Integration involves a trade-off between fertility and status for World War II evacuees

Robert Lynch, Virpi Lummaa, Karthik Panchanathan, Kevin Middleton, Anna Rotkirch, Mirkka Danielsbacka, David O'Brien, John Loehr

Forskningsoutput: TidskriftsbidragArtikelVetenskapligPeer review

Sammanfattning

Understanding how refugees integrate into host societies has broad implications for researchers interested in intergroup conflict and for governments concerned with promoting social cohesion. Using detailed records tracking the movements and life histories of Finnish evacuees during World War II, we find that evacuees who intermarry are more likely to be educated, work in professional occupations, marry someone higher in social status and remain in the host community. Evacuees who intermarry before the war have fewer children, whereas those who marry into their host community after the war have more children. These results indicate that life-history and assimilation outcomes depend on key differences between pre-war environments—when migrants are living in their own communities—and post-war environments—when migrants are living in the host community. Overall, this suggests that integration involves a trade-off between reproduction and status such that evacuees who integrate gain social status, whereas those who maintain stronger bonds with their natal communities have higher fertility. We discuss these results within the framework of social capital, intergroup conflict and life-history theory and suggest how they can inform our understanding of evolutionary adaptations that affect tribalism.
Originalspråkengelska
TidskriftNature Human Behaviour
Volym3
Utgåva4
Sidor (från-till)337-345
Antal sidor9
ISSN2397-3374
DOI
StatusPublicerad - apr 2019
MoE-publikationstypA1 Tidskriftsartikel-refererad

Vetenskapsgrenar

  • 1181 Ekologi, evolutionsbiologi
  • 5144 Socialpsykologi
  • 5141 Sociologi

Citera det här

Lynch, Robert ; Lummaa, Virpi ; Panchanathan, Karthik ; Middleton, Kevin ; Rotkirch, Anna ; Danielsbacka, Mirkka ; O'Brien, David ; Loehr, John. / Integration involves a trade-off between fertility and status for World War II evacuees. I: Nature Human Behaviour. 2019 ; Vol. 3, Nr. 4. s. 337-345.
@article{71bc30f9f32742e7b4a6bb36c519a01f,
title = "Integration involves a trade-off between fertility and status for World War II evacuees",
abstract = "Understanding how refugees integrate into host societies has broad implications for researchers interested in intergroup conflict and for governments concerned with promoting social cohesion. Using detailed records tracking the movements and life histories of Finnish evacuees during World War II, we find that evacuees who intermarry are more likely to be educated, work in professional occupations, marry someone higher in social status and remain in the host community. Evacuees who intermarry before the war have fewer children, whereas those who marry into their host community after the war have more children. These results indicate that life-history and assimilation outcomes depend on key differences between pre-war environments—when migrants are living in their own communities—and post-war environments—when migrants are living in the host community. Overall, this suggests that integration involves a trade-off between reproduction and status such that evacuees who integrate gain social status, whereas those who maintain stronger bonds with their natal communities have higher fertility. We discuss these results within the framework of social capital, intergroup conflict and life-history theory and suggest how they can inform our understanding of evolutionary adaptations that affect tribalism.",
keywords = "1181 Ecology, evolutionary biology, IMMIGRANTS, INTERMARRIAGE, ASSIMILATION, COMPETITION, EVOLUTION, DISPERSAL, MIGRATION, PATTERNS, DISTANCE, TRENDS, 5144 Social psychology, 5141 Sociology",
author = "Robert Lynch and Virpi Lummaa and Karthik Panchanathan and Kevin Middleton and Anna Rotkirch and Mirkka Danielsbacka and David O'Brien and John Loehr",
year = "2019",
month = "4",
doi = "10.1038/s41562-019-0542-5",
language = "English",
volume = "3",
pages = "337--345",
journal = "Nature Human Behaviour",
issn = "2397-3374",
publisher = "Nature Publishing Group",
number = "4",

}

Integration involves a trade-off between fertility and status for World War II evacuees. / Lynch, Robert; Lummaa, Virpi; Panchanathan, Karthik; Middleton, Kevin; Rotkirch, Anna; Danielsbacka, Mirkka; O'Brien, David; Loehr, John.

I: Nature Human Behaviour, Vol. 3, Nr. 4, 04.2019, s. 337-345.

Forskningsoutput: TidskriftsbidragArtikelVetenskapligPeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Integration involves a trade-off between fertility and status for World War II evacuees

AU - Lynch, Robert

AU - Lummaa, Virpi

AU - Panchanathan, Karthik

AU - Middleton, Kevin

AU - Rotkirch, Anna

AU - Danielsbacka, Mirkka

AU - O'Brien, David

AU - Loehr, John

PY - 2019/4

Y1 - 2019/4

N2 - Understanding how refugees integrate into host societies has broad implications for researchers interested in intergroup conflict and for governments concerned with promoting social cohesion. Using detailed records tracking the movements and life histories of Finnish evacuees during World War II, we find that evacuees who intermarry are more likely to be educated, work in professional occupations, marry someone higher in social status and remain in the host community. Evacuees who intermarry before the war have fewer children, whereas those who marry into their host community after the war have more children. These results indicate that life-history and assimilation outcomes depend on key differences between pre-war environments—when migrants are living in their own communities—and post-war environments—when migrants are living in the host community. Overall, this suggests that integration involves a trade-off between reproduction and status such that evacuees who integrate gain social status, whereas those who maintain stronger bonds with their natal communities have higher fertility. We discuss these results within the framework of social capital, intergroup conflict and life-history theory and suggest how they can inform our understanding of evolutionary adaptations that affect tribalism.

AB - Understanding how refugees integrate into host societies has broad implications for researchers interested in intergroup conflict and for governments concerned with promoting social cohesion. Using detailed records tracking the movements and life histories of Finnish evacuees during World War II, we find that evacuees who intermarry are more likely to be educated, work in professional occupations, marry someone higher in social status and remain in the host community. Evacuees who intermarry before the war have fewer children, whereas those who marry into their host community after the war have more children. These results indicate that life-history and assimilation outcomes depend on key differences between pre-war environments—when migrants are living in their own communities—and post-war environments—when migrants are living in the host community. Overall, this suggests that integration involves a trade-off between reproduction and status such that evacuees who integrate gain social status, whereas those who maintain stronger bonds with their natal communities have higher fertility. We discuss these results within the framework of social capital, intergroup conflict and life-history theory and suggest how they can inform our understanding of evolutionary adaptations that affect tribalism.

KW - 1181 Ecology, evolutionary biology

KW - IMMIGRANTS

KW - INTERMARRIAGE

KW - ASSIMILATION

KW - COMPETITION

KW - EVOLUTION

KW - DISPERSAL

KW - MIGRATION

KW - PATTERNS

KW - DISTANCE

KW - TRENDS

KW - 5144 Social psychology

KW - 5141 Sociology

U2 - 10.1038/s41562-019-0542-5

DO - 10.1038/s41562-019-0542-5

M3 - Article

VL - 3

SP - 337

EP - 345

JO - Nature Human Behaviour

JF - Nature Human Behaviour

SN - 2397-3374

IS - 4

ER -