bodilyintegrity. They also gesture towards the social in a way that demands recognition,acceptance, and support, not a simplified acceptance based on the notion of neoliberalindividual freedom.

KW - 5141 Sociology

KW - body, feminist politics, girls, protest, rebellion

U2 - 10.3167/ghs.2015.080310

DO - 10.3167/ghs.2015.080310

M3 - Article

VL - 8

SP - 119

EP - 134

JO - Girlhood Studies

JF - Girlhood Studies

SN - 1938-8209

IS - 3

ER -