Improving outgroup attitudes in schools: First steps toward a teacher‐led vicarious contact intervention

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Sammanfattning

Despite the urgent need for promoting positive intergroup relations in schools, research on intergroup relations is not systematically translated into
prejudice-reduction interventions. Although prejudice-reduction interventions in schools based on indirect contact have been conducted for decades, they
have all been carried out by researchers themselves. In a field experiment in Finland in autumn 2015, we tested for the first time a vicarious contact
prejudice-reduction intervention for its effectiveness among adolescents (N = 639) when implemented independently by school teachers instead of
researchers. In addition, we tested the extent to which the intervention’s effect depends on initial outgroup attitudes, previous direct outgroup contact
experiences, and gender, hypothesizing that the intervention improves outgroup attitudes particularly among adolescents with more negative prior attitudes
and less positive prior direct contact, and more among girls than among boys. We found an unanticipated overall deterioration in the outgroup attitudes
during intervention in both the experimental and control groups. However, attitudes seemed to deteriorate somewhat less in the experimental than in the
control group, and the intervention had a significant positive effect on outgroup attitudes in one experimental subgroup that needed it most: girls who had
negative rather than positive outgroup attitudes at the outset. We discuss our results in light of previous research and contextual particularities.
Originalspråkengelska
TidskriftScandinavian Journal of Psychology
Volym60
Utgåva1
Sidor (från-till)77-86
Antal sidor10
ISSN0036-5564
DOI
StatusPublicerad - feb 2019
MoE-publikationstypA1 Tidskriftsartikel-refererad

Vetenskapsgrenar

  • 5144 Socialpsykologi
  • 515 Psykologi

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title = "Improving outgroup attitudes in schools: First steps toward a teacher‐led vicarious contact intervention",
abstract = "Despite the urgent need for promoting positive intergroup relations in schools, research on intergroup relations is not systematically translated intoprejudice-reduction interventions. Although prejudice-reduction interventions in schools based on indirect contact have been conducted for decades, theyhave all been carried out by researchers themselves. In a field experiment in Finland in autumn 2015, we tested for the first time a vicarious contactprejudice-reduction intervention for its effectiveness among adolescents (N = 639) when implemented independently by school teachers instead ofresearchers. In addition, we tested the extent to which the intervention’s effect depends on initial outgroup attitudes, previous direct outgroup contactexperiences, and gender, hypothesizing that the intervention improves outgroup attitudes particularly among adolescents with more negative prior attitudesand less positive prior direct contact, and more among girls than among boys. We found an unanticipated overall deterioration in the outgroup attitudesduring intervention in both the experimental and control groups. However, attitudes seemed to deteriorate somewhat less in the experimental than in thecontrol group, and the intervention had a significant positive effect on outgroup attitudes in one experimental subgroup that needed it most: girls who hadnegative rather than positive outgroup attitudes at the outset. We discuss our results in light of previous research and contextual particularities.",
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author = "Karmela Liebkind and M{\"a}kinen, {Viivi M} and Inga Jasinskaja-Lahti and {Renvik (M{\"a}h{\"o}nen)}, {Tuuli Anna} and Erling Solheim",
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T1 - Improving outgroup attitudes in schools

T2 - First steps toward a teacher‐led vicarious contact intervention

AU - Liebkind, Karmela

AU - Mäkinen, Viivi M

AU - Jasinskaja-Lahti, Inga

AU - Renvik (Mähönen), Tuuli Anna

AU - Solheim, Erling

PY - 2019/2

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N2 - Despite the urgent need for promoting positive intergroup relations in schools, research on intergroup relations is not systematically translated intoprejudice-reduction interventions. Although prejudice-reduction interventions in schools based on indirect contact have been conducted for decades, theyhave all been carried out by researchers themselves. In a field experiment in Finland in autumn 2015, we tested for the first time a vicarious contactprejudice-reduction intervention for its effectiveness among adolescents (N = 639) when implemented independently by school teachers instead ofresearchers. In addition, we tested the extent to which the intervention’s effect depends on initial outgroup attitudes, previous direct outgroup contactexperiences, and gender, hypothesizing that the intervention improves outgroup attitudes particularly among adolescents with more negative prior attitudesand less positive prior direct contact, and more among girls than among boys. We found an unanticipated overall deterioration in the outgroup attitudesduring intervention in both the experimental and control groups. However, attitudes seemed to deteriorate somewhat less in the experimental than in thecontrol group, and the intervention had a significant positive effect on outgroup attitudes in one experimental subgroup that needed it most: girls who hadnegative rather than positive outgroup attitudes at the outset. We discuss our results in light of previous research and contextual particularities.

AB - Despite the urgent need for promoting positive intergroup relations in schools, research on intergroup relations is not systematically translated intoprejudice-reduction interventions. Although prejudice-reduction interventions in schools based on indirect contact have been conducted for decades, theyhave all been carried out by researchers themselves. In a field experiment in Finland in autumn 2015, we tested for the first time a vicarious contactprejudice-reduction intervention for its effectiveness among adolescents (N = 639) when implemented independently by school teachers instead ofresearchers. In addition, we tested the extent to which the intervention’s effect depends on initial outgroup attitudes, previous direct outgroup contactexperiences, and gender, hypothesizing that the intervention improves outgroup attitudes particularly among adolescents with more negative prior attitudesand less positive prior direct contact, and more among girls than among boys. We found an unanticipated overall deterioration in the outgroup attitudesduring intervention in both the experimental and control groups. However, attitudes seemed to deteriorate somewhat less in the experimental than in thecontrol group, and the intervention had a significant positive effect on outgroup attitudes in one experimental subgroup that needed it most: girls who hadnegative rather than positive outgroup attitudes at the outset. We discuss our results in light of previous research and contextual particularities.

KW - 5144 Social psychology

KW - 515 Psychology

KW - Adolescence

KW - gender

KW - outgroup attitudes

KW - prejudice-reduction

KW - teacher-led intervention

KW - vicarious contact

KW - CROSS-GROUP FRIENDSHIPS

KW - PREJUDICE-REDUCTION

KW - INTERGROUP CONTACT

KW - EXTENDED CONTACT

KW - BEHAVIOR

KW - NORMS

KW - GENDER

KW - FORMS

U2 - 10.1111/sjop.12505

DO - 10.1111/sjop.12505

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EP - 86

JO - Scandinavian Journal of Psychology

JF - Scandinavian Journal of Psychology

SN - 0036-5564

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