Sammanfattning

Tourism is among the fastest growing industries worldwide and protected areas are among the main attractors for tourists seeking nature-based experiences. Nature-based tourism provides opportunities (e.g. by generating financial incentives and socio-political support for management and conservation), but also generates threats (e.g. by increasing human pressure and disturbance) to biodiversity conservation in protected areas. Information about human use and visitation, as well as threats related to human activity, in protected areas is key for informing sustainable management. Yet, such information at a global scale remains scarce and collecting new data is expensive. We live in the Information-age, where a wealth of digital information is becoming increasingly available thanks to the widespread use of technologies, such as smartphones. Web-sharing platforms, such as social media, are growing popular worldwide, and tourists use them to actively share their experiences (through pictures, text and videos) while visiting protected areas. Data mined from social media and can provide novel approaches to explore human activities and use of protected areas worldwide, and inform conservation science and practices. In this study, we use social media data from Twitter, Instagram, and Flickr to assess global patterns of human use in 12,765 Important Bird and Biodiversity Areas (IBAs). We hypothesize that attractiveness of the IBA increases the likelihood of posting and that social media postings intensify in areas where threats to biodiversity are high. We found that European and Asian IBAs had highest social media density compared to other continents. Using generalized linear models, we found that both species richness, habitat type (IBA attractiveness), accessibility and human footprint (used as threat proxy) best explained social media postings in IBAs, although the effect of each variable varied across different continents. In addition, we identified countries where IBAs are more (14% of all IBAs, mostly in Europe and North America and Asia) or less (16% of all IBAs mostly in Africa and Australia & Oceania) exposed to visitation pressure. Results provide new understanding of the use of fine scale data from social media to assess both popularity (recreational value) and, potentially, exposure to human pressure in priority sites for the persistence of species globally.
Originalspråkengelska
DOI
StatusPublicerad - 13 jun 2018
MoE-publikationstypEj behörig
EvenemangEuropean Congress of Conservation Biology - Jyväskylä, Finland
Varaktighet: 12 jun 201815 jun 2018
Konferensnummer: 5

Konferens

KonferensEuropean Congress of Conservation Biology
Förkortad titelECCB2018
LandFinland
OrtJyväskylä
Period12/06/201815/06/2018

Vetenskapsgrenar

  • 1172 Miljövetenskap
  • 518 Medie- och kommunikationsvetenskap

Citera det här

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abstract = "Tourism is among the fastest growing industries worldwide and protected areas are among the main attractors for tourists seeking nature-based experiences. Nature-based tourism provides opportunities (e.g. by generating financial incentives and socio-political support for management and conservation), but also generates threats (e.g. by increasing human pressure and disturbance) to biodiversity conservation in protected areas. Information about human use and visitation, as well as threats related to human activity, in protected areas is key for informing sustainable management. Yet, such information at a global scale remains scarce and collecting new data is expensive. We live in the Information-age, where a wealth of digital information is becoming increasingly available thanks to the widespread use of technologies, such as smartphones. Web-sharing platforms, such as social media, are growing popular worldwide, and tourists use them to actively share their experiences (through pictures, text and videos) while visiting protected areas. Data mined from social media and can provide novel approaches to explore human activities and use of protected areas worldwide, and inform conservation science and practices. In this study, we use social media data from Twitter, Instagram, and Flickr to assess global patterns of human use in 12,765 Important Bird and Biodiversity Areas (IBAs). We hypothesize that attractiveness of the IBA increases the likelihood of posting and that social media postings intensify in areas where threats to biodiversity are high. We found that European and Asian IBAs had highest social media density compared to other continents. Using generalized linear models, we found that both species richness, habitat type (IBA attractiveness), accessibility and human footprint (used as threat proxy) best explained social media postings in IBAs, although the effect of each variable varied across different continents. In addition, we identified countries where IBAs are more (14{\%} of all IBAs, mostly in Europe and North America and Asia) or less (16{\%} of all IBAs mostly in Africa and Australia & Oceania) exposed to visitation pressure. Results provide new understanding of the use of fine scale data from social media to assess both popularity (recreational value) and, potentially, exposure to human pressure in priority sites for the persistence of species globally.",
keywords = "1172 Environmental sciences, 518 Media and communications",
author = "Anna Hausmann and Toivonen, {Tuuli Kaarina} and Fink, {Christoph Alexander} and Heikinheimo, {Vuokko Vilhelmiina} and {Di Minin}, Enrico and Tenkanen, {Henrikki Toivo Olavi} and Butchart, {Stuart H. M.} and Brooks, {Thomas M.}",
year = "2018",
month = "6",
day = "13",
doi = "10.17011/conference/eccb2018/108084",
language = "English",
note = "European Congress of Conservation Biology, ECCB2018 ; Conference date: 12-06-2018 Through 15-06-2018",

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Assessing global tourism visitation of Important Bird Areas by using social media data. / Hausmann, Anna; Toivonen, Tuuli Kaarina; Fink, Christoph Alexander; Heikinheimo, Vuokko Vilhelmiina; Di Minin, Enrico; Tenkanen, Henrikki Toivo Olavi; Butchart, Stuart H. M.; Brooks, Thomas M.

2018. Abstract från ECCB 2018 - European Congress of Conservation Biology , Jyväskylä, Finland.

Forskningsoutput: KonferensbidragSammanfattningForskningPeer review

TY - CONF

T1 - Assessing global tourism visitation of Important Bird Areas by using social media data

AU - Hausmann, Anna

AU - Toivonen, Tuuli Kaarina

AU - Fink, Christoph Alexander

AU - Heikinheimo, Vuokko Vilhelmiina

AU - Di Minin, Enrico

AU - Tenkanen, Henrikki Toivo Olavi

AU - Butchart, Stuart H. M.

AU - Brooks, Thomas M.

PY - 2018/6/13

Y1 - 2018/6/13

N2 - Tourism is among the fastest growing industries worldwide and protected areas are among the main attractors for tourists seeking nature-based experiences. Nature-based tourism provides opportunities (e.g. by generating financial incentives and socio-political support for management and conservation), but also generates threats (e.g. by increasing human pressure and disturbance) to biodiversity conservation in protected areas. Information about human use and visitation, as well as threats related to human activity, in protected areas is key for informing sustainable management. Yet, such information at a global scale remains scarce and collecting new data is expensive. We live in the Information-age, where a wealth of digital information is becoming increasingly available thanks to the widespread use of technologies, such as smartphones. Web-sharing platforms, such as social media, are growing popular worldwide, and tourists use them to actively share their experiences (through pictures, text and videos) while visiting protected areas. Data mined from social media and can provide novel approaches to explore human activities and use of protected areas worldwide, and inform conservation science and practices. In this study, we use social media data from Twitter, Instagram, and Flickr to assess global patterns of human use in 12,765 Important Bird and Biodiversity Areas (IBAs). We hypothesize that attractiveness of the IBA increases the likelihood of posting and that social media postings intensify in areas where threats to biodiversity are high. We found that European and Asian IBAs had highest social media density compared to other continents. Using generalized linear models, we found that both species richness, habitat type (IBA attractiveness), accessibility and human footprint (used as threat proxy) best explained social media postings in IBAs, although the effect of each variable varied across different continents. In addition, we identified countries where IBAs are more (14% of all IBAs, mostly in Europe and North America and Asia) or less (16% of all IBAs mostly in Africa and Australia & Oceania) exposed to visitation pressure. Results provide new understanding of the use of fine scale data from social media to assess both popularity (recreational value) and, potentially, exposure to human pressure in priority sites for the persistence of species globally.

AB - Tourism is among the fastest growing industries worldwide and protected areas are among the main attractors for tourists seeking nature-based experiences. Nature-based tourism provides opportunities (e.g. by generating financial incentives and socio-political support for management and conservation), but also generates threats (e.g. by increasing human pressure and disturbance) to biodiversity conservation in protected areas. Information about human use and visitation, as well as threats related to human activity, in protected areas is key for informing sustainable management. Yet, such information at a global scale remains scarce and collecting new data is expensive. We live in the Information-age, where a wealth of digital information is becoming increasingly available thanks to the widespread use of technologies, such as smartphones. Web-sharing platforms, such as social media, are growing popular worldwide, and tourists use them to actively share their experiences (through pictures, text and videos) while visiting protected areas. Data mined from social media and can provide novel approaches to explore human activities and use of protected areas worldwide, and inform conservation science and practices. In this study, we use social media data from Twitter, Instagram, and Flickr to assess global patterns of human use in 12,765 Important Bird and Biodiversity Areas (IBAs). We hypothesize that attractiveness of the IBA increases the likelihood of posting and that social media postings intensify in areas where threats to biodiversity are high. We found that European and Asian IBAs had highest social media density compared to other continents. Using generalized linear models, we found that both species richness, habitat type (IBA attractiveness), accessibility and human footprint (used as threat proxy) best explained social media postings in IBAs, although the effect of each variable varied across different continents. In addition, we identified countries where IBAs are more (14% of all IBAs, mostly in Europe and North America and Asia) or less (16% of all IBAs mostly in Africa and Australia & Oceania) exposed to visitation pressure. Results provide new understanding of the use of fine scale data from social media to assess both popularity (recreational value) and, potentially, exposure to human pressure in priority sites for the persistence of species globally.

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KW - 518 Media and communications

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DO - 10.17011/conference/eccb2018/108084

M3 - Abstract

ER -