Crowding-In: How Indian Civil Society Organizations Began Mobilizing around Climate Change

Matti Tuomas Ylä-Anttila, Pradip Swarnakar

Forskningsoutput: TidskriftsbidragArtikelVetenskapligPeer review

Sammanfattning

This paper argues that periodic waves of crowding in to ‘hot’ issue fields in are a recurring feature of how globally networked civil society organizations (CSOs) operate, especially in countries of the Global South. We elaborate on this argument through a study of Indian CSO mobilization around climate change. Five key mechanisms contribute to crowding in processes: (1) the expansion of discursive opportunities, (2) the event effects of global institutional conferences, (3) the network effects created by expanding global CSO networks, (4) the adoption and innovation of action repertoires and (5) global pressure effects creating new opportunities for CSOs. Our findings contribute to the world society literature, with an account of the mechanisms through which global institutions and political events affect national CSOs, and to the social movements literature by showing that developments in world society are essential contributors to national mobilization processes.
Originalspråkengelska
TidskriftBritish Journal of Sociology
Volym68
Utgåva2
Sidor (från-till)273-292
Antal sidor20
ISSN0007-1315
DOI
StatusPublicerad - 2017
MoE-publikationstypA1 Tidskriftsartikel-refererad

Vetenskapsgrenar

  • 5141 Sociologi

Citera det här

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Crowding-In : How Indian Civil Society Organizations Began Mobilizing around Climate Change. / Ylä-Anttila, Matti Tuomas; Swarnakar, Pradip.

I: British Journal of Sociology, Vol. 68 , Nr. 2, 2017, s. 273-292.

Forskningsoutput: TidskriftsbidragArtikelVetenskapligPeer review

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