A Mind in Training: Philo of Alexandria on Jacob’s Spiritual Exercises

Forskningsoutput: TidskriftsbidragArtikelVetenskapligPeer review

Sammanfattning

How does Philo of Alexandria depict the formation of a wise person? This article pays attention to the centrality of spiritual training in Graeco-Roman philosophy, and argues that Philo likewise regards the process of seeking wisdom as entailing mental practice. The analysis focuses on two passages of Quis rerum divinarum heres sit and Legum allegoriarum where Philo attributes lists of spiritual exercises to the figure of Jacob. As such, these accounts illustrate how Philo makes use of scriptural interpretation as he imagines the execution of a life dedicated to wisdom. The listed exercises are largely familiar from Graeco-Roman philosophical traditions, yet they coexist with and contribute to the performance of Philo's ancestral tradition. This mlange of cultural elements suggests that Philo discusses Jacob's inner cultivation in order to enable his audience to grasp (one prospect of) how to lead a Jewish philosophical life in the Roman Alexandria.

Originalspråkengelska
TidskriftJournal for the study of the pseudepigrapha
Volym27
Utgåva4
Sidor (från-till)265–288
Antal sidor24
ISSN0951-8207
DOI
StatusPublicerad - jun 2018
MoE-publikationstypA1 Tidskriftsartikel-refererad

Vetenskapsgrenar

  • 614 Teologi

Citera det här

@article{4cd244b382874231b76cdbb6d816c1d5,
title = "A Mind in Training: Philo of Alexandria on Jacob’s Spiritual Exercises",
abstract = "How does Philo of Alexandria depict the formation of a wise person? This article pays attention to the centrality of spiritual training in Graeco-Roman philosophy, and argues that Philo likewise regards the process of seeking wisdom as entailing mental practice. The analysis focuses on two passages of Quis rerum divinarum heres sit and Legum allegoriarum where Philo attributes lists of spiritual exercises to the figure of Jacob. As such, these accounts illustrate how Philo makes use of scriptural interpretation as he imagines the execution of a life dedicated to wisdom. The listed exercises are largely familiar from Graeco-Roman philosophical traditions, yet they coexist with and contribute to the performance of Philo's ancestral tradition. This mlange of cultural elements suggests that Philo discusses Jacob's inner cultivation in order to enable his audience to grasp (one prospect of) how to lead a Jewish philosophical life in the Roman Alexandria.",
keywords = "614 Theology, Philo of Alexandria, philosophical training, spiritual exercises, the figure of Jacob, scriptural interpretation, Judaism as philosophy",
author = "Uusim{\"a}ki, {Elisa Katariina}",
year = "2018",
month = "6",
doi = "10.1177/0951820718786198",
language = "English",
volume = "27",
pages = "265–288",
journal = "Journal for the study of the pseudepigrapha",
issn = "0951-8207",
publisher = "Sage",
number = "4",

}

A Mind in Training : Philo of Alexandria on Jacob’s Spiritual Exercises. / Uusimäki, Elisa Katariina.

I: Journal for the study of the pseudepigrapha, Vol. 27, Nr. 4, 06.2018, s. 265–288.

Forskningsoutput: TidskriftsbidragArtikelVetenskapligPeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - A Mind in Training

T2 - Philo of Alexandria on Jacob’s Spiritual Exercises

AU - Uusimäki, Elisa Katariina

PY - 2018/6

Y1 - 2018/6

N2 - How does Philo of Alexandria depict the formation of a wise person? This article pays attention to the centrality of spiritual training in Graeco-Roman philosophy, and argues that Philo likewise regards the process of seeking wisdom as entailing mental practice. The analysis focuses on two passages of Quis rerum divinarum heres sit and Legum allegoriarum where Philo attributes lists of spiritual exercises to the figure of Jacob. As such, these accounts illustrate how Philo makes use of scriptural interpretation as he imagines the execution of a life dedicated to wisdom. The listed exercises are largely familiar from Graeco-Roman philosophical traditions, yet they coexist with and contribute to the performance of Philo's ancestral tradition. This mlange of cultural elements suggests that Philo discusses Jacob's inner cultivation in order to enable his audience to grasp (one prospect of) how to lead a Jewish philosophical life in the Roman Alexandria.

AB - How does Philo of Alexandria depict the formation of a wise person? This article pays attention to the centrality of spiritual training in Graeco-Roman philosophy, and argues that Philo likewise regards the process of seeking wisdom as entailing mental practice. The analysis focuses on two passages of Quis rerum divinarum heres sit and Legum allegoriarum where Philo attributes lists of spiritual exercises to the figure of Jacob. As such, these accounts illustrate how Philo makes use of scriptural interpretation as he imagines the execution of a life dedicated to wisdom. The listed exercises are largely familiar from Graeco-Roman philosophical traditions, yet they coexist with and contribute to the performance of Philo's ancestral tradition. This mlange of cultural elements suggests that Philo discusses Jacob's inner cultivation in order to enable his audience to grasp (one prospect of) how to lead a Jewish philosophical life in the Roman Alexandria.

KW - 614 Theology

KW - Philo of Alexandria

KW - philosophical training

KW - spiritual exercises

KW - the figure of Jacob

KW - scriptural interpretation

KW - Judaism as philosophy

U2 - 10.1177/0951820718786198

DO - 10.1177/0951820718786198

M3 - Article

VL - 27

SP - 265

EP - 288

JO - Journal for the study of the pseudepigrapha

JF - Journal for the study of the pseudepigrapha

SN - 0951-8207

IS - 4

ER -