Functional properties of human auditory cortical fields

David L. Woods, Timothy J. Herron, Anthony D. Cate, E. William Yund, G. Christopher Stecker, Teemu Rinne, Xiaojian Kang

Forskningsoutput: TidskriftsbidragArtikelVetenskapligPeer review

Sammanfattning

While auditory cortex in non-human primates has been subdivided into multiple functionally-specialized auditory cortical fields (ACFs), the boundaries and functional specialization of human ACFs have not been defined. In the current study, we evaluated whether a widely accepted primate model of auditory cortex could explain regional tuning properties of fMRI activations on the cortical surface to attended and nonattended tones of different frequency, location, and intensity. The limits of auditory cortex were defined by voxels that showed significant activations to nonattended sounds. Three centrally-located fields with mirror-symmetric tonotopic organization were identified and assigned to the three core fields of the primate model while surrounding activations were assigned to belt fields following procedures similar to those used in macaque fMRI studies. The functional properties of core, medial belt, and lateral belt field groups were then analyzed. Field groups were distinguished by tonotopic organization, frequency selectivity, intensity sensitivity, contralaterality, binaural enhancement, attentional modulation, and hemispheric asymmetry. In general, core fields showed greater sensitivity to sound properties than did belt fields, while belt fields showed greater attentional modulation than core fields. Significant distinctions in intensity sensitivity and contralaterality were seen between adjacent core fields A1 and R, while multiple differences in tuning properties were evident at boundaries between adjacent core and belt fields. The reliable differences in functional properties between fields and field groups suggest that the basic primate pattern of auditory cortex organization is preserved in humans. A comparison of the sizes of functionally-defined ACFs in humans and macaques reveals a significant relative expansion in human lateral belt fields implicated in the processing of speech.
Bidragets titel på inmatningsspråkFunctional properties of human auditory cortical fields
Originalspråkengelska
TidskriftFrontiers in Systems Neuroscience
Volym4
Utgåva155
Sidor (från-till)1-13
Antal sidor13
ISSN1662-5137
DOI
StatusPublicerad - 2010
MoE-publikationstypA1 Tidskriftsartikel-refererad

Vetenskapsgrenar

  • 515 Psykologi

Citera det här

Woods, D. L., Herron, T. J., Cate, A. D., Yund, E. W., Stecker, G. C., Rinne, T., & Kang, X. (2010). Functional properties of human auditory cortical fields. Frontiers in Systems Neuroscience, 4(155), 1-13. https://doi.org/10.3389/fnsys.2010.00155
Woods, David L. ; Herron, Timothy J. ; Cate, Anthony D. ; Yund, E. William ; Stecker, G. Christopher ; Rinne, Teemu ; Kang, Xiaojian. / Functional properties of human auditory cortical fields. I: Frontiers in Systems Neuroscience. 2010 ; Vol. 4, Nr. 155. s. 1-13.
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title = "Functional properties of human auditory cortical fields",
abstract = "While auditory cortex in non-human primates has been subdivided into multiple functionally-specialized auditory cortical fields (ACFs), the boundaries and functional specialization of human ACFs have not been defined. In the current study, we evaluated whether a widely accepted primate model of auditory cortex could explain regional tuning properties of fMRI activations on the cortical surface to attended and nonattended tones of different frequency, location, and intensity. The limits of auditory cortex were defined by voxels that showed significant activations to nonattended sounds. Three centrally-located fields with mirror-symmetric tonotopic organization were identified and assigned to the three core fields of the primate model while surrounding activations were assigned to belt fields following procedures similar to those used in macaque fMRI studies. The functional properties of core, medial belt, and lateral belt field groups were then analyzed. Field groups were distinguished by tonotopic organization, frequency selectivity, intensity sensitivity, contralaterality, binaural enhancement, attentional modulation, and hemispheric asymmetry. In general, core fields showed greater sensitivity to sound properties than did belt fields, while belt fields showed greater attentional modulation than core fields. Significant distinctions in intensity sensitivity and contralaterality were seen between adjacent core fields A1 and R, while multiple differences in tuning properties were evident at boundaries between adjacent core and belt fields. The reliable differences in functional properties between fields and field groups suggest that the basic primate pattern of auditory cortex organization is preserved in humans. A comparison of the sizes of functionally-defined ACFs in humans and macaques reveals a significant relative expansion in human lateral belt fields implicated in the processing of speech.",
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author = "Woods, {David L.} and Herron, {Timothy J.} and Cate, {Anthony D.} and Yund, {E. William} and Stecker, {G. Christopher} and Teemu Rinne and Xiaojian Kang",
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Woods, DL, Herron, TJ, Cate, AD, Yund, EW, Stecker, GC, Rinne, T & Kang, X 2010, 'Functional properties of human auditory cortical fields' Frontiers in Systems Neuroscience, vol. 4, nr. 155, s. 1-13. https://doi.org/10.3389/fnsys.2010.00155

Functional properties of human auditory cortical fields. / Woods, David L.; Herron, Timothy J.; Cate, Anthony D.; Yund, E. William; Stecker, G. Christopher; Rinne, Teemu; Kang, Xiaojian.

I: Frontiers in Systems Neuroscience, Vol. 4, Nr. 155, 2010, s. 1-13.

Forskningsoutput: TidskriftsbidragArtikelVetenskapligPeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Functional properties of human auditory cortical fields

AU - Woods, David L.

AU - Herron, Timothy J.

AU - Cate, Anthony D.

AU - Yund, E. William

AU - Stecker, G. Christopher

AU - Rinne, Teemu

AU - Kang, Xiaojian

N1 - 2010-December-15 Original Research Human auditory fields English Volume: Proceeding volume:

PY - 2010

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N2 - While auditory cortex in non-human primates has been subdivided into multiple functionally-specialized auditory cortical fields (ACFs), the boundaries and functional specialization of human ACFs have not been defined. In the current study, we evaluated whether a widely accepted primate model of auditory cortex could explain regional tuning properties of fMRI activations on the cortical surface to attended and nonattended tones of different frequency, location, and intensity. The limits of auditory cortex were defined by voxels that showed significant activations to nonattended sounds. Three centrally-located fields with mirror-symmetric tonotopic organization were identified and assigned to the three core fields of the primate model while surrounding activations were assigned to belt fields following procedures similar to those used in macaque fMRI studies. The functional properties of core, medial belt, and lateral belt field groups were then analyzed. Field groups were distinguished by tonotopic organization, frequency selectivity, intensity sensitivity, contralaterality, binaural enhancement, attentional modulation, and hemispheric asymmetry. In general, core fields showed greater sensitivity to sound properties than did belt fields, while belt fields showed greater attentional modulation than core fields. Significant distinctions in intensity sensitivity and contralaterality were seen between adjacent core fields A1 and R, while multiple differences in tuning properties were evident at boundaries between adjacent core and belt fields. The reliable differences in functional properties between fields and field groups suggest that the basic primate pattern of auditory cortex organization is preserved in humans. A comparison of the sizes of functionally-defined ACFs in humans and macaques reveals a significant relative expansion in human lateral belt fields implicated in the processing of speech.

AB - While auditory cortex in non-human primates has been subdivided into multiple functionally-specialized auditory cortical fields (ACFs), the boundaries and functional specialization of human ACFs have not been defined. In the current study, we evaluated whether a widely accepted primate model of auditory cortex could explain regional tuning properties of fMRI activations on the cortical surface to attended and nonattended tones of different frequency, location, and intensity. The limits of auditory cortex were defined by voxels that showed significant activations to nonattended sounds. Three centrally-located fields with mirror-symmetric tonotopic organization were identified and assigned to the three core fields of the primate model while surrounding activations were assigned to belt fields following procedures similar to those used in macaque fMRI studies. The functional properties of core, medial belt, and lateral belt field groups were then analyzed. Field groups were distinguished by tonotopic organization, frequency selectivity, intensity sensitivity, contralaterality, binaural enhancement, attentional modulation, and hemispheric asymmetry. In general, core fields showed greater sensitivity to sound properties than did belt fields, while belt fields showed greater attentional modulation than core fields. Significant distinctions in intensity sensitivity and contralaterality were seen between adjacent core fields A1 and R, while multiple differences in tuning properties were evident at boundaries between adjacent core and belt fields. The reliable differences in functional properties between fields and field groups suggest that the basic primate pattern of auditory cortex organization is preserved in humans. A comparison of the sizes of functionally-defined ACFs in humans and macaques reveals a significant relative expansion in human lateral belt fields implicated in the processing of speech.

KW - 515 Psychology

KW - tones

KW - tonotopy

KW - cortical mapping

KW - primate

KW - attention

KW - sound intensity

KW - sound location

KW - fMRI

U2 - 10.3389/fnsys.2010.00155

DO - 10.3389/fnsys.2010.00155

M3 - Article

VL - 4

SP - 1

EP - 13

JO - Frontiers in Systems Neuroscience

JF - Frontiers in Systems Neuroscience

SN - 1662-5137

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ER -