Global patterns of domestic cannabis cultivation

Sample characteristics and patterns of growing across eleven countries

G.R. Potter, M.J. Barratt, A. Malm, M. Bouchard, T. Blok, A.-S. Christensen, T. Decorte, V.A. Frank, P. Hakkarainen, A. Klein, S. Lenton, J. Perälä, B. Werse, M. Wouters

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Sammanfattning

Aims: To provide an overview of: demographic characteristics; experiences with growing cannabis; methods and scale of growing operations; reasons for growing; personal use of cannabis and other drugs; participation in cannabis and other drug markets; contacts with the criminal justice system for respondents to an online survey about cannabis cultivation drawn from eleven countries (N=6530). Important similarities and differences between the national samples recruited will be discussed. Method: This paper utilizes data from the online web survey of predominantly 'small-scale' cannabis cultivators in eleven countries conducted by the Global Cannabis Cultivation Research Consortium (GCCRC). Here we focus primarily on descriptive statistics to highlight key similarities and differences across the different national samples. Findings: Overall there was a great deal of similarity across countries in terms of: demographic characteristics; experiences with growing cannabis; methods and scale of growing operations; reasons for growing; use of cannabis and other drugs; participation in cannabis and other drug markets, and contacts with the criminal justice system. In particular, we can recognise that a clear majority of those small-scale cannabis cultivators who responded to our survey is primarily motivated for reasons other than making money from cannabis supply and have minimal involvement in drug dealing or other criminal activities. These growers generally come from 'normal' rather than 'deviant' backgrounds. Some differences do exist between the samples drawn from different countries suggesting that local factors (political, geographical, cultural etc.) may have some influence on how small-scale cultivators operate, although differences in recruitment strategies in different countries may also account for some differences observed. © Springer Fachmedien Wiesbaden 2016.
Originalspråkengelska
Titel på gästpublikationFriendly business : International views on social supply, self-supply and small-scale drug dealing
RedaktörerBernd Werse, Christiane Bernard
FörlagSpringer Fachmedien Wiesbaden
Utgivningsdatum2016
Sidor163-196
ISBN (tryckt)9783658103286
ISBN (elektroniskt)978-3-658-10329-3
DOI
StatusPublicerad - 2016
MoE-publikationstypA3 Del av bok eller annan forskningsbok

Vetenskapsgrenar

  • 5141 Sociologi

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Potter, G. R., Barratt, M. J., Malm, A., Bouchard, M., Blok, T., Christensen, A-S., ... Wouters, M. (2016). Global patterns of domestic cannabis cultivation: Sample characteristics and patterns of growing across eleven countries. I B. Werse, & C. Bernard (Red.), Friendly business: International views on social supply, self-supply and small-scale drug dealing (s. 163-196). Springer Fachmedien Wiesbaden. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-658-10329-3_9
Potter, G.R. ; Barratt, M.J. ; Malm, A. ; Bouchard, M. ; Blok, T. ; Christensen, A.-S. ; Decorte, T. ; Frank, V.A. ; Hakkarainen, P. ; Klein, A. ; Lenton, S. ; Perälä, J. ; Werse, B. ; Wouters, M. / Global patterns of domestic cannabis cultivation : Sample characteristics and patterns of growing across eleven countries. Friendly business: International views on social supply, self-supply and small-scale drug dealing. redaktör / Bernd Werse ; Christiane Bernard. Springer Fachmedien Wiesbaden, 2016. s. 163-196
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abstract = "Aims: To provide an overview of: demographic characteristics; experiences with growing cannabis; methods and scale of growing operations; reasons for growing; personal use of cannabis and other drugs; participation in cannabis and other drug markets; contacts with the criminal justice system for respondents to an online survey about cannabis cultivation drawn from eleven countries (N=6530). Important similarities and differences between the national samples recruited will be discussed. Method: This paper utilizes data from the online web survey of predominantly 'small-scale' cannabis cultivators in eleven countries conducted by the Global Cannabis Cultivation Research Consortium (GCCRC). Here we focus primarily on descriptive statistics to highlight key similarities and differences across the different national samples. Findings: Overall there was a great deal of similarity across countries in terms of: demographic characteristics; experiences with growing cannabis; methods and scale of growing operations; reasons for growing; use of cannabis and other drugs; participation in cannabis and other drug markets, and contacts with the criminal justice system. In particular, we can recognise that a clear majority of those small-scale cannabis cultivators who responded to our survey is primarily motivated for reasons other than making money from cannabis supply and have minimal involvement in drug dealing or other criminal activities. These growers generally come from 'normal' rather than 'deviant' backgrounds. Some differences do exist between the samples drawn from different countries suggesting that local factors (political, geographical, cultural etc.) may have some influence on how small-scale cultivators operate, although differences in recruitment strategies in different countries may also account for some differences observed. {\circledC} Springer Fachmedien Wiesbaden 2016.",
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Potter, GR, Barratt, MJ, Malm, A, Bouchard, M, Blok, T, Christensen, A-S, Decorte, T, Frank, VA, Hakkarainen, P, Klein, A, Lenton, S, Perälä, J, Werse, B & Wouters, M 2016, Global patterns of domestic cannabis cultivation: Sample characteristics and patterns of growing across eleven countries. i B Werse & C Bernard (red), Friendly business: International views on social supply, self-supply and small-scale drug dealing. Springer Fachmedien Wiesbaden, s. 163-196. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-658-10329-3_9

Global patterns of domestic cannabis cultivation : Sample characteristics and patterns of growing across eleven countries. / Potter, G.R.; Barratt, M.J.; Malm, A.; Bouchard, M.; Blok, T.; Christensen, A.-S.; Decorte, T.; Frank, V.A.; Hakkarainen, P.; Klein, A.; Lenton, S.; Perälä, J.; Werse, B.; Wouters, M.

Friendly business: International views on social supply, self-supply and small-scale drug dealing. red. / Bernd Werse; Christiane Bernard. Springer Fachmedien Wiesbaden, 2016. s. 163-196.

Forskningsoutput: Kapitel i bok/rapport/konferenshandlingKapitelVetenskapligPeer review

TY - CHAP

T1 - Global patterns of domestic cannabis cultivation

T2 - Sample characteristics and patterns of growing across eleven countries

AU - Potter, G.R.

AU - Barratt, M.J.

AU - Malm, A.

AU - Bouchard, M.

AU - Blok, T.

AU - Christensen, A.-S.

AU - Decorte, T.

AU - Frank, V.A.

AU - Hakkarainen, P.

AU - Klein, A.

AU - Lenton, S.

AU - Perälä, J.

AU - Werse, B.

AU - Wouters, M.

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - Aims: To provide an overview of: demographic characteristics; experiences with growing cannabis; methods and scale of growing operations; reasons for growing; personal use of cannabis and other drugs; participation in cannabis and other drug markets; contacts with the criminal justice system for respondents to an online survey about cannabis cultivation drawn from eleven countries (N=6530). Important similarities and differences between the national samples recruited will be discussed. Method: This paper utilizes data from the online web survey of predominantly 'small-scale' cannabis cultivators in eleven countries conducted by the Global Cannabis Cultivation Research Consortium (GCCRC). Here we focus primarily on descriptive statistics to highlight key similarities and differences across the different national samples. Findings: Overall there was a great deal of similarity across countries in terms of: demographic characteristics; experiences with growing cannabis; methods and scale of growing operations; reasons for growing; use of cannabis and other drugs; participation in cannabis and other drug markets, and contacts with the criminal justice system. In particular, we can recognise that a clear majority of those small-scale cannabis cultivators who responded to our survey is primarily motivated for reasons other than making money from cannabis supply and have minimal involvement in drug dealing or other criminal activities. These growers generally come from 'normal' rather than 'deviant' backgrounds. Some differences do exist between the samples drawn from different countries suggesting that local factors (political, geographical, cultural etc.) may have some influence on how small-scale cultivators operate, although differences in recruitment strategies in different countries may also account for some differences observed. © Springer Fachmedien Wiesbaden 2016.

AB - Aims: To provide an overview of: demographic characteristics; experiences with growing cannabis; methods and scale of growing operations; reasons for growing; personal use of cannabis and other drugs; participation in cannabis and other drug markets; contacts with the criminal justice system for respondents to an online survey about cannabis cultivation drawn from eleven countries (N=6530). Important similarities and differences between the national samples recruited will be discussed. Method: This paper utilizes data from the online web survey of predominantly 'small-scale' cannabis cultivators in eleven countries conducted by the Global Cannabis Cultivation Research Consortium (GCCRC). Here we focus primarily on descriptive statistics to highlight key similarities and differences across the different national samples. Findings: Overall there was a great deal of similarity across countries in terms of: demographic characteristics; experiences with growing cannabis; methods and scale of growing operations; reasons for growing; use of cannabis and other drugs; participation in cannabis and other drug markets, and contacts with the criminal justice system. In particular, we can recognise that a clear majority of those small-scale cannabis cultivators who responded to our survey is primarily motivated for reasons other than making money from cannabis supply and have minimal involvement in drug dealing or other criminal activities. These growers generally come from 'normal' rather than 'deviant' backgrounds. Some differences do exist between the samples drawn from different countries suggesting that local factors (political, geographical, cultural etc.) may have some influence on how small-scale cultivators operate, although differences in recruitment strategies in different countries may also account for some differences observed. © Springer Fachmedien Wiesbaden 2016.

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Potter GR, Barratt MJ, Malm A, Bouchard M, Blok T, Christensen A-S et al. Global patterns of domestic cannabis cultivation: Sample characteristics and patterns of growing across eleven countries. I Werse B, Bernard C, redaktörer, Friendly business: International views on social supply, self-supply and small-scale drug dealing. Springer Fachmedien Wiesbaden. 2016. s. 163-196 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-658-10329-3_9