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Aims Low-carbohydrate diet (LCD) has gained interest among individuals with diabetes as a means to manage glycaemia. We investigated the adherence to LCD in the Finnish Diabetic Nephropathy Study and whether carbohydrate restriction is associated with cardio-metabolic risk factors. Methods Cross-sectional data were available from 902 individuals with type 1 diabetes (44% men, age 47±13 years). Dietary data were collected twice with a 3-day diet record. Mean of the measurements was used. Carbohydrate intake 253 g/day or >48 E%). In the whole population, carbohydrate-to-fat ratio was calculated and its association with health variables was investigated. Results Higher carbohydrate-to-fat ratio was associated with higher blood glucose variability, higher blood pressure, lower HDL cholesterol concentration, and in men with lower waist-to-hip ratio. LCD adherence (n=69) was associated with lower BMI (25.6 vs. 27.8 kg/m2, p=0.030), lower variability of blood glucose measurements (0.38 vs. 0.45 mmol/l, p=0.030), and lower diastolic blood pressure (74 vs. 79 mmHg, p=0.048). Men reporting LCD had higher total (5.1 vs. 4.0 mmol/l, p=0.007) and non-HDL cholesterol (3.4 vs. 2.7 mmol/l, p=0.021). Women with LCD had higher HDL-cholesterol concentration (1.9 vs. 1.5 mmol/l, p=0.014). Conclusions Reduced blood glucose variability, related to LCD, could have clinical relevance to individuals with type 1 diabetes.
Originalspråkengelska
TidskriftDiabetes Research and Clinical Practice
ISSN0168-8227
DOI
StatusPublicerad - 16 aug 2019
MoE-publikationstypA1 Tidskriftsartikel-refererad

Vetenskapsgrenar

  • 3121 Inre medicin

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title = "Dietary carbohydrate intake and cardio-metabolic risk factors in type 1 diabetes",
abstract = "Aims Low-carbohydrate diet (LCD) has gained interest among individuals with diabetes as a means to manage glycaemia. We investigated the adherence to LCD in the Finnish Diabetic Nephropathy Study and whether carbohydrate restriction is associated with cardio-metabolic risk factors. Methods Cross-sectional data were available from 902 individuals with type 1 diabetes (44{\%} men, age 47±13 years). Dietary data were collected twice with a 3-day diet record. Mean of the measurements was used. Carbohydrate intake 253 g/day or >48 E{\%}). In the whole population, carbohydrate-to-fat ratio was calculated and its association with health variables was investigated. Results Higher carbohydrate-to-fat ratio was associated with higher blood glucose variability, higher blood pressure, lower HDL cholesterol concentration, and in men with lower waist-to-hip ratio. LCD adherence (n=69) was associated with lower BMI (25.6 vs. 27.8 kg/m2, p=0.030), lower variability of blood glucose measurements (0.38 vs. 0.45 mmol/l, p=0.030), and lower diastolic blood pressure (74 vs. 79 mmHg, p=0.048). Men reporting LCD had higher total (5.1 vs. 4.0 mmol/l, p=0.007) and non-HDL cholesterol (3.4 vs. 2.7 mmol/l, p=0.021). Women with LCD had higher HDL-cholesterol concentration (1.9 vs. 1.5 mmol/l, p=0.014). Conclusions Reduced blood glucose variability, related to LCD, could have clinical relevance to individuals with type 1 diabetes.",
keywords = "Cardio-metabolic risk factors, Glycaemic control, Low-carbohydrate diet, Type 1 diabetes, 3121 Internal medicine",
author = "Ahola, {Aila J.} and Carol Forsblom and Valma Harjutsalo and Per-Henrik Groop",
year = "2019",
month = "8",
day = "16",
doi = "10.1016/j.diabres.2019.107818",
language = "English",
journal = "Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice",
issn = "0168-8227",
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T1 - Dietary carbohydrate intake and cardio-metabolic risk factors in type 1 diabetes

AU - Ahola, Aila J.

AU - Forsblom, Carol

AU - Harjutsalo, Valma

AU - Groop, Per-Henrik

PY - 2019/8/16

Y1 - 2019/8/16

N2 - Aims Low-carbohydrate diet (LCD) has gained interest among individuals with diabetes as a means to manage glycaemia. We investigated the adherence to LCD in the Finnish Diabetic Nephropathy Study and whether carbohydrate restriction is associated with cardio-metabolic risk factors. Methods Cross-sectional data were available from 902 individuals with type 1 diabetes (44% men, age 47±13 years). Dietary data were collected twice with a 3-day diet record. Mean of the measurements was used. Carbohydrate intake 253 g/day or >48 E%). In the whole population, carbohydrate-to-fat ratio was calculated and its association with health variables was investigated. Results Higher carbohydrate-to-fat ratio was associated with higher blood glucose variability, higher blood pressure, lower HDL cholesterol concentration, and in men with lower waist-to-hip ratio. LCD adherence (n=69) was associated with lower BMI (25.6 vs. 27.8 kg/m2, p=0.030), lower variability of blood glucose measurements (0.38 vs. 0.45 mmol/l, p=0.030), and lower diastolic blood pressure (74 vs. 79 mmHg, p=0.048). Men reporting LCD had higher total (5.1 vs. 4.0 mmol/l, p=0.007) and non-HDL cholesterol (3.4 vs. 2.7 mmol/l, p=0.021). Women with LCD had higher HDL-cholesterol concentration (1.9 vs. 1.5 mmol/l, p=0.014). Conclusions Reduced blood glucose variability, related to LCD, could have clinical relevance to individuals with type 1 diabetes.

AB - Aims Low-carbohydrate diet (LCD) has gained interest among individuals with diabetes as a means to manage glycaemia. We investigated the adherence to LCD in the Finnish Diabetic Nephropathy Study and whether carbohydrate restriction is associated with cardio-metabolic risk factors. Methods Cross-sectional data were available from 902 individuals with type 1 diabetes (44% men, age 47±13 years). Dietary data were collected twice with a 3-day diet record. Mean of the measurements was used. Carbohydrate intake 253 g/day or >48 E%). In the whole population, carbohydrate-to-fat ratio was calculated and its association with health variables was investigated. Results Higher carbohydrate-to-fat ratio was associated with higher blood glucose variability, higher blood pressure, lower HDL cholesterol concentration, and in men with lower waist-to-hip ratio. LCD adherence (n=69) was associated with lower BMI (25.6 vs. 27.8 kg/m2, p=0.030), lower variability of blood glucose measurements (0.38 vs. 0.45 mmol/l, p=0.030), and lower diastolic blood pressure (74 vs. 79 mmHg, p=0.048). Men reporting LCD had higher total (5.1 vs. 4.0 mmol/l, p=0.007) and non-HDL cholesterol (3.4 vs. 2.7 mmol/l, p=0.021). Women with LCD had higher HDL-cholesterol concentration (1.9 vs. 1.5 mmol/l, p=0.014). Conclusions Reduced blood glucose variability, related to LCD, could have clinical relevance to individuals with type 1 diabetes.

KW - Cardio-metabolic risk factors

KW - Glycaemic control

KW - Low-carbohydrate diet

KW - Type 1 diabetes

KW - 3121 Internal medicine

U2 - 10.1016/j.diabres.2019.107818

DO - 10.1016/j.diabres.2019.107818

M3 - Article

JO - Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice

JF - Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice

SN - 0168-8227

ER -