Using individual study profiles of first-year students in two different disciplines to predict graduation time

Tutkimustuotos: ArtikkelijulkaisuArtikkeliTieteellinenvertaisarvioitu

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Despite vast research on transitioning to higher education and student diversity, little longitudinal evidence exists of how individual differences of first-year students predict their graduation times. The present study explored the relation between first-year students' study profiles and graduation times in two different disciplines, by following the same students' (N = 65) study progress for six years using student records data. Profiling students was based on student interviews. Statistical analysis of time to degree completion was conducted using event history analysis. The results revealed that first-study-year study profiles clearly predict graduation times and degree completion. Disciplinary differences existed between graduation times, which may be explained by the different structures of the disciplines. The results imply that individual students need tailored support at different phases of their studies.

Alkuperäiskielienglanti
LehtiStudies in Higher Education
Sivumäärä15
ISSN0307-5079
DOI - pysyväislinkit
TilaE-pub ahead of print - 1 kesäkuuta 2019
OKM-julkaisutyyppiA1 Alkuperäisartikkeli tieteellisessä aikakauslehdessä, vertaisarvioitu

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title = "Using individual study profiles of first-year students in two different disciplines to predict graduation time",
abstract = "Despite vast research on transitioning to higher education and student diversity, little longitudinal evidence exists of how individual differences of first-year students predict their graduation times. The present study explored the relation between first-year students' study profiles and graduation times in two different disciplines, by following the same students' (N = 65) study progress for six years using student records data. Profiling students was based on student interviews. Statistical analysis of time to degree completion was conducted using event history analysis. The results revealed that first-study-year study profiles clearly predict graduation times and degree completion. Disciplinary differences existed between graduation times, which may be explained by the different structures of the disciplines. The results imply that individual students need tailored support at different phases of their studies.",
keywords = "ACHIEVEMENT, CLASSROOM, ENGAGEMENT, First study-year, HIGHER-EDUCATION, MOTIVATION, SELF-EFFICACY, SUCCESS, TRANSITION, follow-up, student diversity, study profiles, study progress, 516 Educational sciences",
author = "Telle Hailikari and Reijo Sund and Anne Haarala-Muhonen and Sari Lindblom-Yl{\"a}nne",
year = "2019",
month = "6",
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doi = "10.1080/03075079.2019.1623771",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Using individual study profiles of first-year students in two different disciplines to predict graduation time

AU - Hailikari, Telle

AU - Sund, Reijo

AU - Haarala-Muhonen, Anne

AU - Lindblom-Ylänne, Sari

PY - 2019/6/1

Y1 - 2019/6/1

N2 - Despite vast research on transitioning to higher education and student diversity, little longitudinal evidence exists of how individual differences of first-year students predict their graduation times. The present study explored the relation between first-year students' study profiles and graduation times in two different disciplines, by following the same students' (N = 65) study progress for six years using student records data. Profiling students was based on student interviews. Statistical analysis of time to degree completion was conducted using event history analysis. The results revealed that first-study-year study profiles clearly predict graduation times and degree completion. Disciplinary differences existed between graduation times, which may be explained by the different structures of the disciplines. The results imply that individual students need tailored support at different phases of their studies.

AB - Despite vast research on transitioning to higher education and student diversity, little longitudinal evidence exists of how individual differences of first-year students predict their graduation times. The present study explored the relation between first-year students' study profiles and graduation times in two different disciplines, by following the same students' (N = 65) study progress for six years using student records data. Profiling students was based on student interviews. Statistical analysis of time to degree completion was conducted using event history analysis. The results revealed that first-study-year study profiles clearly predict graduation times and degree completion. Disciplinary differences existed between graduation times, which may be explained by the different structures of the disciplines. The results imply that individual students need tailored support at different phases of their studies.

KW - ACHIEVEMENT

KW - CLASSROOM

KW - ENGAGEMENT

KW - First study-year

KW - HIGHER-EDUCATION

KW - MOTIVATION

KW - SELF-EFFICACY

KW - SUCCESS

KW - TRANSITION

KW - follow-up

KW - student diversity

KW - study profiles

KW - study progress

KW - 516 Educational sciences

U2 - 10.1080/03075079.2019.1623771

DO - 10.1080/03075079.2019.1623771

M3 - Article

JO - Studies in Higher Education

JF - Studies in Higher Education

SN - 0307-5079

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