Direct observation of vacuum arc evolution with nanosecond resolution

Zhipeng Zhou, Andreas Kyritsakis, Zhenxing Wang, Yi Li, Yingsan Geng, Flyura Djurabekova

Forskningsoutput: TidskriftsbidragArtikelVetenskapligPeer review

Sammanfattning

Sufficiently high voltage applied between two metal electrodes, even in ultra high vacuum conditions, results in an inevitable discharge that lights up the entire gap, opening a conductive channel through the vacuum and parasitically consuming large amounts of energy. Despite many efforts to understand the processes that lead to this phenomenon, known as vacuum arc, there is still no consensus regarding the role of each electrode in the evolution of such a momentous process as lightning. Employing a high-speed camera, we capture the entire lightning process step-by-step with a nanosecond resolution and find which of the two electrodes holds the main responsibility for igniting the arc. The light that gradually expands from the positively charged electrode (anode), often is assumed to play the main role in the formation of a vacuum arc. However, both the nanosecond-resolution images of vacuum arc evolution and the corresponding theoretical calculations agree that the conductive channel between the electrodes is built in the form of cathodic plasma long before any significant activity develops in the anode. We show evidently that the anode illumination is weaker and plays a minor role in igniting and maintaining the conductive channel.
Originalspråkengelska
Artikelnummer7814
TidskriftScientific Reports
Volym9
Antal sidor12
ISSN2045-2322
DOI
StatusPublicerad - 24 maj 2019
MoE-publikationstypA1 Tidskriftsartikel-refererad

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  • 114 Fysik

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title = "Direct observation of vacuum arc evolution with nanosecond resolution",
abstract = "Sufficiently high voltage applied between two metal electrodes, even in ultra high vacuum conditions, results in an inevitable discharge that lights up the entire gap, opening a conductive channel through the vacuum and parasitically consuming large amounts of energy. Despite many efforts to understand the processes that lead to this phenomenon, known as vacuum arc, there is still no consensus regarding the role of each electrode in the evolution of such a momentous process as lightning. Employing a high-speed camera, we capture the entire lightning process step-by-step with a nanosecond resolution and find which of the two electrodes holds the main responsibility for igniting the arc. The light that gradually expands from the positively charged electrode (anode), often is assumed to play the main role in the formation of a vacuum arc. However, both the nanosecond-resolution images of vacuum arc evolution and the corresponding theoretical calculations agree that the conductive channel between the electrodes is built in the form of cathodic plasma long before any significant activity develops in the anode. We show evidently that the anode illumination is weaker and plays a minor role in igniting and maintaining the conductive channel.",
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author = "Zhipeng Zhou and Andreas Kyritsakis and Zhenxing Wang and Yi Li and Yingsan Geng and Flyura Djurabekova",
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Direct observation of vacuum arc evolution with nanosecond resolution. / Zhou, Zhipeng; Kyritsakis, Andreas; Wang, Zhenxing; Li, Yi; Geng, Yingsan; Djurabekova, Flyura.

I: Scientific Reports, Vol. 9, 7814, 24.05.2019.

Forskningsoutput: TidskriftsbidragArtikelVetenskapligPeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Direct observation of vacuum arc evolution with nanosecond resolution

AU - Zhou, Zhipeng

AU - Kyritsakis, Andreas

AU - Wang, Zhenxing

AU - Li, Yi

AU - Geng, Yingsan

AU - Djurabekova, Flyura

PY - 2019/5/24

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N2 - Sufficiently high voltage applied between two metal electrodes, even in ultra high vacuum conditions, results in an inevitable discharge that lights up the entire gap, opening a conductive channel through the vacuum and parasitically consuming large amounts of energy. Despite many efforts to understand the processes that lead to this phenomenon, known as vacuum arc, there is still no consensus regarding the role of each electrode in the evolution of such a momentous process as lightning. Employing a high-speed camera, we capture the entire lightning process step-by-step with a nanosecond resolution and find which of the two electrodes holds the main responsibility for igniting the arc. The light that gradually expands from the positively charged electrode (anode), often is assumed to play the main role in the formation of a vacuum arc. However, both the nanosecond-resolution images of vacuum arc evolution and the corresponding theoretical calculations agree that the conductive channel between the electrodes is built in the form of cathodic plasma long before any significant activity develops in the anode. We show evidently that the anode illumination is weaker and plays a minor role in igniting and maintaining the conductive channel.

AB - Sufficiently high voltage applied between two metal electrodes, even in ultra high vacuum conditions, results in an inevitable discharge that lights up the entire gap, opening a conductive channel through the vacuum and parasitically consuming large amounts of energy. Despite many efforts to understand the processes that lead to this phenomenon, known as vacuum arc, there is still no consensus regarding the role of each electrode in the evolution of such a momentous process as lightning. Employing a high-speed camera, we capture the entire lightning process step-by-step with a nanosecond resolution and find which of the two electrodes holds the main responsibility for igniting the arc. The light that gradually expands from the positively charged electrode (anode), often is assumed to play the main role in the formation of a vacuum arc. However, both the nanosecond-resolution images of vacuum arc evolution and the corresponding theoretical calculations agree that the conductive channel between the electrodes is built in the form of cathodic plasma long before any significant activity develops in the anode. We show evidently that the anode illumination is weaker and plays a minor role in igniting and maintaining the conductive channel.

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KW - COPPER

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