Intergenerational transmission of socioeconomic position and ideal cardiovascular health: 32-year follow-up study

Kateryna Savelieva, Laura Pulkki-Råback, Markus Jokela, Laura D. Kubzansky, Marko Elovainio, Vera Mikkilä, Tuija Tammelin, Markus Juonala, Olli T. Raitakari, Liisa Keltikangas-Järvinen

Forskningsoutput: TidskriftsbidragArtikelVetenskapligPeer review

Sammanfattning

Objectives: Socioeconomic position (SEP) in childhood predicts cardiovascular health in adulthood but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Using a longitudinal study design, we examined the extent to which adult SEP acts as a pathway (mediator) connecting childhood SEP with adult cardiovascular health, and if upward social mobility mitigates the health-effects of early low SEP. Method: The sample comprised 697 participants from a prospective Finnish cohort followed during 32 years. Childhood SEP was assessed from the parents in 1980 (participant mean age 10.9) and adulthood SEP was examined in 2007 and 2012 (participant mean age 43.2 in 2012). Both childhood and adulthood SEP scores comprised education, income, occupational status, and occupational stability. Ideal cardiovascular health was assessed in 2007 and 2012 according to the American Heart Association's guidelines. Results: Higher childhood SEP was associated with higher ideal cardiovascular health index in adulthood (beta = 0.13, p <.001) independently of sex, age, childhood cardiovascular risk factors, and chronic conditions. Mediation analysis showed that adult SEP accounted for 33% of the association between childhood SEP and ideal cardiovascular health index. Upwardly mobile participants scored higher on ideal cardiovascular health in adulthood compared with participants staying in lower SEP (M = 4.05 vs. 3.56, p <.001). Conclusions: Transmission of SEP over generations is a predictor of health inequalities, which should be considered in cardiovascular prevention. Although upward social mobility mitigates some of the effect of early SEP disadvantage on later cardiovascular health, childhood SEP remains an important predictor of future health.
Originalspråkengelska
TidskriftHealth Psychology
Volym36
Utgåva3
Sidor (från-till)270-279
Antal sidor10
ISSN0278-6133
DOI
StatusPublicerad - 1 mar 2017
MoE-publikationstypA1 Tidskriftsartikel-refererad

Vetenskapsgrenar

  • 515 Psykologi

Citera det här

@article{72ebb822fc6946da8fc029190efd49f4,
title = "Intergenerational transmission of socioeconomic position and ideal cardiovascular health: 32-year follow-up study",
abstract = "Objectives: Socioeconomic position (SEP) in childhood predicts cardiovascular health in adulthood but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Using a longitudinal study design, we examined the extent to which adult SEP acts as a pathway (mediator) connecting childhood SEP with adult cardiovascular health, and if upward social mobility mitigates the health-effects of early low SEP. Method: The sample comprised 697 participants from a prospective Finnish cohort followed during 32 years. Childhood SEP was assessed from the parents in 1980 (participant mean age 10.9) and adulthood SEP was examined in 2007 and 2012 (participant mean age 43.2 in 2012). Both childhood and adulthood SEP scores comprised education, income, occupational status, and occupational stability. Ideal cardiovascular health was assessed in 2007 and 2012 according to the American Heart Association's guidelines. Results: Higher childhood SEP was associated with higher ideal cardiovascular health index in adulthood (beta = 0.13, p <.001) independently of sex, age, childhood cardiovascular risk factors, and chronic conditions. Mediation analysis showed that adult SEP accounted for 33{\%} of the association between childhood SEP and ideal cardiovascular health index. Upwardly mobile participants scored higher on ideal cardiovascular health in adulthood compared with participants staying in lower SEP (M = 4.05 vs. 3.56, p <.001). Conclusions: Transmission of SEP over generations is a predictor of health inequalities, which should be considered in cardiovascular prevention. Although upward social mobility mitigates some of the effect of early SEP disadvantage on later cardiovascular health, childhood SEP remains an important predictor of future health.",
keywords = "515 Psychology, Ideal cardiovascular health, SOCIOECONOMIC POSITION, INTERGENERATIONAL TRANSMISSION, social mobility, prospective study, CORONARY-HEART-DISEASE, LIFE-COURSE, SOCIAL-MOBILITY, ADULT HEALTH, PSYCHOSOCIAL FACTORS, YOUNG FINNS, BIRTH COHORT, CHILDHOOD, RISK, DETERMINANTS",
author = "Kateryna Savelieva and Laura Pulkki-R{\aa}back and Markus Jokela and Kubzansky, {Laura D.} and Marko Elovainio and Vera Mikkil{\"a} and Tuija Tammelin and Markus Juonala and Raitakari, {Olli T.} and Liisa Keltikangas-J{\"a}rvinen",
year = "2017",
month = "3",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1037/hea0000441",
language = "English",
volume = "36",
pages = "270--279",
journal = "Health Psychology",
issn = "0278-6133",
publisher = "American Psychological Association (APA)",
number = "3",

}

Intergenerational transmission of socioeconomic position and ideal cardiovascular health : 32-year follow-up study. / Savelieva, Kateryna; Pulkki-Råback, Laura; Jokela, Markus; Kubzansky, Laura D.; Elovainio, Marko; Mikkilä, Vera; Tammelin, Tuija; Juonala, Markus; Raitakari, Olli T.; Keltikangas-Järvinen, Liisa.

I: Health Psychology, Vol. 36, Nr. 3, 01.03.2017, s. 270-279.

Forskningsoutput: TidskriftsbidragArtikelVetenskapligPeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Intergenerational transmission of socioeconomic position and ideal cardiovascular health

T2 - 32-year follow-up study

AU - Savelieva, Kateryna

AU - Pulkki-Råback, Laura

AU - Jokela, Markus

AU - Kubzansky, Laura D.

AU - Elovainio, Marko

AU - Mikkilä, Vera

AU - Tammelin, Tuija

AU - Juonala, Markus

AU - Raitakari, Olli T.

AU - Keltikangas-Järvinen, Liisa

PY - 2017/3/1

Y1 - 2017/3/1

N2 - Objectives: Socioeconomic position (SEP) in childhood predicts cardiovascular health in adulthood but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Using a longitudinal study design, we examined the extent to which adult SEP acts as a pathway (mediator) connecting childhood SEP with adult cardiovascular health, and if upward social mobility mitigates the health-effects of early low SEP. Method: The sample comprised 697 participants from a prospective Finnish cohort followed during 32 years. Childhood SEP was assessed from the parents in 1980 (participant mean age 10.9) and adulthood SEP was examined in 2007 and 2012 (participant mean age 43.2 in 2012). Both childhood and adulthood SEP scores comprised education, income, occupational status, and occupational stability. Ideal cardiovascular health was assessed in 2007 and 2012 according to the American Heart Association's guidelines. Results: Higher childhood SEP was associated with higher ideal cardiovascular health index in adulthood (beta = 0.13, p <.001) independently of sex, age, childhood cardiovascular risk factors, and chronic conditions. Mediation analysis showed that adult SEP accounted for 33% of the association between childhood SEP and ideal cardiovascular health index. Upwardly mobile participants scored higher on ideal cardiovascular health in adulthood compared with participants staying in lower SEP (M = 4.05 vs. 3.56, p <.001). Conclusions: Transmission of SEP over generations is a predictor of health inequalities, which should be considered in cardiovascular prevention. Although upward social mobility mitigates some of the effect of early SEP disadvantage on later cardiovascular health, childhood SEP remains an important predictor of future health.

AB - Objectives: Socioeconomic position (SEP) in childhood predicts cardiovascular health in adulthood but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Using a longitudinal study design, we examined the extent to which adult SEP acts as a pathway (mediator) connecting childhood SEP with adult cardiovascular health, and if upward social mobility mitigates the health-effects of early low SEP. Method: The sample comprised 697 participants from a prospective Finnish cohort followed during 32 years. Childhood SEP was assessed from the parents in 1980 (participant mean age 10.9) and adulthood SEP was examined in 2007 and 2012 (participant mean age 43.2 in 2012). Both childhood and adulthood SEP scores comprised education, income, occupational status, and occupational stability. Ideal cardiovascular health was assessed in 2007 and 2012 according to the American Heart Association's guidelines. Results: Higher childhood SEP was associated with higher ideal cardiovascular health index in adulthood (beta = 0.13, p <.001) independently of sex, age, childhood cardiovascular risk factors, and chronic conditions. Mediation analysis showed that adult SEP accounted for 33% of the association between childhood SEP and ideal cardiovascular health index. Upwardly mobile participants scored higher on ideal cardiovascular health in adulthood compared with participants staying in lower SEP (M = 4.05 vs. 3.56, p <.001). Conclusions: Transmission of SEP over generations is a predictor of health inequalities, which should be considered in cardiovascular prevention. Although upward social mobility mitigates some of the effect of early SEP disadvantage on later cardiovascular health, childhood SEP remains an important predictor of future health.

KW - 515 Psychology

KW - Ideal cardiovascular health

KW - SOCIOECONOMIC POSITION

KW - INTERGENERATIONAL TRANSMISSION

KW - social mobility

KW - prospective study

KW - CORONARY-HEART-DISEASE

KW - LIFE-COURSE

KW - SOCIAL-MOBILITY

KW - ADULT HEALTH

KW - PSYCHOSOCIAL FACTORS

KW - YOUNG FINNS

KW - BIRTH COHORT

KW - CHILDHOOD

KW - RISK

KW - DETERMINANTS

U2 - 10.1037/hea0000441

DO - 10.1037/hea0000441

M3 - Article

VL - 36

SP - 270

EP - 279

JO - Health Psychology

JF - Health Psychology

SN - 0278-6133

IS - 3

ER -