Vitamin C and Infections

Tutkimustuotos: ArtikkelijulkaisuKatsausartikkeliTieteellinenvertaisarvioitu

Kuvaus

In the early literature, vitamin C deficiency was associated with pneumonia. After its identification, a number of studies investigated the effects of vitamin C on diverse infections. A total of 148 animal studies indicated that vitamin C may alleviate or prevent infections caused by bacteria, viruses, and protozoa. The most extensively studied human infection is the common cold. Vitamin C administration does not decrease the average incidence of colds in the general population, yet it halved the number of colds in physically active people. Regularly administered vitamin C has shortened the duration of colds, indicating a biological effect. However, the role of vitamin C in common cold treatment is unclear. Two controlled trials found a statistically significant dose-response, for the duration of common cold symptoms, with up to 6-8 g/day of vitamin C. Thus, the negative findings of some therapeutic common cold studies might be explained by the low doses of 3-4 g/day of vitamin C. Three controlled trials found that vitamin C prevented pneumonia. Two controlled trials found a treatment benefit of vitamin C for pneumonia patients. One controlled trial reported treatment benefits for tetanus patients. The effects of vitamin C against infections should be investigated further.
Alkuperäiskielienglanti
LehtiNutrients
Vuosikerta9
Numero4
Sivut339
Sivumäärä28
ISSN2072-6643
DOI - pysyväislinkit
TilaJulkaistu - 2017
OKM-julkaisutyyppiA2 Katsausartikkeli tieteellisessä aikakauslehdessä

Tieteenalat

  • 3121 Sisätaudit
  • 3142 Kansanterveystiede, ympäristö ja työterveys

Lainaa tätä

Hemilä, Harri. / Vitamin C and Infections. Julkaisussa: Nutrients. 2017 ; Vuosikerta 9, Nro 4. Sivut 339.
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title = "Vitamin C and Infections",
abstract = "In the early literature, vitamin C deficiency was associated with pneumonia. After its identification, a number of studies investigated the effects of vitamin C on diverse infections. A total of 148 animal studies indicated that vitamin C may alleviate or prevent infections caused by bacteria, viruses, and protozoa. The most extensively studied human infection is the common cold. Vitamin C administration does not decrease the average incidence of colds in the general population, yet it halved the number of colds in physically active people. Regularly administered vitamin C has shortened the duration of colds, indicating a biological effect. However, the role of vitamin C in common cold treatment is unclear. Two controlled trials found a statistically significant dose-response, for the duration of common cold symptoms, with up to 6-8 g/day of vitamin C. Thus, the negative findings of some therapeutic common cold studies might be explained by the low doses of 3-4 g/day of vitamin C. Three controlled trials found that vitamin C prevented pneumonia. Two controlled trials found a treatment benefit of vitamin C for pneumonia patients. One controlled trial reported treatment benefits for tetanus patients. The effects of vitamin C against infections should be investigated further.",
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author = "Harri Hemil{\"a}",
year = "2017",
doi = "10.3390/nu9040339",
language = "English",
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Vitamin C and Infections. / Hemilä, Harri.

julkaisussa: Nutrients, Vuosikerta 9, Nro 4, 2017, s. 339.

Tutkimustuotos: ArtikkelijulkaisuKatsausartikkeliTieteellinenvertaisarvioitu

TY - JOUR

T1 - Vitamin C and Infections

AU - Hemilä, Harri

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - In the early literature, vitamin C deficiency was associated with pneumonia. After its identification, a number of studies investigated the effects of vitamin C on diverse infections. A total of 148 animal studies indicated that vitamin C may alleviate or prevent infections caused by bacteria, viruses, and protozoa. The most extensively studied human infection is the common cold. Vitamin C administration does not decrease the average incidence of colds in the general population, yet it halved the number of colds in physically active people. Regularly administered vitamin C has shortened the duration of colds, indicating a biological effect. However, the role of vitamin C in common cold treatment is unclear. Two controlled trials found a statistically significant dose-response, for the duration of common cold symptoms, with up to 6-8 g/day of vitamin C. Thus, the negative findings of some therapeutic common cold studies might be explained by the low doses of 3-4 g/day of vitamin C. Three controlled trials found that vitamin C prevented pneumonia. Two controlled trials found a treatment benefit of vitamin C for pneumonia patients. One controlled trial reported treatment benefits for tetanus patients. The effects of vitamin C against infections should be investigated further.

AB - In the early literature, vitamin C deficiency was associated with pneumonia. After its identification, a number of studies investigated the effects of vitamin C on diverse infections. A total of 148 animal studies indicated that vitamin C may alleviate or prevent infections caused by bacteria, viruses, and protozoa. The most extensively studied human infection is the common cold. Vitamin C administration does not decrease the average incidence of colds in the general population, yet it halved the number of colds in physically active people. Regularly administered vitamin C has shortened the duration of colds, indicating a biological effect. However, the role of vitamin C in common cold treatment is unclear. Two controlled trials found a statistically significant dose-response, for the duration of common cold symptoms, with up to 6-8 g/day of vitamin C. Thus, the negative findings of some therapeutic common cold studies might be explained by the low doses of 3-4 g/day of vitamin C. Three controlled trials found that vitamin C prevented pneumonia. Two controlled trials found a treatment benefit of vitamin C for pneumonia patients. One controlled trial reported treatment benefits for tetanus patients. The effects of vitamin C against infections should be investigated further.

KW - 3121 Internal medicine

KW - Vitamin C

KW - Ascorbic Acid

KW - BACTERIA

KW - BACTERIAL TOXINS

KW - Common Cold

KW - herpes zoster

KW - Pneumonia

KW - Protozoa

KW - Respiratory tract infections

KW - tetanus

KW - Viruses

KW - 3142 Public health care science, environmental and occupational health

U2 - 10.3390/nu9040339

DO - 10.3390/nu9040339

M3 - Review Article

VL - 9

SP - 339

JO - Nutrients

JF - Nutrients

SN - 2072-6643

IS - 4

ER -