Urban wetland parks in Finland: improving water quality and creating endangered habitats

Outi Marjatta Wahlroos, Pasi Valkama, Emmi Mäkinen, Anne Ojala, Harri Vasander, Veli-Matti Väänänen, Anna Halonen, Leena Linden, Petri Nummi, Hannele Ahponen, Kirsti Lahti, Teuvo Vessman, Kari Rantakokko, Eero Nikinmaa

Tutkimustuotos: ArtikkelijulkaisuArtikkeliTieteellinenvertaisarvioitu

Kuvaus

Urbanization changes water balance, degrades water quality and disrupts habitats. Wetlands offer storm water volume and flow control, water pollution mitigation, and rich land–water interphase habitats. In the present case study, urban wetlands were designed and implemented to provide multiple functions, including water quality improvement and the establishment of critically endangered clay stream habitat, along a revived urban stream within the Baltic Sea watershed in Southern Finland. The primary water quality concern in the recipient lake is algal bloom controlling and clay particle-carried phosphorus.

Wetlands were monitored for functioning over five calendar years. At a wetland monitored for 5 years, herbaceous vegetation was well self-established in the second year, and reached 102 species, of which 97% were native, in the fifth growing season. Successful breeding of amphibians and water birds occurred right after construction. Continuous water quality monitoring over the fourth year at this wetland, with 0.1% area of its watershed, revealed seasonal and event-based differences: for total phosphorus, an annual 10% average with lower removal rates outside, and up to 71% event reductions during the growing season, while highest load reductions occurred during heavy rain and snowmelt events outside the growing season. The created wetlands provided critical habitat and beneficial functions and thus compensated partly for urbanization.
Alkuperäiskielienglanti
LehtiInternational Journal of Biodiversity Science, Ecosystem Services & Management
Vuosikerta11
Numero1
Sivut46-60
Sivumäärä15
ISSN2151-3732
DOI - pysyväislinkit
TilaJulkaistu - 2015
OKM-julkaisutyyppiA1 Alkuperäisartikkeli tieteellisessä aikakauslehdessä, vertaisarvioitu

Tieteenalat

  • 1171 Geotieteet
  • 1181 Ekologia, evoluutiobiologia
  • 1172 Ympäristötiede

Lainaa tätä

Wahlroos, Outi Marjatta ; Valkama, Pasi ; Mäkinen, Emmi ; Ojala, Anne ; Vasander, Harri ; Väänänen, Veli-Matti ; Halonen, Anna ; Linden, Leena ; Nummi, Petri ; Ahponen, Hannele ; Lahti, Kirsti ; Vessman, Teuvo ; Rantakokko, Kari ; Nikinmaa, Eero. / Urban wetland parks in Finland: improving water quality and creating endangered habitats. Julkaisussa: International Journal of Biodiversity Science, Ecosystem Services & Management. 2015 ; Vuosikerta 11, Nro 1. Sivut 46-60.
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title = "Urban wetland parks in Finland: improving water quality and creating endangered habitats",
abstract = "Urbanization changes water balance, degrades water quality and disrupts habitats. Wetlands offer storm water volume and flow control, water pollution mitigation, and rich land–water interphase habitats. In the present case study, urban wetlands were designed and implemented to provide multiple functions, including water quality improvement and the establishment of critically endangered clay stream habitat, along a revived urban stream within the Baltic Sea watershed in Southern Finland. The primary water quality concern in the recipient lake is algal bloom controlling and clay particle-carried phosphorus.Wetlands were monitored for functioning over five calendar years. At a wetland monitored for 5 years, herbaceous vegetation was well self-established in the second year, and reached 102 species, of which 97{\%} were native, in the fifth growing season. Successful breeding of amphibians and water birds occurred right after construction. Continuous water quality monitoring over the fourth year at this wetland, with 0.1{\%} area of its watershed, revealed seasonal and event-based differences: for total phosphorus, an annual 10{\%} average with lower removal rates outside, and up to 71{\%} event reductions during the growing season, while highest load reductions occurred during heavy rain and snowmelt events outside the growing season. The created wetlands provided critical habitat and beneficial functions and thus compensated partly for urbanization.",
keywords = "1171 Geosciences, 1181 Ecology, evolutionary biology, 1172 Environmental sciences",
author = "Wahlroos, {Outi Marjatta} and Pasi Valkama and Emmi M{\"a}kinen and Anne Ojala and Harri Vasander and Veli-Matti V{\"a}{\"a}n{\"a}nen and Anna Halonen and Leena Linden and Petri Nummi and Hannele Ahponen and Kirsti Lahti and Teuvo Vessman and Kari Rantakokko and Eero Nikinmaa",
year = "2015",
doi = "10.1080/21513732.2015.1006681",
language = "English",
volume = "11",
pages = "46--60",
journal = "International Journal of Biodiversity Science, Ecosystem Services & Management",
issn = "2151-3732",
publisher = "Taylor & Francis",
number = "1",

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Urban wetland parks in Finland: improving water quality and creating endangered habitats. / Wahlroos, Outi Marjatta; Valkama, Pasi ; Mäkinen, Emmi; Ojala, Anne; Vasander, Harri; Väänänen, Veli-Matti; Halonen, Anna; Linden, Leena; Nummi, Petri; Ahponen, Hannele; Lahti, Kirsti; Vessman, Teuvo; Rantakokko, Kari; Nikinmaa, Eero.

julkaisussa: International Journal of Biodiversity Science, Ecosystem Services & Management, Vuosikerta 11, Nro 1, 2015, s. 46-60.

Tutkimustuotos: ArtikkelijulkaisuArtikkeliTieteellinenvertaisarvioitu

TY - JOUR

T1 - Urban wetland parks in Finland: improving water quality and creating endangered habitats

AU - Wahlroos, Outi Marjatta

AU - Valkama, Pasi

AU - Mäkinen, Emmi

AU - Ojala, Anne

AU - Vasander, Harri

AU - Väänänen, Veli-Matti

AU - Halonen, Anna

AU - Linden, Leena

AU - Nummi, Petri

AU - Ahponen, Hannele

AU - Lahti, Kirsti

AU - Vessman, Teuvo

AU - Rantakokko, Kari

AU - Nikinmaa, Eero

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - Urbanization changes water balance, degrades water quality and disrupts habitats. Wetlands offer storm water volume and flow control, water pollution mitigation, and rich land–water interphase habitats. In the present case study, urban wetlands were designed and implemented to provide multiple functions, including water quality improvement and the establishment of critically endangered clay stream habitat, along a revived urban stream within the Baltic Sea watershed in Southern Finland. The primary water quality concern in the recipient lake is algal bloom controlling and clay particle-carried phosphorus.Wetlands were monitored for functioning over five calendar years. At a wetland monitored for 5 years, herbaceous vegetation was well self-established in the second year, and reached 102 species, of which 97% were native, in the fifth growing season. Successful breeding of amphibians and water birds occurred right after construction. Continuous water quality monitoring over the fourth year at this wetland, with 0.1% area of its watershed, revealed seasonal and event-based differences: for total phosphorus, an annual 10% average with lower removal rates outside, and up to 71% event reductions during the growing season, while highest load reductions occurred during heavy rain and snowmelt events outside the growing season. The created wetlands provided critical habitat and beneficial functions and thus compensated partly for urbanization.

AB - Urbanization changes water balance, degrades water quality and disrupts habitats. Wetlands offer storm water volume and flow control, water pollution mitigation, and rich land–water interphase habitats. In the present case study, urban wetlands were designed and implemented to provide multiple functions, including water quality improvement and the establishment of critically endangered clay stream habitat, along a revived urban stream within the Baltic Sea watershed in Southern Finland. The primary water quality concern in the recipient lake is algal bloom controlling and clay particle-carried phosphorus.Wetlands were monitored for functioning over five calendar years. At a wetland monitored for 5 years, herbaceous vegetation was well self-established in the second year, and reached 102 species, of which 97% were native, in the fifth growing season. Successful breeding of amphibians and water birds occurred right after construction. Continuous water quality monitoring over the fourth year at this wetland, with 0.1% area of its watershed, revealed seasonal and event-based differences: for total phosphorus, an annual 10% average with lower removal rates outside, and up to 71% event reductions during the growing season, while highest load reductions occurred during heavy rain and snowmelt events outside the growing season. The created wetlands provided critical habitat and beneficial functions and thus compensated partly for urbanization.

KW - 1171 Geosciences

KW - 1181 Ecology, evolutionary biology

KW - 1172 Environmental sciences

U2 - 10.1080/21513732.2015.1006681

DO - 10.1080/21513732.2015.1006681

M3 - Article

VL - 11

SP - 46

EP - 60

JO - International Journal of Biodiversity Science, Ecosystem Services & Management

JF - International Journal of Biodiversity Science, Ecosystem Services & Management

SN - 2151-3732

IS - 1

ER -