WHAT CAN BE LEARNED ABOUT STUDENTS' COMMUNICATION FROM GAZE-TRACKING?

Einat Heyd-Metzuyanim1, Eeva Haataja, Markku S. Hannula

Tutkimustuotos: KonferenssimateriaalitPosteri

Kuvaus

Increasingly, studies in the field of identity and positioning in mathematics learning take into account discursive data as well as non-verbal communication. This, within a general aim to understand how students’ identities are constructed interactionally within the mathematical activity (Heyd-Metzuyanim & Sfard, 2012). We present the communicational information that can be gained about an episode of mathematical problem solving from multiple advanced recorders, including multiple video cameras, Smartpen recorders and gaze tracking mobile glasses. Gaze tracking provides a window to what the student is attending to during interaction with the teacher and other students (Haataja, Garcia Moreno-Esteva, Toivanen, & Hannula, 2018).We ask – what do each of the recording devices add to our understanding of the episode? In particular, what does it add to our understanding of the interaction between subjectifying (communication about participants) and mathematizing (communication about mathematical objects)? Data included stationary videos from three perspectives as well as audio, Smartpen, and gaze recordings on a collaborative geometrical problem solving session of four Finnish 9th grade students. The students solved the task in their authentic mathematics classroom, and the lesson was instructed by their own mathematics teacher. Our findings show that understanding the episode was crucially based on each of the different recording mechanisms. Subjectifying communication was largely achieved by facial expressions, which were accessed by cameras pointing at students' faces. Through these, we gained access to the social conflicts existing between the students in the episode, which were hardly evident in other channels. For the mathematizing activity, the most crucial was the pen-data coupled by the exact audio information and the gaze data. Mathematizing could be spilt into inter-communicational and intra-communicational activity. Inter-communicational activity was achieved in this geometrical activity mostly by pointing and by deictic markers (e.g "here", "this"), for which the pen and gaze data were crucial. Gaze data gave indications of intra-communicational activity (thinking). Through it, we were able to see the detrimental effects that the subjectifying activity had on the mathematizing activity in terms of missed opportunities for advancing students' reasoning about the task.
Alkuperäiskielienglanti
SivutVol 4, 140
Sivumäärä1
TilaJulkaistu - 2019
OKM-julkaisutyyppiEi sovellu
TapahtumaAnnual Conference of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education - Pretoria, Etelä-Afrikka
Kesto: 7 heinäkuuta 201912 heinäkuuta 2019
Konferenssinumero: 43
https://www.up.ac.za/pme43/ https://www.conftool.com/pme43/

Konferenssi

KonferenssiAnnual Conference of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education
LyhennettäPME43
MaaEtelä-Afrikka
KaupunkiPretoria
Ajanjakso07/07/201912/07/2019
www-osoite

Lainaa tätä

Heyd-Metzuyanim1, E., Haataja, E., & Hannula, M. S. (2019). WHAT CAN BE LEARNED ABOUT STUDENTS' COMMUNICATION FROM GAZE-TRACKING?. Vol 4, 140. Posterin esittämispaikka: Annual Conference of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education, Pretoria, Etelä-Afrikka.
Heyd-Metzuyanim1, Einat ; Haataja, Eeva ; Hannula, Markku S. / WHAT CAN BE LEARNED ABOUT STUDENTS' COMMUNICATION FROM GAZE-TRACKING?. Posterin esittämispaikka: Annual Conference of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education, Pretoria, Etelä-Afrikka.1 Sivumäärä
@conference{eaecc8e0e47842f48d1c08a92f48cde5,
title = "WHAT CAN BE LEARNED ABOUT STUDENTS' COMMUNICATION FROM GAZE-TRACKING?",
abstract = "Increasingly, studies in the field of identity and positioning in mathematics learning take into account discursive data as well as non-verbal communication. This, within a general aim to understand how students’ identities are constructed interactionally within the mathematical activity (Heyd-Metzuyanim & Sfard, 2012). We present the communicational information that can be gained about an episode of mathematical problem solving from multiple advanced recorders, including multiple video cameras, Smartpen recorders and gaze tracking mobile glasses. Gaze tracking provides a window to what the student is attending to during interaction with the teacher and other students (Haataja, Garcia Moreno-Esteva, Toivanen, & Hannula, 2018).We ask – what do each of the recording devices add to our understanding of the episode? In particular, what does it add to our understanding of the interaction between subjectifying (communication about participants) and mathematizing (communication about mathematical objects)? Data included stationary videos from three perspectives as well as audio, Smartpen, and gaze recordings on a collaborative geometrical problem solving session of four Finnish 9th grade students. The students solved the task in their authentic mathematics classroom, and the lesson was instructed by their own mathematics teacher. Our findings show that understanding the episode was crucially based on each of the different recording mechanisms. Subjectifying communication was largely achieved by facial expressions, which were accessed by cameras pointing at students' faces. Through these, we gained access to the social conflicts existing between the students in the episode, which were hardly evident in other channels. For the mathematizing activity, the most crucial was the pen-data coupled by the exact audio information and the gaze data. Mathematizing could be spilt into inter-communicational and intra-communicational activity. Inter-communicational activity was achieved in this geometrical activity mostly by pointing and by deictic markers (e.g {"}here{"}, {"}this{"}), for which the pen and gaze data were crucial. Gaze data gave indications of intra-communicational activity (thinking). Through it, we were able to see the detrimental effects that the subjectifying activity had on the mathematizing activity in terms of missed opportunities for advancing students' reasoning about the task.",
author = "Einat Heyd-Metzuyanim1 and Eeva Haataja and Hannula, {Markku S.}",
year = "2019",
language = "English",
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note = "null ; Conference date: 07-07-2019 Through 12-07-2019",
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Heyd-Metzuyanim1, E, Haataja, E & Hannula, MS 2019, 'WHAT CAN BE LEARNED ABOUT STUDENTS' COMMUNICATION FROM GAZE-TRACKING?', Annual Conference of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education, Pretoria, Etelä-Afrikka, 07/07/2019 - 12/07/2019 Sivut Vol 4, 140.

WHAT CAN BE LEARNED ABOUT STUDENTS' COMMUNICATION FROM GAZE-TRACKING? / Heyd-Metzuyanim1, Einat; Haataja, Eeva; Hannula, Markku S.

2019. Vol 4, 140 Posterin esittämispaikka: Annual Conference of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education, Pretoria, Etelä-Afrikka.

Tutkimustuotos: KonferenssimateriaalitPosteri

TY - CONF

T1 - WHAT CAN BE LEARNED ABOUT STUDENTS' COMMUNICATION FROM GAZE-TRACKING?

AU - Heyd-Metzuyanim1, Einat

AU - Haataja, Eeva

AU - Hannula, Markku S.

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - Increasingly, studies in the field of identity and positioning in mathematics learning take into account discursive data as well as non-verbal communication. This, within a general aim to understand how students’ identities are constructed interactionally within the mathematical activity (Heyd-Metzuyanim & Sfard, 2012). We present the communicational information that can be gained about an episode of mathematical problem solving from multiple advanced recorders, including multiple video cameras, Smartpen recorders and gaze tracking mobile glasses. Gaze tracking provides a window to what the student is attending to during interaction with the teacher and other students (Haataja, Garcia Moreno-Esteva, Toivanen, & Hannula, 2018).We ask – what do each of the recording devices add to our understanding of the episode? In particular, what does it add to our understanding of the interaction between subjectifying (communication about participants) and mathematizing (communication about mathematical objects)? Data included stationary videos from three perspectives as well as audio, Smartpen, and gaze recordings on a collaborative geometrical problem solving session of four Finnish 9th grade students. The students solved the task in their authentic mathematics classroom, and the lesson was instructed by their own mathematics teacher. Our findings show that understanding the episode was crucially based on each of the different recording mechanisms. Subjectifying communication was largely achieved by facial expressions, which were accessed by cameras pointing at students' faces. Through these, we gained access to the social conflicts existing between the students in the episode, which were hardly evident in other channels. For the mathematizing activity, the most crucial was the pen-data coupled by the exact audio information and the gaze data. Mathematizing could be spilt into inter-communicational and intra-communicational activity. Inter-communicational activity was achieved in this geometrical activity mostly by pointing and by deictic markers (e.g "here", "this"), for which the pen and gaze data were crucial. Gaze data gave indications of intra-communicational activity (thinking). Through it, we were able to see the detrimental effects that the subjectifying activity had on the mathematizing activity in terms of missed opportunities for advancing students' reasoning about the task.

AB - Increasingly, studies in the field of identity and positioning in mathematics learning take into account discursive data as well as non-verbal communication. This, within a general aim to understand how students’ identities are constructed interactionally within the mathematical activity (Heyd-Metzuyanim & Sfard, 2012). We present the communicational information that can be gained about an episode of mathematical problem solving from multiple advanced recorders, including multiple video cameras, Smartpen recorders and gaze tracking mobile glasses. Gaze tracking provides a window to what the student is attending to during interaction with the teacher and other students (Haataja, Garcia Moreno-Esteva, Toivanen, & Hannula, 2018).We ask – what do each of the recording devices add to our understanding of the episode? In particular, what does it add to our understanding of the interaction between subjectifying (communication about participants) and mathematizing (communication about mathematical objects)? Data included stationary videos from three perspectives as well as audio, Smartpen, and gaze recordings on a collaborative geometrical problem solving session of four Finnish 9th grade students. The students solved the task in their authentic mathematics classroom, and the lesson was instructed by their own mathematics teacher. Our findings show that understanding the episode was crucially based on each of the different recording mechanisms. Subjectifying communication was largely achieved by facial expressions, which were accessed by cameras pointing at students' faces. Through these, we gained access to the social conflicts existing between the students in the episode, which were hardly evident in other channels. For the mathematizing activity, the most crucial was the pen-data coupled by the exact audio information and the gaze data. Mathematizing could be spilt into inter-communicational and intra-communicational activity. Inter-communicational activity was achieved in this geometrical activity mostly by pointing and by deictic markers (e.g "here", "this"), for which the pen and gaze data were crucial. Gaze data gave indications of intra-communicational activity (thinking). Through it, we were able to see the detrimental effects that the subjectifying activity had on the mathematizing activity in terms of missed opportunities for advancing students' reasoning about the task.

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Heyd-Metzuyanim1 E, Haataja E, Hannula MS. WHAT CAN BE LEARNED ABOUT STUDENTS' COMMUNICATION FROM GAZE-TRACKING?. 2019. Posterin esittämispaikka: Annual Conference of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education, Pretoria, Etelä-Afrikka.