Importance of Sequence and Timing in Parasite Coinfections

Anssi Karvonen, Jukka Jokela, Anna-Liisa Laine

Forskningsoutput: TidskriftsbidragÖversiktsartikelVetenskapligPeer review

Sammanfattning

Coinfections by multiple parasites predominate in the wild. Interactions between parasites can be antagonistic, neutral, or facilitative, and they can have significant implications for epidemiology, disease dynamics, and evolution of virulence. Coinfections commonly result from sequential exposure of hosts to different parasites. We argue that the sequential nature of coinfections is important for the consequences of infection in both natural and man-made environments. Coinfections accumulate during host lifespan, determining the structure of the parasite infracommunity. Interactions within the parasite community and their joint effect on the host individual potentially shape evolution of parasite life-history traits and transmission biology. Overall, sequential coinfections have the potential to change evolutionary and epidemiological outcomes of host-parasite interactions widely across plant and animal systems.

Originalspråkengelska
TidskriftTrends in Parasitology
Volym35
Utgåva2
Sidor (från-till)109-118
Antal sidor10
ISSN1471-4922
DOI
StatusPublicerad - feb 2019
MoE-publikationstypA2 Granska artikel i en vetenskaplig tidskrift

Vetenskapsgrenar

  • 1181 Ekologi, evolutionsbiologi

Citera det här

Karvonen, Anssi ; Jokela, Jukka ; Laine, Anna-Liisa. / Importance of Sequence and Timing in Parasite Coinfections. I: Trends in Parasitology. 2019 ; Vol. 35, Nr. 2. s. 109-118.
@article{905172627efb406fb4f8ddc66ea309c5,
title = "Importance of Sequence and Timing in Parasite Coinfections",
abstract = "Coinfections by multiple parasites predominate in the wild. Interactions between parasites can be antagonistic, neutral, or facilitative, and they can have significant implications for epidemiology, disease dynamics, and evolution of virulence. Coinfections commonly result from sequential exposure of hosts to different parasites. We argue that the sequential nature of coinfections is important for the consequences of infection in both natural and man-made environments. Coinfections accumulate during host lifespan, determining the structure of the parasite infracommunity. Interactions within the parasite community and their joint effect on the host individual potentially shape evolution of parasite life-history traits and transmission biology. Overall, sequential coinfections have the potential to change evolutionary and epidemiological outcomes of host-parasite interactions widely across plant and animal systems.",
keywords = "EVOLUTION, GENOTYPE INFECTIONS, MALARIA, MULTIPLE INFECTION, POPULATION-DYNAMICS, RESISTANCE, SPATIAL VARIATION, TRANSMISSION, VIRULENCE, WITHIN-HOST COMPETITION, 1181 Ecology, evolutionary biology",
author = "Anssi Karvonen and Jukka Jokela and Anna-Liisa Laine",
year = "2019",
month = "2",
doi = "10.1016/j.pt.2018.11.007",
language = "English",
volume = "35",
pages = "109--118",
journal = "Trends in Parasitology",
issn = "1471-4922",
publisher = "Elsevier Ltd.",
number = "2",

}

Importance of Sequence and Timing in Parasite Coinfections. / Karvonen, Anssi; Jokela, Jukka; Laine, Anna-Liisa.

I: Trends in Parasitology, Vol. 35, Nr. 2, 02.2019, s. 109-118.

Forskningsoutput: TidskriftsbidragÖversiktsartikelVetenskapligPeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Importance of Sequence and Timing in Parasite Coinfections

AU - Karvonen, Anssi

AU - Jokela, Jukka

AU - Laine, Anna-Liisa

PY - 2019/2

Y1 - 2019/2

N2 - Coinfections by multiple parasites predominate in the wild. Interactions between parasites can be antagonistic, neutral, or facilitative, and they can have significant implications for epidemiology, disease dynamics, and evolution of virulence. Coinfections commonly result from sequential exposure of hosts to different parasites. We argue that the sequential nature of coinfections is important for the consequences of infection in both natural and man-made environments. Coinfections accumulate during host lifespan, determining the structure of the parasite infracommunity. Interactions within the parasite community and their joint effect on the host individual potentially shape evolution of parasite life-history traits and transmission biology. Overall, sequential coinfections have the potential to change evolutionary and epidemiological outcomes of host-parasite interactions widely across plant and animal systems.

AB - Coinfections by multiple parasites predominate in the wild. Interactions between parasites can be antagonistic, neutral, or facilitative, and they can have significant implications for epidemiology, disease dynamics, and evolution of virulence. Coinfections commonly result from sequential exposure of hosts to different parasites. We argue that the sequential nature of coinfections is important for the consequences of infection in both natural and man-made environments. Coinfections accumulate during host lifespan, determining the structure of the parasite infracommunity. Interactions within the parasite community and their joint effect on the host individual potentially shape evolution of parasite life-history traits and transmission biology. Overall, sequential coinfections have the potential to change evolutionary and epidemiological outcomes of host-parasite interactions widely across plant and animal systems.

KW - EVOLUTION

KW - GENOTYPE INFECTIONS

KW - MALARIA

KW - MULTIPLE INFECTION

KW - POPULATION-DYNAMICS

KW - RESISTANCE

KW - SPATIAL VARIATION

KW - TRANSMISSION

KW - VIRULENCE

KW - WITHIN-HOST COMPETITION

KW - 1181 Ecology, evolutionary biology

U2 - 10.1016/j.pt.2018.11.007

DO - 10.1016/j.pt.2018.11.007

M3 - Review Article

VL - 35

SP - 109

EP - 118

JO - Trends in Parasitology

JF - Trends in Parasitology

SN - 1471-4922

IS - 2

ER -