Sammanfattning

Understanding worldwide patterns of human use of sites of international significance for biodiversity conservation is crucial for meeting global conservation targets. However, robust global datasets are scarce. In this study, we used social media data, mined from Flickr and Twitter, geolocated in Important Bird and Biodiversity Areas (IBAs) to assess i) patterns of popularity; ii) relationships of this popularitywith geographical and biological variables; and iii) identify sites under high pressure fromvisitors. IBAs located in Europe and Asia, and in temperate biomes, had the highest density of users. Sites of importance for congregatory species, which were also more accessible, more densely populated and provided more tourism facilities, received higher visitation than did sites richer in bird species. Wefound 17% of all IBAs assessed to be under very high threat also received high visitation. Our results showinwhich IBAs enhancedmonitoring should be implemented to reduce potential visitation risks to sites of conservation concern for birds, and to harness the potential benefits of tourism for conservation. (C) 2019 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V.

Originalspråkengelska
TidskriftScience of the Total Environment
Volym683
Sidor (från-till)617-623
Antal sidor7
ISSN0048-9697
DOI
StatusPublicerad - 15 sep 2019
MoE-publikationstypA1 Tidskriftsartikel-refererad

Vetenskapsgrenar

  • 1172 Miljövetenskap

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title = "Assessing global popularity and threats to Important Bird and Biodiversity Areas using social media data",
abstract = "Understanding worldwide patterns of human use of sites of international significance for biodiversity conservation is crucial for meeting global conservation targets. However, robust global datasets are scarce. In this study, we used social media data, mined from Flickr and Twitter, geolocated in Important Bird and Biodiversity Areas (IBAs) to assess i) patterns of popularity; ii) relationships of this popularitywith geographical and biological variables; and iii) identify sites under high pressure fromvisitors. IBAs located in Europe and Asia, and in temperate biomes, had the highest density of users. Sites of importance for congregatory species, which were also more accessible, more densely populated and provided more tourism facilities, received higher visitation than did sites richer in bird species. Wefound 17{\%} of all IBAs assessed to be under very high threat also received high visitation. Our results showinwhich IBAs enhancedmonitoring should be implemented to reduce potential visitation risks to sites of conservation concern for birds, and to harness the potential benefits of tourism for conservation. (C) 2019 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V.",
keywords = "1172 Environmental sciences, Social media, Biodiversity, Big data, Ecotourism, IBAs, Threat, CONSERVATION, INDICATOR, TOURISM",
author = "Anna Hausmann and Tuuli Toivonen and Christoph Fink and Heikinheimo, {Vuokko Vilhelmiina} and Henrikki Tenkanen and Stuart Butchart and Thomas Brooks and {Di Minin}, Enrico",
year = "2019",
month = "9",
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doi = "10.1016/j.scitotenv.2019.05.268",
language = "English",
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pages = "617--623",
journal = "Science of the Total Environment",
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publisher = "Elsevier Scientific Publ. Co",

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TY - JOUR

T1 - Assessing global popularity and threats to Important Bird and Biodiversity Areas using social media data

AU - Hausmann, Anna

AU - Toivonen, Tuuli

AU - Fink, Christoph

AU - Heikinheimo, Vuokko Vilhelmiina

AU - Tenkanen, Henrikki

AU - Butchart, Stuart

AU - Brooks, Thomas

AU - Di Minin, Enrico

PY - 2019/9/15

Y1 - 2019/9/15

N2 - Understanding worldwide patterns of human use of sites of international significance for biodiversity conservation is crucial for meeting global conservation targets. However, robust global datasets are scarce. In this study, we used social media data, mined from Flickr and Twitter, geolocated in Important Bird and Biodiversity Areas (IBAs) to assess i) patterns of popularity; ii) relationships of this popularitywith geographical and biological variables; and iii) identify sites under high pressure fromvisitors. IBAs located in Europe and Asia, and in temperate biomes, had the highest density of users. Sites of importance for congregatory species, which were also more accessible, more densely populated and provided more tourism facilities, received higher visitation than did sites richer in bird species. Wefound 17% of all IBAs assessed to be under very high threat also received high visitation. Our results showinwhich IBAs enhancedmonitoring should be implemented to reduce potential visitation risks to sites of conservation concern for birds, and to harness the potential benefits of tourism for conservation. (C) 2019 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V.

AB - Understanding worldwide patterns of human use of sites of international significance for biodiversity conservation is crucial for meeting global conservation targets. However, robust global datasets are scarce. In this study, we used social media data, mined from Flickr and Twitter, geolocated in Important Bird and Biodiversity Areas (IBAs) to assess i) patterns of popularity; ii) relationships of this popularitywith geographical and biological variables; and iii) identify sites under high pressure fromvisitors. IBAs located in Europe and Asia, and in temperate biomes, had the highest density of users. Sites of importance for congregatory species, which were also more accessible, more densely populated and provided more tourism facilities, received higher visitation than did sites richer in bird species. Wefound 17% of all IBAs assessed to be under very high threat also received high visitation. Our results showinwhich IBAs enhancedmonitoring should be implemented to reduce potential visitation risks to sites of conservation concern for birds, and to harness the potential benefits of tourism for conservation. (C) 2019 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V.

KW - 1172 Environmental sciences

KW - Social media

KW - Biodiversity

KW - Big data

KW - Ecotourism

KW - IBAs

KW - Threat

KW - CONSERVATION

KW - INDICATOR

KW - TOURISM

U2 - 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2019.05.268

DO - 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2019.05.268

M3 - Article

VL - 683

SP - 617

EP - 623

JO - Science of the Total Environment

JF - Science of the Total Environment

SN - 0048-9697

ER -