Challenges and Prospects in Ocean Circulation Models

Baylor Fox-Kemper, Alistair Adcroft, Claus W. Böning, Eric P. Chassignet, Enrique Curchitser, Gokhan Danabasoglu, Carsten Eden, Matthew H. England, Rüdiger Gerdes, Richard J. Greatbatch, Stephen M. Griffies, Robert W. Hallberg, Emmanuel Hanert, Patrick Heimbach, Helene T. Hewitt, Christopher N. Hill, Yoshiki Komuro, Sonya Legg, Julien Le Sommer, Simona Masina & 8 andra Simon J. Marsland, Stephen G. Penny, Fangli Qiao, Todd D. Ringler, Anne Marie Treguier, Hiroyuki Tsujino, Petteri Uotila, Stephen G. Yeager

Forskningsoutput: TidskriftsbidragÖversiktsartikelVetenskapligPeer review

Sammanfattning

We revisit the challenges and prospects for ocean circulation models following Griffies et al. (2010). Over the past decade, ocean circulation models evolved through improved understanding, numerics, spatial discretization, grid configurations, parameterizations, data assimilation, environmental monitoring, and process-level observations and modeling. Important large scale applications over the last decade are simulations of the Southern Ocean, the Meridional Overturning Circulation and its variability, and regional sea level change. Submesoscale variability is now routinely resolved in process models and permitted in a few global models, and submesoscale effects are parameterized in most global models. The scales where nonhydrostatic effects become important are beginning to be resolved in regional and process models. Coupling to sea ice, ice shelves, and high-resolution atmospheric models has stimulated new ideas and driven improvements in numerics. Observations have provided insight into turbulence and mixing around the globe and assessed through perturbed physics models. Relatedly, parameterizations of the mixing and overturning processes in boundary layers and the ocean interior have improved. New diagnostics being used for evaluating models alongside present and novel observations are briefly referenced. The overall goal is summarizing new developments in ocean modeling, including: how new and existing observations can be used, what modeling challenges remain, and how simulations can be used to support observations.
Originalspråkengelska
Artikelnummer65
TidskriftFrontiers in Marine Science
Volym6
Antal sidor29
ISSN2296-7745
DOI
StatusPublicerad - 26 feb 2019
MoE-publikationstypA2 Granska artikel i en vetenskaplig tidskrift

Vetenskapsgrenar

  • 1171 Geovetenskaper

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Fox-Kemper, B., Adcroft, A., Böning, C. W., Chassignet, E. P., Curchitser, E., Danabasoglu, G., ... Yeager, S. G. (2019). Challenges and Prospects in Ocean Circulation Models. Frontiers in Marine Science, 6, [65]. https://doi.org/10.3389/fmars.2019.00065
Fox-Kemper, Baylor ; Adcroft, Alistair ; Böning, Claus W. ; Chassignet, Eric P. ; Curchitser, Enrique ; Danabasoglu, Gokhan ; Eden, Carsten ; England, Matthew H. ; Gerdes, Rüdiger ; Greatbatch, Richard J. ; Griffies, Stephen M. ; Hallberg, Robert W. ; Hanert, Emmanuel ; Heimbach, Patrick ; Hewitt, Helene T. ; Hill, Christopher N. ; Komuro, Yoshiki ; Legg, Sonya ; Le Sommer, Julien ; Masina, Simona ; Marsland, Simon J. ; Penny, Stephen G. ; Qiao, Fangli ; Ringler, Todd D. ; Treguier, Anne Marie ; Tsujino, Hiroyuki ; Uotila, Petteri ; Yeager, Stephen G. / Challenges and Prospects in Ocean Circulation Models. I: Frontiers in Marine Science. 2019 ; Vol. 6.
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title = "Challenges and Prospects in Ocean Circulation Models",
abstract = "We revisit the challenges and prospects for ocean circulation models following Griffies et al. (2010). Over the past decade, ocean circulation models evolved through improved understanding, numerics, spatial discretization, grid configurations, parameterizations, data assimilation, environmental monitoring, and process-level observations and modeling. Important large scale applications over the last decade are simulations of the Southern Ocean, the Meridional Overturning Circulation and its variability, and regional sea level change. Submesoscale variability is now routinely resolved in process models and permitted in a few global models, and submesoscale effects are parameterized in most global models. The scales where nonhydrostatic effects become important are beginning to be resolved in regional and process models. Coupling to sea ice, ice shelves, and high-resolution atmospheric models has stimulated new ideas and driven improvements in numerics. Observations have provided insight into turbulence and mixing around the globe and assessed through perturbed physics models. Relatedly, parameterizations of the mixing and overturning processes in boundary layers and the ocean interior have improved. New diagnostics being used for evaluating models alongside present and novel observations are briefly referenced. The overall goal is summarizing new developments in ocean modeling, including: how new and existing observations can be used, what modeling challenges remain, and how simulations can be used to support observations.",
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author = "Baylor Fox-Kemper and Alistair Adcroft and B{\"o}ning, {Claus W.} and Chassignet, {Eric P.} and Enrique Curchitser and Gokhan Danabasoglu and Carsten Eden and England, {Matthew H.} and R{\"u}diger Gerdes and Greatbatch, {Richard J.} and Griffies, {Stephen M.} and Hallberg, {Robert W.} and Emmanuel Hanert and Patrick Heimbach and Hewitt, {Helene T.} and Hill, {Christopher N.} and Yoshiki Komuro and Sonya Legg and {Le Sommer}, Julien and Simona Masina and Marsland, {Simon J.} and Penny, {Stephen G.} and Fangli Qiao and Ringler, {Todd D.} and Treguier, {Anne Marie} and Hiroyuki Tsujino and Petteri Uotila and Yeager, {Stephen G.}",
year = "2019",
month = "2",
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journal = "Frontiers in Marine Science",
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Fox-Kemper, B, Adcroft, A, Böning, CW, Chassignet, EP, Curchitser, E, Danabasoglu, G, Eden, C, England, MH, Gerdes, R, Greatbatch, RJ, Griffies, SM, Hallberg, RW, Hanert, E, Heimbach, P, Hewitt, HT, Hill, CN, Komuro, Y, Legg, S, Le Sommer, J, Masina, S, Marsland, SJ, Penny, SG, Qiao, F, Ringler, TD, Treguier, AM, Tsujino, H, Uotila, P & Yeager, SG 2019, 'Challenges and Prospects in Ocean Circulation Models', Frontiers in Marine Science, vol. 6, 65. https://doi.org/10.3389/fmars.2019.00065

Challenges and Prospects in Ocean Circulation Models. / Fox-Kemper, Baylor; Adcroft, Alistair; Böning, Claus W.; Chassignet, Eric P.; Curchitser, Enrique; Danabasoglu, Gokhan; Eden, Carsten; England, Matthew H.; Gerdes, Rüdiger; Greatbatch, Richard J.; Griffies, Stephen M.; Hallberg, Robert W.; Hanert, Emmanuel; Heimbach, Patrick; Hewitt, Helene T.; Hill, Christopher N.; Komuro, Yoshiki; Legg, Sonya; Le Sommer, Julien; Masina, Simona; Marsland, Simon J.; Penny, Stephen G.; Qiao, Fangli; Ringler, Todd D.; Treguier, Anne Marie; Tsujino, Hiroyuki; Uotila, Petteri; Yeager, Stephen G.

I: Frontiers in Marine Science, Vol. 6, 65, 26.02.2019.

Forskningsoutput: TidskriftsbidragÖversiktsartikelVetenskapligPeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Challenges and Prospects in Ocean Circulation Models

AU - Fox-Kemper, Baylor

AU - Adcroft, Alistair

AU - Böning, Claus W.

AU - Chassignet, Eric P.

AU - Curchitser, Enrique

AU - Danabasoglu, Gokhan

AU - Eden, Carsten

AU - England, Matthew H.

AU - Gerdes, Rüdiger

AU - Greatbatch, Richard J.

AU - Griffies, Stephen M.

AU - Hallberg, Robert W.

AU - Hanert, Emmanuel

AU - Heimbach, Patrick

AU - Hewitt, Helene T.

AU - Hill, Christopher N.

AU - Komuro, Yoshiki

AU - Legg, Sonya

AU - Le Sommer, Julien

AU - Masina, Simona

AU - Marsland, Simon J.

AU - Penny, Stephen G.

AU - Qiao, Fangli

AU - Ringler, Todd D.

AU - Treguier, Anne Marie

AU - Tsujino, Hiroyuki

AU - Uotila, Petteri

AU - Yeager, Stephen G.

PY - 2019/2/26

Y1 - 2019/2/26

N2 - We revisit the challenges and prospects for ocean circulation models following Griffies et al. (2010). Over the past decade, ocean circulation models evolved through improved understanding, numerics, spatial discretization, grid configurations, parameterizations, data assimilation, environmental monitoring, and process-level observations and modeling. Important large scale applications over the last decade are simulations of the Southern Ocean, the Meridional Overturning Circulation and its variability, and regional sea level change. Submesoscale variability is now routinely resolved in process models and permitted in a few global models, and submesoscale effects are parameterized in most global models. The scales where nonhydrostatic effects become important are beginning to be resolved in regional and process models. Coupling to sea ice, ice shelves, and high-resolution atmospheric models has stimulated new ideas and driven improvements in numerics. Observations have provided insight into turbulence and mixing around the globe and assessed through perturbed physics models. Relatedly, parameterizations of the mixing and overturning processes in boundary layers and the ocean interior have improved. New diagnostics being used for evaluating models alongside present and novel observations are briefly referenced. The overall goal is summarizing new developments in ocean modeling, including: how new and existing observations can be used, what modeling challenges remain, and how simulations can be used to support observations.

AB - We revisit the challenges and prospects for ocean circulation models following Griffies et al. (2010). Over the past decade, ocean circulation models evolved through improved understanding, numerics, spatial discretization, grid configurations, parameterizations, data assimilation, environmental monitoring, and process-level observations and modeling. Important large scale applications over the last decade are simulations of the Southern Ocean, the Meridional Overturning Circulation and its variability, and regional sea level change. Submesoscale variability is now routinely resolved in process models and permitted in a few global models, and submesoscale effects are parameterized in most global models. The scales where nonhydrostatic effects become important are beginning to be resolved in regional and process models. Coupling to sea ice, ice shelves, and high-resolution atmospheric models has stimulated new ideas and driven improvements in numerics. Observations have provided insight into turbulence and mixing around the globe and assessed through perturbed physics models. Relatedly, parameterizations of the mixing and overturning processes in boundary layers and the ocean interior have improved. New diagnostics being used for evaluating models alongside present and novel observations are briefly referenced. The overall goal is summarizing new developments in ocean modeling, including: how new and existing observations can be used, what modeling challenges remain, and how simulations can be used to support observations.

KW - 1171 Geosciences

U2 - 10.3389/fmars.2019.00065

DO - 10.3389/fmars.2019.00065

M3 - Review Article

VL - 6

JO - Frontiers in Marine Science

JF - Frontiers in Marine Science

SN - 2296-7745

M1 - 65

ER -

Fox-Kemper B, Adcroft A, Böning CW, Chassignet EP, Curchitser E, Danabasoglu G et al. Challenges and Prospects in Ocean Circulation Models. Frontiers in Marine Science. 2019 feb 26;6. 65. https://doi.org/10.3389/fmars.2019.00065