När vuxna möter pojkar i skolan - insyn, inflytande och sociala relationer

Tutkimustuotos: OpinnäyteVäitöskirjaMonografia

Kuvaus

The aim of this thesis, is to realistically describe how the need for help and
support among boys are expressed and recognized, as well as to show how
relationships between boys and adults condition the way boys are
approached in school. The analysis draws upon an ethnographic study that
was conducted in two upper level-secondary schools in Helsinki. The field
work took place from 1. September 2008 to 29. May 2009.
The theoretical framework is based on Roy Bhaskar’s and Margaret S.
Archer’s work on critical realism. In the analysis I have also employed Derek
Layder’s domain theory and Thomas J. Scheff’s theory on social bonds.
The study approaches two questions: (1.) How are boys’ problems and need of
support recognized in the everyday life activities in classrooms? (2.) How do
relationships between adults and boys condition adults ability to recognize boys’
problems in school and how do relationships condition the encounters between adults
and boys in school? The first research question focuses on how boys’ need for
support are recognized in everyday practice in the classrooms. The offset is
that supportive practices in schools derive from teachers observations of a
problem within the everyday life setting in class. The second research
question focuses on relationships between adults and boys in school, and on
social encounters between boys and adults. The premise is that problems in
schools can be defined as relational and that relationships condition
everyday life encounters between adults and pupils in schools.
The ethnographic description begins with an analysis of how boys’ problems
and need for support manifest themselves in the classroom. Observations
from within the classroom walls help to make descriptions of everyday
school-problems concrete. However, since classrooms are primarily social
contexts – constituted by individuals and relations between them – and each
classroom have its own social “setting,” descriptions of problems that arise
within a classroom, and the discussion of these descriptions, must be seen as
“situated”. That a given problem that arises in one classroom is concrete,
does not mean that this problem exists – at least not in the same shape –
outside this particular classroom.
9
There are problems in classrooms that are more clearly linked to boys than to
girls. Boys tend to show more problems regarding school motivation and
have more problems with disturbing behavior. This does not mean that all
problems regarding boys on classrooms are gender specific. Boys, just like
girls, have various kinds of problems in class, and ”boys” must be
understood as a heterogenic category when it comes to problems in school.
From a social relationship perspective, problems with boys in schools can be
understood in terms of un-attuned or unsecure social bonds. An insecure
relationship can be defined as constituted by either too tight or too loose
bonds. Too loose bonds often manifest themselves in terms of indifference in
the child – in particular towards school or towards adults in school. Another
way in which ”loose bonds” manifest themselves is by the pupil becoming
invisible in class and lack social influence within social interplay in school.
Adults’ ability to recognize different pupils vary and some pupils are more
commonly left unnoticed than others. Too tight bonds can be defined as
conflicted relationships or as strained relationships. The conclusion of the
relationally oriented study is that the quality of social bonds between
students and adults effects adults’ ability to recognize boys’ and encounter
boys needs and desires. How boys experience welfare workers is also
conditioned by the quality of social bonds between boys and welfare
professionals.
The study shows that there are three types of adult-boy relationships in
school that do not enable constructive encounters between adults and boys.
Boys’ that are not taken seriously is a category of boys whose problems are not
recognized as “real” problems. Motivational problems and boys reluctant
attitudes towards schoolwork can be often viewed as a natural boy feature,
and not as a real problem. Boys’ who don’t evoke feelings is another category of
boys whose problems are unnoticed in school. The study suggests that the
typical boy, who is neither particularly loud nor overly quiet, is often left
unnoticed. Boys who do well do not evoke emotions within the everyday life
in classrooms. The typical boy is easily regarded as someone who is doing
just fine, in reference to the noisy and loud boys’ and the silent poor boys.
Boys’ who evoke negative emotions is a category of boys whose problems are
mainly regarded as a problem for the class environment and not as a
10
problem for the individual. Behavioral problems are often recognized in
class, but it is common that interventions target the problem with the
classroom environment and not the problem with the individual.
The study concludes with a model that can be used to identify different
qualities in social bonds between adults and pupils in school. The
foundational thought of the model is that adults in schools can evaluate their
relationships to pupils by reflecting on three elements in social relations. (1.)
The level of insight: the extent to which the adult know about the individual
life career of a pupil. (2.) The level of influence: the extent to which the adults’
initiatives are recognized by the pupil. (3.) Emotional atmosphere: the quality of
emotions that derives from the interplay between an adult and a pupil.
Alkuperäiskieliruotsi
JulkaisupaikkaHelsingfors
Kustantaja
Painoksen ISBN978-952-5588-84-2
Sähköinen ISBN978-952-5588-85-9
TilaJulkaistu - 2013
OKM-julkaisutyyppiG4 Tohtorinväitöskirja (monografia)

Tieteenalat

  • 5145 Sosiaalityö

Lainaa tätä

Lunabba, H. T. (2013). När vuxna möter pojkar i skolan - insyn, inflytande och sociala relationer. Helsingfors: Finlandssvenska kompetenscentret inom det sociala området.
Lunabba, Harry Torsten. / När vuxna möter pojkar i skolan - insyn, inflytande och sociala relationer. Helsingfors : Finlandssvenska kompetenscentret inom det sociala området, 2013. 214 Sivumäärä
@phdthesis{dbb1cfebb4234007a7ada84bf6c98ae3,
title = "N{\"a}r vuxna m{\"o}ter pojkar i skolan - insyn, inflytande och sociala relationer",
abstract = "The aim of this thesis, is to realistically describe how the need for help andsupport among boys are expressed and recognized, as well as to show howrelationships between boys and adults condition the way boys areapproached in school. The analysis draws upon an ethnographic study thatwas conducted in two upper level-secondary schools in Helsinki. The fieldwork took place from 1. September 2008 to 29. May 2009.The theoretical framework is based on Roy Bhaskar’s and Margaret S.Archer’s work on critical realism. In the analysis I have also employed DerekLayder’s domain theory and Thomas J. Scheff’s theory on social bonds.The study approaches two questions: (1.) How are boys’ problems and need ofsupport recognized in the everyday life activities in classrooms? (2.) How dorelationships between adults and boys condition adults ability to recognize boys’problems in school and how do relationships condition the encounters between adultsand boys in school? The first research question focuses on how boys’ need forsupport are recognized in everyday practice in the classrooms. The offset isthat supportive practices in schools derive from teachers observations of aproblem within the everyday life setting in class. The second researchquestion focuses on relationships between adults and boys in school, and onsocial encounters between boys and adults. The premise is that problems inschools can be defined as relational and that relationships conditioneveryday life encounters between adults and pupils in schools.The ethnographic description begins with an analysis of how boys’ problemsand need for support manifest themselves in the classroom. Observationsfrom within the classroom walls help to make descriptions of everydayschool-problems concrete. However, since classrooms are primarily socialcontexts – constituted by individuals and relations between them – and eachclassroom have its own social “setting,” descriptions of problems that arisewithin a classroom, and the discussion of these descriptions, must be seen as“situated”. That a given problem that arises in one classroom is concrete,does not mean that this problem exists – at least not in the same shape –outside this particular classroom.9There are problems in classrooms that are more clearly linked to boys than togirls. Boys tend to show more problems regarding school motivation andhave more problems with disturbing behavior. This does not mean that allproblems regarding boys on classrooms are gender specific. Boys, just likegirls, have various kinds of problems in class, and ”boys” must beunderstood as a heterogenic category when it comes to problems in school.From a social relationship perspective, problems with boys in schools can beunderstood in terms of un-attuned or unsecure social bonds. An insecurerelationship can be defined as constituted by either too tight or too loosebonds. Too loose bonds often manifest themselves in terms of indifference inthe child – in particular towards school or towards adults in school. Anotherway in which ”loose bonds” manifest themselves is by the pupil becominginvisible in class and lack social influence within social interplay in school.Adults’ ability to recognize different pupils vary and some pupils are morecommonly left unnoticed than others. Too tight bonds can be defined asconflicted relationships or as strained relationships. The conclusion of therelationally oriented study is that the quality of social bonds betweenstudents and adults effects adults’ ability to recognize boys’ and encounterboys needs and desires. How boys experience welfare workers is alsoconditioned by the quality of social bonds between boys and welfareprofessionals.The study shows that there are three types of adult-boy relationships inschool that do not enable constructive encounters between adults and boys.Boys’ that are not taken seriously is a category of boys whose problems are notrecognized as “real” problems. Motivational problems and boys reluctantattitudes towards schoolwork can be often viewed as a natural boy feature,and not as a real problem. Boys’ who don’t evoke feelings is another category ofboys whose problems are unnoticed in school. The study suggests that thetypical boy, who is neither particularly loud nor overly quiet, is often leftunnoticed. Boys who do well do not evoke emotions within the everyday lifein classrooms. The typical boy is easily regarded as someone who is doingjust fine, in reference to the noisy and loud boys’ and the silent poor boys.Boys’ who evoke negative emotions is a category of boys whose problems aremainly regarded as a problem for the class environment and not as a10problem for the individual. Behavioral problems are often recognized inclass, but it is common that interventions target the problem with theclassroom environment and not the problem with the individual.The study concludes with a model that can be used to identify differentqualities in social bonds between adults and pupils in school. Thefoundational thought of the model is that adults in schools can evaluate theirrelationships to pupils by reflecting on three elements in social relations. (1.)The level of insight: the extent to which the adult know about the individuallife career of a pupil. (2.) The level of influence: the extent to which the adults’initiatives are recognized by the pupil. (3.) Emotional atmosphere: the quality ofemotions that derives from the interplay between an adult and a pupil.",
keywords = "5145 Socialarbete, Boys, school, welfare work, welfare practices, social work, critical realism, social bonds, social relationships",
author = "Lunabba, {Harry Torsten}",
year = "2013",
language = "svenska",
isbn = "978-952-5588-84-2",
series = "Mathilda Wrede-institutets forskningsserie",
publisher = "Finlandssvenska kompetenscentret inom det sociala omr{\aa}det",
number = "1/2013",
address = "Finland",

}

När vuxna möter pojkar i skolan - insyn, inflytande och sociala relationer. / Lunabba, Harry Torsten.

Helsingfors : Finlandssvenska kompetenscentret inom det sociala området, 2013. 214 s.

Tutkimustuotos: OpinnäyteVäitöskirjaMonografia

TY - THES

T1 - När vuxna möter pojkar i skolan - insyn, inflytande och sociala relationer

AU - Lunabba, Harry Torsten

PY - 2013

Y1 - 2013

N2 - The aim of this thesis, is to realistically describe how the need for help andsupport among boys are expressed and recognized, as well as to show howrelationships between boys and adults condition the way boys areapproached in school. The analysis draws upon an ethnographic study thatwas conducted in two upper level-secondary schools in Helsinki. The fieldwork took place from 1. September 2008 to 29. May 2009.The theoretical framework is based on Roy Bhaskar’s and Margaret S.Archer’s work on critical realism. In the analysis I have also employed DerekLayder’s domain theory and Thomas J. Scheff’s theory on social bonds.The study approaches two questions: (1.) How are boys’ problems and need ofsupport recognized in the everyday life activities in classrooms? (2.) How dorelationships between adults and boys condition adults ability to recognize boys’problems in school and how do relationships condition the encounters between adultsand boys in school? The first research question focuses on how boys’ need forsupport are recognized in everyday practice in the classrooms. The offset isthat supportive practices in schools derive from teachers observations of aproblem within the everyday life setting in class. The second researchquestion focuses on relationships between adults and boys in school, and onsocial encounters between boys and adults. The premise is that problems inschools can be defined as relational and that relationships conditioneveryday life encounters between adults and pupils in schools.The ethnographic description begins with an analysis of how boys’ problemsand need for support manifest themselves in the classroom. Observationsfrom within the classroom walls help to make descriptions of everydayschool-problems concrete. However, since classrooms are primarily socialcontexts – constituted by individuals and relations between them – and eachclassroom have its own social “setting,” descriptions of problems that arisewithin a classroom, and the discussion of these descriptions, must be seen as“situated”. That a given problem that arises in one classroom is concrete,does not mean that this problem exists – at least not in the same shape –outside this particular classroom.9There are problems in classrooms that are more clearly linked to boys than togirls. Boys tend to show more problems regarding school motivation andhave more problems with disturbing behavior. This does not mean that allproblems regarding boys on classrooms are gender specific. Boys, just likegirls, have various kinds of problems in class, and ”boys” must beunderstood as a heterogenic category when it comes to problems in school.From a social relationship perspective, problems with boys in schools can beunderstood in terms of un-attuned or unsecure social bonds. An insecurerelationship can be defined as constituted by either too tight or too loosebonds. Too loose bonds often manifest themselves in terms of indifference inthe child – in particular towards school or towards adults in school. Anotherway in which ”loose bonds” manifest themselves is by the pupil becominginvisible in class and lack social influence within social interplay in school.Adults’ ability to recognize different pupils vary and some pupils are morecommonly left unnoticed than others. Too tight bonds can be defined asconflicted relationships or as strained relationships. The conclusion of therelationally oriented study is that the quality of social bonds betweenstudents and adults effects adults’ ability to recognize boys’ and encounterboys needs and desires. How boys experience welfare workers is alsoconditioned by the quality of social bonds between boys and welfareprofessionals.The study shows that there are three types of adult-boy relationships inschool that do not enable constructive encounters between adults and boys.Boys’ that are not taken seriously is a category of boys whose problems are notrecognized as “real” problems. Motivational problems and boys reluctantattitudes towards schoolwork can be often viewed as a natural boy feature,and not as a real problem. Boys’ who don’t evoke feelings is another category ofboys whose problems are unnoticed in school. The study suggests that thetypical boy, who is neither particularly loud nor overly quiet, is often leftunnoticed. Boys who do well do not evoke emotions within the everyday lifein classrooms. The typical boy is easily regarded as someone who is doingjust fine, in reference to the noisy and loud boys’ and the silent poor boys.Boys’ who evoke negative emotions is a category of boys whose problems aremainly regarded as a problem for the class environment and not as a10problem for the individual. Behavioral problems are often recognized inclass, but it is common that interventions target the problem with theclassroom environment and not the problem with the individual.The study concludes with a model that can be used to identify differentqualities in social bonds between adults and pupils in school. Thefoundational thought of the model is that adults in schools can evaluate theirrelationships to pupils by reflecting on three elements in social relations. (1.)The level of insight: the extent to which the adult know about the individuallife career of a pupil. (2.) The level of influence: the extent to which the adults’initiatives are recognized by the pupil. (3.) Emotional atmosphere: the quality ofemotions that derives from the interplay between an adult and a pupil.

AB - The aim of this thesis, is to realistically describe how the need for help andsupport among boys are expressed and recognized, as well as to show howrelationships between boys and adults condition the way boys areapproached in school. The analysis draws upon an ethnographic study thatwas conducted in two upper level-secondary schools in Helsinki. The fieldwork took place from 1. September 2008 to 29. May 2009.The theoretical framework is based on Roy Bhaskar’s and Margaret S.Archer’s work on critical realism. In the analysis I have also employed DerekLayder’s domain theory and Thomas J. Scheff’s theory on social bonds.The study approaches two questions: (1.) How are boys’ problems and need ofsupport recognized in the everyday life activities in classrooms? (2.) How dorelationships between adults and boys condition adults ability to recognize boys’problems in school and how do relationships condition the encounters between adultsand boys in school? The first research question focuses on how boys’ need forsupport are recognized in everyday practice in the classrooms. The offset isthat supportive practices in schools derive from teachers observations of aproblem within the everyday life setting in class. The second researchquestion focuses on relationships between adults and boys in school, and onsocial encounters between boys and adults. The premise is that problems inschools can be defined as relational and that relationships conditioneveryday life encounters between adults and pupils in schools.The ethnographic description begins with an analysis of how boys’ problemsand need for support manifest themselves in the classroom. Observationsfrom within the classroom walls help to make descriptions of everydayschool-problems concrete. However, since classrooms are primarily socialcontexts – constituted by individuals and relations between them – and eachclassroom have its own social “setting,” descriptions of problems that arisewithin a classroom, and the discussion of these descriptions, must be seen as“situated”. That a given problem that arises in one classroom is concrete,does not mean that this problem exists – at least not in the same shape –outside this particular classroom.9There are problems in classrooms that are more clearly linked to boys than togirls. Boys tend to show more problems regarding school motivation andhave more problems with disturbing behavior. This does not mean that allproblems regarding boys on classrooms are gender specific. Boys, just likegirls, have various kinds of problems in class, and ”boys” must beunderstood as a heterogenic category when it comes to problems in school.From a social relationship perspective, problems with boys in schools can beunderstood in terms of un-attuned or unsecure social bonds. An insecurerelationship can be defined as constituted by either too tight or too loosebonds. Too loose bonds often manifest themselves in terms of indifference inthe child – in particular towards school or towards adults in school. Anotherway in which ”loose bonds” manifest themselves is by the pupil becominginvisible in class and lack social influence within social interplay in school.Adults’ ability to recognize different pupils vary and some pupils are morecommonly left unnoticed than others. Too tight bonds can be defined asconflicted relationships or as strained relationships. The conclusion of therelationally oriented study is that the quality of social bonds betweenstudents and adults effects adults’ ability to recognize boys’ and encounterboys needs and desires. How boys experience welfare workers is alsoconditioned by the quality of social bonds between boys and welfareprofessionals.The study shows that there are three types of adult-boy relationships inschool that do not enable constructive encounters between adults and boys.Boys’ that are not taken seriously is a category of boys whose problems are notrecognized as “real” problems. Motivational problems and boys reluctantattitudes towards schoolwork can be often viewed as a natural boy feature,and not as a real problem. Boys’ who don’t evoke feelings is another category ofboys whose problems are unnoticed in school. The study suggests that thetypical boy, who is neither particularly loud nor overly quiet, is often leftunnoticed. Boys who do well do not evoke emotions within the everyday lifein classrooms. The typical boy is easily regarded as someone who is doingjust fine, in reference to the noisy and loud boys’ and the silent poor boys.Boys’ who evoke negative emotions is a category of boys whose problems aremainly regarded as a problem for the class environment and not as a10problem for the individual. Behavioral problems are often recognized inclass, but it is common that interventions target the problem with theclassroom environment and not the problem with the individual.The study concludes with a model that can be used to identify differentqualities in social bonds between adults and pupils in school. Thefoundational thought of the model is that adults in schools can evaluate theirrelationships to pupils by reflecting on three elements in social relations. (1.)The level of insight: the extent to which the adult know about the individuallife career of a pupil. (2.) The level of influence: the extent to which the adults’initiatives are recognized by the pupil. (3.) Emotional atmosphere: the quality ofemotions that derives from the interplay between an adult and a pupil.

KW - 5145 Socialarbete

KW - Boys

KW - school

KW - welfare work

KW - welfare practices

KW - social work

KW - critical realism

KW - social bonds

KW - social relationships

M3 - Doktorsavhandling

SN - 978-952-5588-84-2

T3 - Mathilda Wrede-institutets forskningsserie

PB - Finlandssvenska kompetenscentret inom det sociala området

CY - Helsingfors

ER -

Lunabba HT. När vuxna möter pojkar i skolan - insyn, inflytande och sociala relationer. Helsingfors: Finlandssvenska kompetenscentret inom det sociala området, 2013. 214 s. (Mathilda Wrede-institutets forskningsserie; 1/2013).