Sammanfattning

Illegal wildlife trade is one of the biggest threats to biodiversity conservation, as many species, including iconic species such as rhinoceroses and elephants, are targeted for their meat, trophies and other body parts. With estimated 2.5 billion users, the ease of access has turned social media into an important venue for sharing nature-based content from conservation areas. However, social media users often release geotagged photos and other information that might reveal the occurrence of species in conservation areas. This has risen concerns, especially in the fight against illegal killing of commercially valuable species, such as rhinoceros, elephants and cycads. Openly posted social media content can, in fact, can be freely accessed via the application programming interface of social media platforms.
No previous study has assessed the associations between social media data posts and illegal killings using empirical data. In this study, we fill this gap, and assess the spatio-temporal relationships between the geotagged social media posts containing pictures of and textual references to rhinoceroses and the actual locations of where rhinoceroses were killed inside Kruger National Park in South Africa. For doing this, we used social media content posted on Twitter, Instagram and Flickr between 2013 and 2015, and empirical data on illegal killings. Our results highlight the need for conservation authorities to work in collaboration with social media companies to prevent the release of locations of valuable species and further educate the general public.
Originalspråkengelska
StatusPublicerad - 6 mar 2018
MoE-publikationstypEj behörig
EvenemangSavanna Science Network Meeting - Nombolo Mdluli Conference Centre, Skukuza, Kruger National Park, Sydafrika
Varaktighet: 4 mar 20189 mar 2018
Konferensnummer: 2018

Konferens

KonferensSavanna Science Network Meeting
Förkortad titelSSNM
LandSydafrika
OrtSkukuza, Kruger National Park
Period04/03/201809/03/2018

Vetenskapsgrenar

  • 1172 Miljövetenskap
  • 518 Medie- och kommunikationsvetenskap

Citera det här

Di Minin, E., Fink, C. A., Hausmann, A., Heikinheimo, V. V., Slotow, R., Tenkanen, H. T. O., & Toivonen, T. K. (2018). Can poachers locate rhinoceroses using social media data?. Abstract från Savanna Science Network Meeting, Skukuza, Kruger National Park, Sydafrika.
@conference{1f285eb55cce4bcd92a92f9837df688e,
title = "Can poachers locate rhinoceroses using social media data?",
abstract = "Illegal wildlife trade is one of the biggest threats to biodiversity conservation, as many species, including iconic species such as rhinoceroses and elephants, are targeted for their meat, trophies and other body parts. With estimated 2.5 billion users, the ease of access has turned social media into an important venue for sharing nature-based content from conservation areas. However, social media users often release geotagged photos and other information that might reveal the occurrence of species in conservation areas. This has risen concerns, especially in the fight against illegal killing of commercially valuable species, such as rhinoceros, elephants and cycads. Openly posted social media content can, in fact, can be freely accessed via the application programming interface of social media platforms.No previous study has assessed the associations between social media data posts and illegal killings using empirical data. In this study, we fill this gap, and assess the spatio-temporal relationships between the geotagged social media posts containing pictures of and textual references to rhinoceroses and the actual locations of where rhinoceroses were killed inside Kruger National Park in South Africa. For doing this, we used social media content posted on Twitter, Instagram and Flickr between 2013 and 2015, and empirical data on illegal killings. Our results highlight the need for conservation authorities to work in collaboration with social media companies to prevent the release of locations of valuable species and further educate the general public.",
keywords = "1172 Environmental sciences, 518 Media and communications",
author = "{Di Minin}, Enrico and Fink, {Christoph Alexander} and Anna Hausmann and Heikinheimo, {Vuokko Vilhelmiina} and Rob Slotow and Tenkanen, {Henrikki Toivo Olavi} and Toivonen, {Tuuli Kaarina}",
year = "2018",
month = "3",
day = "6",
language = "English",
note = "Savanna Science Network Meeting, SSNM ; Conference date: 04-03-2018 Through 09-03-2018",

}

Di Minin, E, Fink, CA, Hausmann, A, Heikinheimo, VV, Slotow, R, Tenkanen, HTO & Toivonen, TK 2018, 'Can poachers locate rhinoceroses using social media data?' Savanna Science Network Meeting, Skukuza, Kruger National Park, Sydafrika, 04/03/2018 - 09/03/2018, .

Can poachers locate rhinoceroses using social media data? / Di Minin, Enrico; Fink, Christoph Alexander; Hausmann, Anna; Heikinheimo, Vuokko Vilhelmiina; Slotow, Rob; Tenkanen, Henrikki Toivo Olavi; Toivonen, Tuuli Kaarina.

2018. Abstract från Savanna Science Network Meeting, Skukuza, Kruger National Park, Sydafrika.

Forskningsoutput: KonferensbidragSammanfattningForskning

TY - CONF

T1 - Can poachers locate rhinoceroses using social media data?

AU - Di Minin, Enrico

AU - Fink, Christoph Alexander

AU - Hausmann, Anna

AU - Heikinheimo, Vuokko Vilhelmiina

AU - Slotow, Rob

AU - Tenkanen, Henrikki Toivo Olavi

AU - Toivonen, Tuuli Kaarina

PY - 2018/3/6

Y1 - 2018/3/6

N2 - Illegal wildlife trade is one of the biggest threats to biodiversity conservation, as many species, including iconic species such as rhinoceroses and elephants, are targeted for their meat, trophies and other body parts. With estimated 2.5 billion users, the ease of access has turned social media into an important venue for sharing nature-based content from conservation areas. However, social media users often release geotagged photos and other information that might reveal the occurrence of species in conservation areas. This has risen concerns, especially in the fight against illegal killing of commercially valuable species, such as rhinoceros, elephants and cycads. Openly posted social media content can, in fact, can be freely accessed via the application programming interface of social media platforms.No previous study has assessed the associations between social media data posts and illegal killings using empirical data. In this study, we fill this gap, and assess the spatio-temporal relationships between the geotagged social media posts containing pictures of and textual references to rhinoceroses and the actual locations of where rhinoceroses were killed inside Kruger National Park in South Africa. For doing this, we used social media content posted on Twitter, Instagram and Flickr between 2013 and 2015, and empirical data on illegal killings. Our results highlight the need for conservation authorities to work in collaboration with social media companies to prevent the release of locations of valuable species and further educate the general public.

AB - Illegal wildlife trade is one of the biggest threats to biodiversity conservation, as many species, including iconic species such as rhinoceroses and elephants, are targeted for their meat, trophies and other body parts. With estimated 2.5 billion users, the ease of access has turned social media into an important venue for sharing nature-based content from conservation areas. However, social media users often release geotagged photos and other information that might reveal the occurrence of species in conservation areas. This has risen concerns, especially in the fight against illegal killing of commercially valuable species, such as rhinoceros, elephants and cycads. Openly posted social media content can, in fact, can be freely accessed via the application programming interface of social media platforms.No previous study has assessed the associations between social media data posts and illegal killings using empirical data. In this study, we fill this gap, and assess the spatio-temporal relationships between the geotagged social media posts containing pictures of and textual references to rhinoceroses and the actual locations of where rhinoceroses were killed inside Kruger National Park in South Africa. For doing this, we used social media content posted on Twitter, Instagram and Flickr between 2013 and 2015, and empirical data on illegal killings. Our results highlight the need for conservation authorities to work in collaboration with social media companies to prevent the release of locations of valuable species and further educate the general public.

KW - 1172 Environmental sciences

KW - 518 Media and communications

M3 - Abstract

ER -

Di Minin E, Fink CA, Hausmann A, Heikinheimo VV, Slotow R, Tenkanen HTO et al. Can poachers locate rhinoceroses using social media data?. 2018. Abstract från Savanna Science Network Meeting, Skukuza, Kruger National Park, Sydafrika.