Adaptation decorrelates shape representations

Marcelo G. Mattar, Maria Olkkonen, Russell A. Epstein, Geoffrey K. Aguirre

Forskningsoutput: TidskriftsbidragArtikelVetenskapligPeer review

Sammanfattning

Perception and neural responses are modulated by sensory history. Visual adaptation, an example of such an effect, has been hypothesized to improve stimulus discrimination by decorrelating responses across a set of neural units. While a central theoretical model, behavioral and neural evidence for this theory is limited and inconclusive. Here, we use a parametric 3D shape-space to test whether adaptation decorrelates shape representations in humans. In a behavioral experiment with 20 subjects, we find that adaptation to a shape class improves discrimination of subsequently presented stimuli with similar features. In a BOLD fMRI experiment with 10 subjects, we observe that adaptation to a shape class decorrelates the multivariate representations of subsequently presented stimuli with similar features in object-selective cortex. These results support the long-standing proposal that adaptation improves perceptual discrimination and decorrelates neural representations, offering insights into potential underlying mechanisms.
Originalspråkengelska
Artikelnummer3812
TidskriftNature Communications
Volym9
Antal sidor9
ISSN2041-1723
DOI
StatusPublicerad - 19 sep 2018
MoE-publikationstypA1 Tidskriftsartikel-refererad

Vetenskapsgrenar

  • 515 Psykologi

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Mattar, Marcelo G. ; Olkkonen, Maria ; Epstein, Russell A. ; Aguirre, Geoffrey K. / Adaptation decorrelates shape representations. I: Nature Communications. 2018 ; Vol. 9.
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Adaptation decorrelates shape representations. / Mattar, Marcelo G.; Olkkonen, Maria; Epstein, Russell A.; Aguirre, Geoffrey K.

I: Nature Communications, Vol. 9, 3812, 19.09.2018.

Forskningsoutput: TidskriftsbidragArtikelVetenskapligPeer review

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AU - Olkkonen, Maria

AU - Epstein, Russell A.

AU - Aguirre, Geoffrey K.

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