Environmental analysis: Atmospheric samples

Forskningsoutput: Kapitel i bok/rapport/konferenshandlingKapitelVetenskapligPeer review

Sammanfattning

Atmospheric aerosol particles that can be natural or anthropogenic, are defined as a suspension of fine solid or liquid particles in air. They are either emitted or formed in the atmosphere and their particle size affects their transport and deposition. Their most important impacts, such as respiratory health hazards, visibility reduction, and climate effects are dependent upon the particle size that ranges from a few nanometers to a few hundred micrometers. Chemical composition of aerosol particles is generally determined by gas- and liquid-chromatographic techniques, mostly with mass spectrometric detection. Due to the recently recognized importance of highly oxidized compounds in aerosol formation and growth, improved separation efficiency of the columns, and high-resolution mass spectrometric detection, use of liquid chromatography (LC) has increased in atmospheric analysis. Reversed-phase LC with different modifications is still the mostly used separation technique, but ion exchange and hydrophilic interaction LC are increasingly utilized.
Originalspråkengelska
Titel på gästpublikationLiquid Chromatography : Applications
RedaktörerSalvatore Fanali, Paul R. Haddad, Colin F. Poole, Marja-Liisa Riekkola
Antal sidor30
Volym2
UtgivningsortAmsterdam
FörlagElsevier
Utgivningsdatum25 jun 2017
Utgåva2nd
Sidor769-798
ISBN (tryckt)978-0-12-805392-8
ISBN (elektroniskt)978-0-12-809344-3
DOI
StatusPublicerad - 25 jun 2017
MoE-publikationstypA3 Del av bok eller annan forskningsbok

Publikationsserier

NamnHandbooks in separation science
FörlagElsevier

Vetenskapsgrenar

  • 116 Kemi

Citera det här

Parshintsev, E., Hartonen, K. M., & Riekkola, M-L. (2017). Environmental analysis: Atmospheric samples. I S. Fanali, P. R. Haddad, C. F. Poole, & M-L. Riekkola (Red.), Liquid Chromatography: Applications (2nd red., Vol. 2, s. 769-798). (Handbooks in separation science). Amsterdam: Elsevier. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-805392-8.00024-4
Parshintsev, Evgeny ; Hartonen, Kari Mikael ; Riekkola, Marja-Liisa. / Environmental analysis : Atmospheric samples. Liquid Chromatography: Applications. redaktör / Salvatore Fanali ; Paul R. Haddad ; Colin F. Poole ; Marja-Liisa Riekkola. Vol. 2 2nd. red. Amsterdam : Elsevier, 2017. s. 769-798 (Handbooks in separation science).
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abstract = "Atmospheric aerosol particles that can be natural or anthropogenic, are defined as a suspension of fine solid or liquid particles in air. They are either emitted or formed in the atmosphere and their particle size affects their transport and deposition. Their most important impacts, such as respiratory health hazards, visibility reduction, and climate effects are dependent upon the particle size that ranges from a few nanometers to a few hundred micrometers. Chemical composition of aerosol particles is generally determined by gas- and liquid-chromatographic techniques, mostly with mass spectrometric detection. Due to the recently recognized importance of highly oxidized compounds in aerosol formation and growth, improved separation efficiency of the columns, and high-resolution mass spectrometric detection, use of liquid chromatography (LC) has increased in atmospheric analysis. Reversed-phase LC with different modifications is still the mostly used separation technique, but ion exchange and hydrophilic interaction LC are increasingly utilized.",
keywords = "116 Chemical sciences, Atmospheric aerosols, On-line, Off-line, On-site, Carboxylic acids, Amino acids, Organosulfates, Amines, Aldehydes, Sugars, Lipids, PAHs",
author = "Evgeny Parshintsev and Hartonen, {Kari Mikael} and Marja-Liisa Riekkola",
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Parshintsev, E, Hartonen, KM & Riekkola, M-L 2017, Environmental analysis: Atmospheric samples. i S Fanali, PR Haddad, CF Poole & M-L Riekkola (red), Liquid Chromatography: Applications. 2nd uppl, vol. 2, Handbooks in separation science, Elsevier, Amsterdam, s. 769-798. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-805392-8.00024-4

Environmental analysis : Atmospheric samples. / Parshintsev, Evgeny; Hartonen, Kari Mikael; Riekkola, Marja-Liisa.

Liquid Chromatography: Applications. red. / Salvatore Fanali; Paul R. Haddad; Colin F. Poole; Marja-Liisa Riekkola. Vol. 2 2nd. red. Amsterdam : Elsevier, 2017. s. 769-798 (Handbooks in separation science).

Forskningsoutput: Kapitel i bok/rapport/konferenshandlingKapitelVetenskapligPeer review

TY - CHAP

T1 - Environmental analysis

T2 - Atmospheric samples

AU - Parshintsev, Evgeny

AU - Hartonen, Kari Mikael

AU - Riekkola, Marja-Liisa

PY - 2017/6/25

Y1 - 2017/6/25

N2 - Atmospheric aerosol particles that can be natural or anthropogenic, are defined as a suspension of fine solid or liquid particles in air. They are either emitted or formed in the atmosphere and their particle size affects their transport and deposition. Their most important impacts, such as respiratory health hazards, visibility reduction, and climate effects are dependent upon the particle size that ranges from a few nanometers to a few hundred micrometers. Chemical composition of aerosol particles is generally determined by gas- and liquid-chromatographic techniques, mostly with mass spectrometric detection. Due to the recently recognized importance of highly oxidized compounds in aerosol formation and growth, improved separation efficiency of the columns, and high-resolution mass spectrometric detection, use of liquid chromatography (LC) has increased in atmospheric analysis. Reversed-phase LC with different modifications is still the mostly used separation technique, but ion exchange and hydrophilic interaction LC are increasingly utilized.

AB - Atmospheric aerosol particles that can be natural or anthropogenic, are defined as a suspension of fine solid or liquid particles in air. They are either emitted or formed in the atmosphere and their particle size affects their transport and deposition. Their most important impacts, such as respiratory health hazards, visibility reduction, and climate effects are dependent upon the particle size that ranges from a few nanometers to a few hundred micrometers. Chemical composition of aerosol particles is generally determined by gas- and liquid-chromatographic techniques, mostly with mass spectrometric detection. Due to the recently recognized importance of highly oxidized compounds in aerosol formation and growth, improved separation efficiency of the columns, and high-resolution mass spectrometric detection, use of liquid chromatography (LC) has increased in atmospheric analysis. Reversed-phase LC with different modifications is still the mostly used separation technique, but ion exchange and hydrophilic interaction LC are increasingly utilized.

KW - 116 Chemical sciences

KW - Atmospheric aerosols

KW - On-line

KW - Off-line

KW - On-site

KW - Carboxylic acids

KW - Amino acids

KW - Organosulfates

KW - Amines

KW - Aldehydes

KW - Sugars

KW - Lipids

KW - PAHs

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DO - 10.1016/B978-0-12-805392-8.00024-4

M3 - Chapter

SN - 978-0-12-805392-8

VL - 2

T3 - Handbooks in separation science

SP - 769

EP - 798

BT - Liquid Chromatography

A2 - Fanali, Salvatore

A2 - Haddad, Paul R.

A2 - Poole, Colin F.

A2 - Riekkola, Marja-Liisa

PB - Elsevier

CY - Amsterdam

ER -

Parshintsev E, Hartonen KM, Riekkola M-L. Environmental analysis: Atmospheric samples. I Fanali S, Haddad PR, Poole CF, Riekkola M-L, redaktörer, Liquid Chromatography: Applications. 2nd red. Vol. 2. Amsterdam: Elsevier. 2017. s. 769-798. (Handbooks in separation science). https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-805392-8.00024-4